Forum: Veleno BBS

  • arnewsline

    From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, September 22, 2017 08:47:46
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2082 for Friday, September 22 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2082 with a release date of Friday, September 22 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams respond to Caribbean storms. Australian
    amateurs mark 60 years -- and climb aboard a railroad DSTAR Net that's
    right on track. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2082
    comes your way right now.

    **
    CARIBBEAN STORM DEVASTATION CONTINUES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: For our top story, we turn to the Caribbean and our correspondent Bobby Best WX4ALA, who has a report on amateur radio
    response.

    BOBBY: Without a doubt, The National Hurricane Center's Net, along with
    its cousin, The Echolink Skywarn/Hurricane Net have both been receiving
    more than their fair share of work out's recently.

    According to a press conference held by the governor of Puerto Rico
    "there may be portions of the island that may not have electricity
    restored."

    Volunteers are wanted and needed, however at the request of the managers
    of affected areas, please contact via your section Emergency
    Coordinator. Start with your local ARES coordinator and with their
    assistance, find out where you are officially needed.

    The National Hurricane Center predicted in late April to early May, that
    the 2017 Atlantic basin Hurricane season which runs from June through November, was going to the busiest year for hurricanes. Thus far, you
    won't hear any arguments on that, from this Broadcast Meteorologist.

    Many of the islands, in the Caribbean are not fortunate enough to
    receive assistance from larger countries, like Puerto Rico will, with it
    being a territory of The United States.

    At this point, the Section Managers and Section Emergency Coordinators
    are in the process of creating a list of needed supplies, that you can
    buy yourself and send or if you prefer you can make a financial
    donation. There are numerous non-profit organizations in the Caribbean,
    that we've not even been able to do welfare checks on.

    Please give what you can now, be it goods or cash and send it to assist
    these poor people who have already been through two major hurricanes and
    could be possibly facing a third if weather paterns don't quickly turn.

    Stay with Amateur Radio Newsline, both our weekly radio broadcast and
    our Facebook page, which is updated on a daily basis.
    Keeping an eye on the tropics, I'm Broadcast Meteorologist Bobby Best
    WX4ALA in Jasper, Alabama.

    **
    'AMELIA EARHART' PILOT BACK IN THE NEWS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The Texas ham radio operator who followed Amelia
    Earhart's final flight route has landed in a magazine photo essay.
    Here's Geri Goodrich KF5KRN with that story.

    GERI'S REPORT: You may remember aviator Brian Lloyd WB6RQN, who circumnavigated the globe in his single-engine airplane in tribute to
    Amelia Earhart's final flight 80 years ago, logging QSOs as he went.
    He's back to more earthly pursuits, at least for now and a celebration
    of that two-month flight into aviation history got full display for
    readers of The Texas Monthly magazine.

    A series of photographs showcases highlights of his 28-thousand mile
    trip, putting the spotlight on his plane, Spirit, covered in the
    signatures of people he met along the way - and there's a discussion of
    the HF radio that brought him closer to the world while he was still in
    the air. His next challenge, he told the magazine, is replicating the
    New York-to-Paris fight of Charles Lindbergh, a trip scrapped earlier
    this year on account of bad weather.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    **
    FCC ADVISES ON USE OF 630 AND 2200 METERS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: If you're ready to operate on 630 meters and 2200
    meters, there's something you must do first as Skeeter Nash N5ASH tells us.

    SKEETER'S REPORT: If you have plans for the next three years to get on
    those two new bands, 630 meters and 2200 meters, you will need to notify
    the Utilities Technology Council first. The FCC made the announcement
    recently in the Federal Register, informing hams that they need to
    submit their call signs to the UTC, tell the council what band they wish
    to operate on and identify the coordinates where their fixed antenna is located.

    Operation on these two bands has been approved for fixed locations only
    - no mobile operation is permitted. The notice said that the UTC has 30
    days to respond. Unless the council reports back that the applicant's
    antenna is within 1 kilometer of a power line carrier system on the same frequency or an overlapping one, the band may be used from that location.

    Hams can apply for approval directly from the Utilities Technology
    Council website. Visit our website, arnewsline-dot-org (arnewsline.org)
    and view the printed version of this script for a link to the online application.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.


    https://utc.org/plc-database-amateur-notification-process/

    **

    K2BSA CONTINUES PREP FOR SCOUT JAMBOREE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: It's a busy time for the K2BSA callsign as Bill Stearns
    NE4RD tells us.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in radio scouting we have two activations of
    the K2BSA callsign, one activation from Scout Camps on the Air, and
    we're 5 weeks out from Jamboree on the Air!

    David Hinkley, KA0SOG, will be activating K2BSA/0 from the Kansas City Speedway in Kansas City, Kansas, from September 22nd through the 25th.
    This council wide weekend jamboree hosts around 14,000 Scouts and
    Scouters where they will participate in many activities include the STEM
    area where an extensive Amateur Radio setup will be offering different
    HF, VHF, and UHF operating modes for the Scouts to experience. They
    will also have an ARISS contact with the International Space Station,
    where a few lucky boys will get to ask questions with an astronaut.

    Gregory Pioppi, KB2ANG, will be activating K2BSA/3 from Braden Airpark
    N43 in Easton, Pennsylvania, from September 29th through October 1st.
    This is a great opportunity for Scouts to get their Aviation MB, but
    also a great time to get on the air. Gregory's team started this two
    years ago in order to offer Scouts and activity while they wait for
    their flights. They setup a HF and VHF station and provide a little introduction before getting Scouts on the air.

    Terry Gampper, N0BXQ, will be activating KN0BSA from Camp Wakonda in
    Bellevue, NE, on September 23rd. This is a Webelows cub scout event and
    will be operating on the JOTA frequencies.

    Speaking of Jamboree on the Air, we are only 5 weeks away from the
    largest Scouting activity in the World. This is 60th anniversary of the
    event this year where over 1 million Scouts participate across 150 plus countries. This is the month that you finalize your activation plans by having your participant certificates and logs printed out, prepare and
    print QSL cards, finalize your roster and donations, and if you haven't registered your station, you need to do that now. If you want to
    reserve the K2BSA callsign for your activity, now is also the time to do
    that. We have a few call areas left!

    For more information on K2BSA and radio scouting , please visit our
    website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Association, this is
    Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    (K2BSA)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN CLUB MARKS 60th YEAR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Another group is also marking 60 years, as we hear from
    Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: While October 20th through 22nd this year marks a very
    special, 60th anniversary, for the scout's worldwide Jamboree on the air event, a few days earlier on Wednesday the 18th. of October another organization celebrates 60 years of existence.

    On Thursday the 18th. of October 1957, what was to become the Central
    Coast Amateur Radio Club, had it's inaugural meeting where 37 people
    attended. The club has been a stable part of amateur radio in New South
    Wales, Australia for the last 60 years, running at one point 15
    repeaters and beacon stations. That has since been consolidated to a
    lower number but still provides analogue and digital voice plus ATV
    repeaters covering from 6 meters to 23 centimeters. The club runs
    regular licence classes and exams, is involved in contests, supports the
    local WICEN (Emcoms) group and is probably most well known for its
    annual Hamfest, or Field day as they are called in Australia. The Wyong
    Field Day run by the CCARC is the largest gathering of Radio Amateurs in
    the southern hemisphere and it too, will celebrate 60 years next
    February the 25th.

    The club is planning celebrations between the 60th club anniversary in
    October and the 60th Hamfest in February but as is normal with this hard working club, things will most likely be low key.

    HERE'S to another 60 years of the Central Coast ARC in New South Wales Australia! The club's website is CCARC dot ORG dot AU.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **
    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including
    the N5OZG repeater on New Orleans, Louisiana after the 8 p.m. Sunday
    night Net.

    **
    RADIO OPERATORS ASSIST IN RESCUE, RECOVERY

    STEPHEN: Not all rescue missions that involve amateur radio end up
    staying rescue missions. Sometimes they end in tragic recovery. When New Jersey hiker Alex Stevens went missing earlier this month in New York's Adirondack Mountains, a team went out to look for the 28-year-old. The
    team comprised Stowe Mountain Rescue, the state Department of
    Environmental Conservation, the Newcomb Fire Department and the
    Adirondack Amateur Radio Association, among others. According to news
    reports, forest rangers found Stevens' body near Wallface Pond on
    September 18th and New York State Police have begun investigating his
    death.

    From New Zealand comes a much more upbeat report about a missing
    person. He was found alive. We hear those details from Jason Daniels
    VK2LAW.

    JASON's REPORT: An 88-year-old man who had gone missing from his care
    home in Invercargill was found nearly 10 hours later following an
    overnight search by police, rescue squad members and the Invercargill
    Amateur Radio Emergency Communications group. The man, whose name was
    not released by authorities, had apparently wandered off at about 7:30
    p.m. on Monday the 18th of September. He was located on Tuesday the 19th
    of September at about 5:30 in the morning. The man was found cold, wet
    and muddy in a ditch about 1.5 kilometers from the home on Racecourse
    Road. Rescuers transported him to the local hospital.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jason Daniels VK2LAW

    **
    TRAIN AND RAILROAD NET IS RIGHT ON TRACK

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: If you love trains - and we don't mean the kind you
    commute to work on - you might enjoy this next story. Paul Braun WD9GCO reports on a new net in this installment in our occasional series, Nets
    of Note.

    PAUL: Many of us have more than one interest or hobby. Often, there's a
    happy intersection where two or more of those hobbies overlap. Daryl
    Stout, WX1DER, found just such an overlap with the D-STAR Trains and
    Railroads Net.

    DARYL STOUT: This is actually a revival of a net that ran on RF and
    EchoLink in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area for over eight years but
    technical issues led to it going the way of the abandoned line in early
    2017. However, in working with the British Columbia Frequency Modulation Communications Association and with Ted, VE7LEE I got permission to use Reflector 26A on D-STAR for the net. The net covers anything and
    everything related to trains and railroading - that's passenger,
    freight, steam, diesel, excursions, museums, depots, signals, model and
    garden railroads, timetables, memorabilia, railroad shows, fallen flags, etcetera.

    PAUL: This is a net that I can definitely relate to - I'm also a
    railroad fan from childhood, a Chicago and North Western man through and through, the way Don Wilbanks is a Pontiac man. There's a little North
    Western passenger train on the shelf above my radios.

    I asked Stout about the response to the net, and he said it's been very positive, and many were actually involved in railroading:

    STOUT: They were very happy - several had originally worked for the
    railroad. My late uncle - the youngest engineer ever hired on by the Pennsylvania Central - the Penn Central - he was also the only other ham
    radio operator in the family. His call was K3VRM, Kilo 3 Victor Romeo
    Mike but he said it stood for Veteran Railroad Man. He actually had a
    steam engine on his QSL card. From him I got my love of both ham radio
    and trains.

    PAUL: The net runs every Friday at 7PM Central or Zero Hours UTC on
    Reflector 26 Alpha on D-STAR. According to Stout, the net runs for about
    an hour, beginning with the first round of checkins. So, if you're
    interested in any form of trains or railroading, and have access to
    D-STAR, the Trains and Railroads Net is for you.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO. All Aboard!

    **
    MILLING ABOUT ON THE AIR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Hams in Belgium are big on enthusiasm for mill
    activations even if the event is small, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED's REPORT: The Belgian Mill Award competition is a modest-sized, four-hour-long contest in which hams operate phone on 80 meters and also
    on 2 meters in FM and SSB.

    One participant Leon ON4VLM told Amateur Radio Newsline that the fact
    that the contest is small and short makes it even more fun - usually.
    It's a manageable size and when conditions are good, there are plenty of contacts to be had.

    This year unfortunately solar flares and solar winds combined to
    challenge competitors on the 17th of September. Still, Leon's club
    station ON4WLR/P has a log they can be proud of. Leon told us that club operators still managed to work 23 of the 27 mills in the contest, and
    made contact with eight of Belgiium's nine provinces.

    If you want to see the club in action, we have a link to the online
    slideshow in the script on our website.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQvTG4gwTl4&feature=youtu.be


    (LEON ON4VLM)

    **

    SIX METERS GETS COOKING IN TEXAS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: If you're near Austin, Texas and you really want to get cooking on 6 meters, Neil Rapp WB9VBG shares this recipe.

    NEIL'S REPORT: What goes better with ham than some BBQ? The famous 6
    meter BBQ is continuing thanks to support from FlexRadio and DX
    Engineering. The BBQ will take place this year on September 29th and
    30th at the Lonestar Court in Austin, Texas. Several vendors will be on
    hand, and presentations about how to get the most out of your 6 meter
    setup will be made by some top experts. And, two additional speakers
    have been added. Tim Duffy, K3LR, will review new Low Noise 6 meter LFA
    Yagis. And, the one of the leading experts on receiver performance, Rob Sherwood, NC0B, will review the performance of a wide selection of
    radios exclusively for 6 meters. For more information, visit
    sixmeterbbq.com. Be sure to bring your appetite for 6 meters!

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I�m Neil Rapp WB9VPG in
    Bloomington, Indiana.

    **
    WORLD OF DX


    Elsewhere in DXing, you have a few more days to listen for Al, K7AR,
    operating as 5W0RA in Samoa. Al is calling QRZ on 160-10 meters using
    SSB, CW and RTTY. Send QSLs via his home callsign, ClubLog or LoTW.

    A team of Indian amateurs including Rama/VU2DEV, Gaurav/VU2GTI and Pradeep/VU3EDG will be using the call sign AT7M while operating from St. Mary's Islands between the 30th of September 30 and the first of
    October. St. Mary's Island is also known as Coconut Island off the
    Arabian Sea coast near Karnataka,
    India. Be listening on various HF bands and in various modes. Send QSL
    cards via VU3NPI.

    There's disappointing news for amateurs who've been awaiting the
    Argentinian DXers Group operation as PJ7T from Saint Maarten. Widespread damage has cancelled the group's planned operation that would have
    started the 24th of October. The group is presently securing the
    necessary paperwork to use San Andres Island as its alternate
    destination at an as-yet unknown date.

    (OHIO PENN DX BULLETIN)

    **
    KICKER: GIVE THIS WEDDING RECEPTION A 5 x 9

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: There are ham radio licenses and there are marriage
    licenses. Jeremy Boot G4NJH has a story about what happens when the two converge.

    JEREMY: Congratulations to M0NFE & M6YAX -- that would be Nick and
    Majbritt, now "Mr. and Mrs." officially as of Saturday, September 16th.
    Their wedding in Essex was followed by some exceptionally festive
    partying at Hawkwell Village Hall thanks to some clever Linux
    programming written by the groom, who is a software developer. Nick's
    code was designed to operate some of the wedding attractions - with
    prompts both in English and in German, to make things easier for his
    bride's friends and his new in-laws. The wedding unexpectedly turned
    into a minor rescue mission - the kind that amateurs, of course, are accustomed to. An hour before the wedding, fellow Essex Ham club member
    Pete Sipple M0PSX, received a call from Nick that there was no Internet connection at the venue. The club loaned Nick its portable WiFi hotspot
    and wedding bells were soon ringing. Pete and his wife Sarah M6PSK were
    among the happy guests. As for the newlyweds, they may not have spent
    their wedding day talking on the air, but clearly they spent it dancing
    on air.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (ESSEX HAM, PETE SIPPLE M0PSX)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    the Associated Press; CQ Magazine; Essex Hall; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; K2BSA; Leon ON4VLM; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; Pete Sipple M0PSX; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, September 29, 2017 11:17:54
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]


    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2083 for Friday, September 29 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2083 with a release date of Friday, September 29 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams help Florida with storm recovery. In
    California, a ham's killer is sentenced to prison -- and Spain
    celebrates the success of young-but-growing regional hamfest. All this
    and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2083 comes your way right now.

    (Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

    **
    AMATEURS HELP FLORIDIANS PICK UP THE PIECES

    DON/ANCHOR: We begin this week's report with a story of post-storm
    recovery efforts. As Floridians rebuild after the most recent hurricane,
    hams are there. Kent Peterson KC0DGY spoke with one Red Cross volunteer
    who also happens to be an amateur involved with a busy ARES team.

    KENT'S REPORT:

    MORRIS: I was working Hurricane Harvey in Baton Rouge repairing mobile
    radios when we were sent back to Florida to prepare for Irma and then
    joined my ARES team, we opened 4 evacuation shelters and ran radios 24/7.

    KENT: In addition to being involved with ARES, Dave Morris N4DWM is also
    a Red Cross volunteer.

    MORRIS: I hopped in my Red Cross vehicle and came down to the Keys I
    was one of the first Red Cross people as well as one of the first hams
    to come down to the Keys. At that point in time no one was allowed into
    the Keys unless you were in an emergency vehicle. When I arrived down
    here, I worked on generator power setting up a satellite system. The
    preferred technology for the Red Cross is satellite communications
    however I did put up my Buddipole pole and my own ham radio on 40 meters
    I did check in with the HF hurricane net. We started up in some pretty
    rugged conditions as days went by the power company got it restored and
    I was redeployed with the satellite system to Sugar Loaf Key which was
    ground zero, very rugged conditions, the National Guard was there with
    us. At that point no residents were allowed in that far down. After
    several days the power came back and they started to get some
    infrastructure and they started to let some of the residents in. One
    thing I noticed was cell phones will not stay up during this kind of
    weather event and you have to find other means to communicate.

    KENT: Morris emphasized the value amateur radio operators bring to the
    Red Cross.

    MORRIS: The Red Cross really values the use of amateurs in their communications systems, now obviously hams don't get to play with
    satellite communication much, where in the Red Cross they use it
    extensively. But in the emergency shelters it was all 2 meters. We did
    have HF radio but it wasn't necessary.

    KENT: Morris says there are important lessons learned.

    MORRIS: Number one, the Red Cross needs the skills that amateurs have to
    make their relief operations work well. And everything you do on Field
    Day you do in this scenario. I know everyone practices every field day
    once a year we all do what we know how to do, believe me when you end up
    in this situation you use those skills.

    KENT: And he says the Keys are starting the rebuild.

    MORRIS: As the Keys recover while there is a lot of devastation here,
    this is a resilient group of people and it looks to me like they're
    starting to get back on their feet.

    For Amateur Radio Neweline, I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY

    **
    PRISON FOR CALIFORNIA HAM'S KILLER

    DON/ANCHOR: There's justice at last for the killer of David Caouette
    (CO-ETT) N6DAC. It arrived at his sentencing in an Orange County,
    California courtroom on September 22. Joe Moell (MELL) K-zero-O-V has
    the story.

    JOE'S REPORT:

    "You emerged as the face of evil in this community." Those were the
    words of Superior Court Judge Thomas Goethals as he imposed a 232-year
    prison sentence on Scott Dekraai. It was back in October 2011 when
    Dekraai, heavily armed and wearing a bulletproof vest, walked into a
    Seal Beach hair salon and shot his ex-wife. He kept firing at everyone
    else in sight and then made his escape. In the parking lot, he spotted
    David Caouette N6DAC sitting in his truck. N6DAC was a former star high-school athlete who loved offroading in his Land Rover. Thinking he
    was an undercover officer, Dekraai shot the 64-year-old ham, making him
    the eighth fatal victim of his rampage. Dekraai soon surrendered, but
    his case dragged on as evidence mounted showing widespread misuse of
    jailhouse informants by the District Attorney and Sheriff's offices.
    That led the judge to rule out capital punishment, even though Dekraai
    had pleaded guilty. However, Friday's verdict gave him no chance of
    parole. In closing the case, Judge Goethals said that there were no
    winners in this case, only losers. The only win, he said, is by the
    rule of law. From Orange County, California, this is Joe Moell K0OV for Amateur Radio Newsline.

    **

    ARISS PROGRAM SEEKS APPLICANTS FOR CONTACTS

    DON/ANCHOR: Hams on the International Space Station want students to
    look to the sky - and then start talking. Here's Neil Rapp WB9VPG with
    the details.

    NEIL'S REPORT: So what exactly do you say to an astronaut? Well, if you
    could have been on the air with Space Station astronaut Joe Acaba KE5DAR recently, you might have asked about his concerns for his home in
    Houston as well as his family's homeland in Puerto Rico, both impacted
    by recent hurricanes. Schools, museums, youth groups and science centers
    will get a chance to ask these kinds of questions - and other kinds of questions - next year as the Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station program once again solicits for proposals for groups to talk to
    the orbiting crew members between July 1 and December 31 of next year.
    The program connects students around the world with the men and women in
    space but these radio contacts require planning. The ARISS program looks
    for participants who can build a well-thought-out lesson plan around the actual contact itself, which occurs over amateur radio. That means
    students are exposed to radio science, satellite communications,
    wireless technology and other STEM topics.
    Deadline for proposals in November 15th. For proposal guidelines and
    other information, the web address is arrl.org/ariss.


    As any educator will tell you, there's a lot that can be said in those important and unforgettable 10 minutes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

    (ARISS)

    **
    SPAIN'S IBERRADIO HAMFEST A HIT

    DON/ANCHOR: Spain's IberRadio hamfest is just three years old but it's maturing, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: It appears that IberRadio, south Europe's largest hamfest, is
    gaining some traction. Its third annual gathering was held in Avila
    Spain on the 16th and 17th of September and the hamfest organizers say
    they had record attendance, drawing from an even wider international participation. The two days of vendor displays and seminars was designed
    to appeal directly to CBers, amateur radio operators and electronics enthusiasts, helping to make what the Iber Radio website said is one of
    the most important ham radio events in Europe. The hamfest also offered license testing by VEs from the ARRL allowing many to upgrade their FCC licenses. Other attendees seized the moment to have their QSL cards
    checked for DXCC, WAC and other awards.

    Already the planning has begun for Iber Radio 2018.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO NEWS)


    **

    PENN STATE PROFESSOR WINS SARNOFF HONOR

    DON/ANCHOR: One Pennsylvania professor isn't just tops in electrical engineering, he's a Sarnoff Citation winner. Jim Damron N8TMW has that
    report.

    JIM's REPORT: Antenna designer James Breakall WA3FET, a Pennsylvania
    State professor of electrical engineering, is in good company: He has
    joined the late Senator Barry Goldwater K7UGA and Qualcomm founding
    chairman and CEO emeritus Irwin Mark Jacobs in receiving the Sarnoff
    Citation from the Radio Club of America.

    Licensed since the age of 12, he credits ham radio with igniting his
    later interest in an electrical engineering career. His specialty soon
    became antennas. Breakall holds a patent for the three-dimensional frequency-independent phased array design antenna which he developed for
    its intended use at the High Frequency Auroral Research Program in
    Alaska. His antenna research also took him to Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory, home of the largest dish antenna in the world. He is also credited with the creation of the optimized wideband antenna for amateur radio.

    On campus, he is known for getting first-year engineering students
    involved in fox-hunting exercises with hand-held radios, as a way of
    opening the door for them to ham radio.

    James Breakall will receive the award in November at the RCA's annual
    awards banquet in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.


    (PENN STATE UNIVERSITY WEBSITE, RADIO CLUB OF AMERICA)

    **
    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    WB0QXW repeater in St. Louis, Missouri on Monday nights following the
    World Friendship Net on Echolink.


    **

    FORMER MIT PRESIDENT BECOMES SILENT KEY

    DON/ANCHOR: A noted Massachusetts Institute of Technology educator and
    former ham has become a Silent Key. Kevin Trotman N5PRE tells us about
    his life.

    KEVIN: The former president of MIT and a former longtime ham radio
    operator, Paul Gray of Concord, Massachusetts, has become a Silent Key.
    An electrical engineering professor emeritus, Paul became a ham radio
    operator as a New Jersey teen in the 1940s at the end of World War II.
    He was especially proud of having built all his own equipment and his
    lifelong fascination with gadgets and all things electrical served him
    well in his later career. He was first licensed in New Jersey as W2UWN
    and later became K1ZVT but his license lapsed in 1970.

    An electrical engineering graduate of the school, he became MIT's 14th president, serving between 1980 and 1990. The school plans a memorial
    service for November 30th.

    Paul Gray died September 18th after a long battle with Alzheimer's
    disease. He was 85.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline in Aiken, South Carolina, I'm Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE.

    **
    100 WATTS AND A WIRE SCHEDULES 2nd 'FALLOUT' ACTIVITY

    DON/ANCHOR: It's time to Fall Out. It's not a contest and not a Special
    Event Station. It's an annual activity of radio fellowship, as we hear
    from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN'S REPORT: What's the best thing in autumn besides the turning of
    the leaves? How about the turning of the dials on your rig up and down
    the HF bands? The 100 Watts and a Wire amateur radio community is
    marking the autumnal equinox with its second annual FALL OUT activity on
    the 6th and 7th of October.

    If you have a 100 Watts and a Wire ID, you're encouraged to go portable
    and get out among all those falling leaves to work other members -- or
    find a summit, a park or a beach. Exchange signal reports, exchange your 100WattsIDs, exchange ideas - and spot yourself on the group's Facebook
    page.

    If you can't go portable, stay home. Just get on the air - anytime
    during those days and in any mode. If you don't have a 100Watts ID, get
    one at the website 100wattsandawire dot com.

    It's not a contest but if you post your total contacts on their Facebook
    page you'll automatically be put in a random drawing for some prizes -
    prizes you'll be able to use in your shack no matter what the season.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    IN NEW ZEALAND, FRIENDLY COMPETITION

    DON/ANCHOR: In New Zealand, hams are getting ready for two weekends of
    Pacific Islands DXing, as Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us.

    JIM'S REPORT: Hams in New Zealand consider the Oceania DX Contest one of
    the easiest and most friendly competitions around. It's also one of the longest-running ham radio contests. In fact, this event seems to deliver everything but the on-air contact itself. The competition heats up
    during the first two weekends in October, over two 24-hour periods, and
    all that's needed is 50 QSOs to qualify for a certificate. The weekend
    of October 7th and 8th will be reserved for phone; CW operators will get
    their chance on October 14th and 15th.

    It's a tradition of Pacific Island contesting that dates back to the
    1930s and organizers are encouraging New Zealand hams in particular to
    make this their first contest if they have yet to jump into the fray.

    There are new island activations in the contest this year - both VK9XI
    and VK9CI will be on Christmas Island and Cocos Keeling Island
    respectively. There will also be a memorial plaque awarded for the first
    time this year in honor of Australian amateur Ken Jewell VK3AKK who
    became a Silent Key in May.

    According to the website, organizers in New Zealand and Australia have
    counted just fewer than 1,200 logs from last year's event - an increase
    of 70 percent over the previous year - so hope is high for this year's participation.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (OCEANIA DX CONTEST)

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    In other DX, be listening for Rich, N0HJZ, who will be active from
    October 23rd to November 1st as C6ARW from Grand Bahama Island. You can
    expect to hear Rich on 30/17/12 meters using CW and SSB. He will be
    operating low power with wires and verticals. His plans are to be in the
    CQWW DX SSB Contest October 28th and 29th as a
    Single-Op/All-Band/Low-Power entry. QSL via his home callsign, direct
    with sufficient postage or by the Bureau.

    Harald DF2WO is on the air from Burkina Faso through the 30th of October operating as XT2AW. Be listening on CW, SSB and digital. His QSL Manager
    is M0OXO.

    Listen for Stan LZ1GC who is on a DXPedition in the Pacific, operating
    as H40GC from Nendo Island from the 30th of September to the 20th of
    October. He is in the Temotu Province of the Solomon Islands which
    counts as a separate entity for the DXCC Award. The IOTA reference
    number is OC-100. QSL via Club Log OQRS.

    Victoria Island in the Barents Sea is being activated by a team of
    Russian operators with the call sign RI1F. No definite dates were made available by production time but they are expected to be on the air from October 1st through 7th. Send QSLs via Club Log OQRS. For the DXCC Award
    the contact counts as Franz Josef Land but for the IOTA Award use the reference number EU-190.

    (OHIO PENN DX BULLETIN)

    **

    KICKER: WHEN HAMS MAKE CONNECTIONS FROM THE HEART

    DON/ANCHOR: Finally, it's been a turbulent season of storms in some
    parts of the world and you've heard our reports about natural disasters
    and ravaged communities. You've also heard how ham radio has
    consistently met those challenges. We offer you now a bit of reflection:
    One of the many, MANY amateurs to step in with communications assistance
    this season was Stan Harts KK4WCW, a member of North Carolina's
    Hampstead Hams club. Stan joined the vast team of hams around his state connecting Puerto Rico's storm victims with worried relatives here in
    the U.S. Overcome with emotion after completing a successful contact on
    Sept. 23, Stan decided to share his feelings on social media - and now,
    we've asked him to share that with you. Here's Stan:

    STAN'S READING:
    For the past 5 years I have been into amateur radio. People sort of look
    at me like I am I crazy and ask me why I don't just use a cell phone.
    Puerto Rico is devastated by Hurricane Maria and there is no cellular
    phone system in operation. The Salvation Army is running what is known
    as a welfare net, where persons in Puerto Rico can get a brief message
    from a family locally (on paper) and relay it to an amateur radio
    operator on the U.S. mainland. Depending on a variety of conditions,
    some people hear certain signals better than others. Today I took a
    message from the net for a family with a 910 area code. I called to tell
    the person here that the family and their home was OK. Other than a
    slight language barrier and the bit of confusion as to how I got the
    message, the man started to cry with joy. About 15 minutes later, his
    wife called me back and asked for better details of how I got the
    message. It seems her husband forgets some of his English when he is
    crying. Well we were all crying. So for those who ask what my hobby is
    all about, this is it!!! The Iphone X won't reach Puerto Rico right now
    but a 1990 amateur radio on a 12V battery and a 100 foot wire strung
    between two trees in the back yard will.

    DON/ANCHOR: Thank you Stan and thanks to every amateur who joined in
    these efforts everywhere. Stan's words speak for every radio operator
    doing this priceless work: Ham radio is all about connections -- and in
    these trying circumstances those connections also happen to be lifelines.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    the Associated Press; CQ Magazine; The FCC; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; Irish Radio Transmitters Society; Oceania DX Contest; Penn State University; Radio Club of America; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted
    Randall's QSO Radio Show; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's
    all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address
    at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur
    Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.


    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW saying 73 and as
    always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, October 06, 2017 12:32:50
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2084 for Friday, October 6 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2084 with a release date of Friday, October 6 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. India does emergency planning with the nation's
    hams. Pennsylvania preps for a friendly QSO party -- and a Tennessee Net
    does things old school. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline
    Report 2084 comes your way right now.

    (Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

    **

    INDIAN GOVERNMENT TO HELP HAMS' DISASTER PREP

    JIM/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with word that the Indian
    government is giving higher priority to ham involvement. The urgent need
    for amateur radio operators throughout the year in India, especially
    during periods of dangerous weather, has prompted government leaders to incorporate hams into more of their disaster planning. Jeremy Boot G4NJH
    has that report.

    JEREMY: Sometime before the end of the year, the government of the
    Indian state of Pune expects to roll out an effort to efficiently
    coordinate deployment of area ham radio operators through district collectorates during emergencies such as landslides, earthquakes and
    floods and to assist in public safety support during cultural functions
    and religious pilgrimages when traffic levels are high.

    The state's disaster management director Rajiv Nivatkar outlined the
    plan in a recent report in The Times of India, acknowledging that the
    project still is unfunded but officials hope to move it forward by the
    end of the year.

    All state governments have received instructions from the National
    Disaster Management Authority asking officials to allocate agencies and arrange for the training of volunteers.

    In the state of Maharashtra, the initiative is already under way in
    Sindhudurg where district leaders have trained about 20 amateurs for
    such assistance.

    An estimated 50,000 ham radio operators are believed to be active
    throughout India.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (THE TIMES OF INDIA)

    **

    COMMUNICATION STATION MARKS 50 YEARS

    JIM/ANCHOR: Radio transmissions have always been a mainstay of one
    station in western Australia, where communications have occurred in the
    low frequency part of the spectrum for half a century. Here's Graham
    Kemp VK4BB with the details.

    GRAHAM: For 50 years, radio signals have been transmitted at very low frequencies from an antenna array in western Australia, in an area
    covering more than 1 thousand U.S. acres. This is the Harold E. Holt
    Naval Communication Station in the shire of Exmouth. Commissioned in
    1967, it was transferred in 1992 from the command of the U.S. Navy to
    the Royal Australian Navy. Its original purpose was to give the U.S.
    Navy the ability to communicate with its submarines and other vessels in
    the western Pacific and Indian Oceans.

    On the 16th of September, the station marked 50 years of operation in
    which it has and continues to play a highly strategic role in the still-vibrant relationship between the U.S. and Australia, supporting
    both nations' military vessels.

    Exmouth residents and officials marked the event with a full weekend of celebrations since the shire's establishment is so tightly linked to the station's creation a half-century ago.

    The station itself operates with 13 towers where the tallest antenna
    among the array stands nearly 400 meters above ground.

    The station is named for the former Australian prime minister who was
    presumed to have drowned mysteriously in 1967 at the age of 59 while
    swimming off the coast of Victoria.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Graham Kemp VK4BB.


    (WIRELESS INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA, THE WEST AUSTRALIAN)

    **
    ZOMBIE SHUFFLE CONTEST SCARES UP CONTACTS

    JIM/ANCHOR: There's a Halloween-themed CW contest later this month and
    it's frightful fun -- at least that's what we hear from Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    DON: With Halloween only a few weeks away, we have to ask: do you
    believe in zombies? Perhaps when you're on the air you might even be
    mistaken for one. No, that's not an insult - it's the description for a
    highly prized operating method that comes in quite handy during this
    year's Zombie Shuffle on Friday the 20th of October. Zombies, you see,
    don't sprint -- they shuffle - hence the name for this eight-hour QRP
    contest.
    It's designed mainly for North and South American operators using CW and
    it's marking its 20th year of operations among the undead. To
    participate, you'll need to be assigned a Zombie Number, which you can
    obtain free. Visit the Amateur Radio Newsline website at arnewsline.org
    for details and a link to the page.

    Be not afraid! Dust off your key and get out there and scare up some
    contacts.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    LINK: http://www.zianet.com/qrp/zombie/2017/pg.htm

    **
    NETS OF NOTE: MOUNT JULIET SIMPLEX NET

    JIM/ANCHOR: Our next report is part of our occasional series, Nets of
    Note. This week's net meets on 2 meters the old-school way. Simplex!
    Here's Neil Rapp WB9VPG with more.

    NEIL: On this week’s Nets of Note, we take a look at a simplex net near Nashville, Tennessee. Paul Wieloszynski (Will oh zen ski), K4PEW,
    started the Mount Juliet Simplex Net, which has also become a club. The
    Mount Juliet Simplex Society is one of two registered ARRL Affiliated
    Clubs that focus on simplex communications. The idea for the net came
    from Paul’s time in New York.

    PAUL: I got into ham radio and predominantly ended up on repeaters just
    due to the nature of there weren't many places to talk on simplex, nor
    did I give it much thought... that was when I was living in Florida. I
    moved to New York for a couple of years, Western New York, and there was
    just a whole bunch of people talking on simplex. I asked them about
    it. I said, "Why don't you just get on the repeater?" They said, Well,
    we kind of like the privacy. We don’t like the oversight, so to speak.
    It’s not that they were a nasty group of people, but it was just easier
    and simpler just to be on simplex... not bothering anybody else. And I
    liked that concept. I picked it up there, and when I moved to
    Tennessee, I said I think I’ll do the same.

    NEIL: One of the things that makes this net different is that it tries
    to give Simplextons, as they are called, more than one chance a week to participate in a fun net because they are often busy.

    PAUL: Twice a week is when we meet. And if they want to come in twice a
    week, good. If they want to just stop in once a week, good. And the
    joke on the net is that we’re the only net that I know of that gives you chance for two opportunities to miss the net.

    NEIL: Paul says that there are many ways a simplex net can better train
    hams for communicating.

    PAUL: Number 1... I’ve been saying that local simplex nets gets hams to
    a) communicate properly, b) understand who can hear them, c) understands
    who they can hear. It induces them to build better stations. And, it
    builds a local community of hams who are better prepared to serve the community.

    NEIL: The Mount Juliet Simplex Net meets on 146.415 MHz at 8 pm Central
    time on Sundays and Wednesdays, and will soon be changing to Saturdays
    and Wednesdays. You can find out more at their web site, 146415.net.
    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

    **

    K2BSA SCOUTS ACTIVATE 6 STATIONS

    JIM/ANCHOR: There's no rest for Radio Scouts who are busy activating the
    K2BSA call sign at six locations and counting the days until Jamboree on
    the Air. Bill Stearns NE4RD has the details.

    BILL: This week in radio scouting we're just two weeks away from
    Jamboree on the Air. We have 6 activations of the K2BSA callsign
    scheduled during JOTA so far, and here they are:

    Shawn Wolfe, W8SJW, will have K2BSA/3 on from Camp Potomac in Oldtown, MD.

    Elden Morris, N1MN, will have K2BSA/4 on from the Atlanta Area Council Volunteer Service Center in Atlanta, GA.

    Terry Gimble, W5TG, will have K2BSA/5 on from the East Texas Area
    Council in Tyler, Tx.

    Chris Clark, W6CBC, will have K2BSA/6 on from Camp Emerson in Idyllwild,
    CA.

    Craig Morrison, N7MHE, will have K2BSA/7 on from the LDS Stake Center in
    Moses Lake, WA.

    Charles Koehler, N9VJ, will have K2BSA/9 on from the Milwaukee Scout
    Service Center in Milwaukee, WI.

    As of October 1st, there have been almost 1,900 stations registered internationally and 257 of those are in the United States. Please get
    your station registered so that you can be counted and others can find
    you. Icom America has once again this year donated an ID-51A Plus 2 to encourage stations to file their reports after Jamboreee on the Air.
    Everyone who files a report will have their names entered into the
    drawing. We'll open up the reporting system on JOTA weekend. For more information on filing your report, see our website.

    It's probably getting a little too late to be host station at this
    point, however consider helping an existing station in your area or help
    by getting on the radio and working some scouts.

    For more information on Jamboree on the Air or Radio Scouting, please
    visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD.

    **


    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the NI4SR repeater
    in Wilmington, North Carolina on Wednesday nights at 8:30.


    **

    ASTRONAUTS ARE STARS ON NASA TV

    JIM/ANCHOR: Some of the stars in the sky are also on television. Three
    of them are Space Station astronauts -- and two of them happen to be
    hams. Christian Cudnik K0STH has more on this story.

    CHRISTIAN: You think there's nothing on TV? Think again! Tune into NASA Television as well as the NASA website for the latest episode of "hams
    in space." Astronauts Mark Vande Hei KG5GNP and Joe Acaba KE5DAR are
    going outside the International Space Station along with their
    expedition commander Randy Bresnik on the 5th, 10th and 18th of October.
    This is strictly a business trip for the three American astronauts of Expedition 53: they have important station maintenance to do. Check the
    NASA website for local times in your part of the world.

    While Joe and Randy are veterans of a few spacewalks, this will be the
    first for Mark, the flight engineer. Joe will join his two crew
    colleagues on the third and final spacewalk on the 18th.

    You can watch it all at nasa dot gov forwardslash nasalive
    (nasa.gov/nasalive)

    Best of all, there'll be no commercial interruptions.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH

    **

    YOU'RE INVITED TO A PENNSYLVANIA QSO PARTY

    JIM/ANCHOR: It's the second biggest QSO party in the nation and it will
    hit the bands the second weekend in October. Mark Abramowicz (
    Abramo-vich ) NT3V has a preview.

    MARK'S REPORT: The Pennsylvania QSO Party, run by the Nittany Amateur
    Radio Club in State College - the home of Penn State - runs the weekend
    of Oct. 14 and 15th.

    It's earned the label - the "Friendly QSO Party" - because it encourages non-contest stations and first-timers to get on the air and just have
    some fun making contacts.

    In fact, the contesters who do use the PA Party as a tune-up for the CQ Worldwide SSB contest at the end of the month tend to be a little more understanding of the newbies and will slow down for the exchanges.

    Mike Coslo, N3LI, PA QSO Party chairman, says a club whose members have
    a long history of amateur radio contesting will be in charge of the
    bonus station operation.

    "Frankford Radio Club will be our bonus station," Coslo says. "They're
    having their 90th anniversary this year. So it will be multi-station, multi-call sign, multi-county effort."

    And, to mark the occasion, Coslo says the club is going all out to make
    its presence heard on the air...

    "We'll have their base call, W3FRC, and then some special event call
    signs like W3F, W3R, and W3C," Coslo says. "And, this should provide for
    a lot of different bonus contacts."

    The FRC will activate 17 bonus stations in 15 Pennsylvania counties.

    Coslo says, given how propogation is at this time of the year, the 200
    points for each bonus station contact per band, per mode can add up...

    Look up PA QSO Party in a Google search and that will get you right to
    the club's website.

    For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mark Abramowicz, NT3V, in Philadelphia.


    **
    QSOs OF FAITH AND FRIENDSHIP

    JIM/ANCHOR: Ever activate a church or a chapel? A number of amateur
    radio groups around the world believe it's a great way to call attention
    to their churches and the religious community that adds wattage to their
    power of the spirit. Here's more from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: From Belgium to New York State in the U.S., and in a great many counties in the UK, amateur radio operators were sharing their hobby -
    and their faith. Churches on the Air, which is run by the World
    Association of Christian Radio Amateurs and Listeners, is an annual
    global event that makes the world a little bit smaller for a few hours, connecting people of faith via RF signals and antennas. At the St. Ive Methodist Church in Cornwall, Mark M0WMB was among those making contacts
    with Brazil, Kuwait, Mauritania, Saudi Arabia and Morocco on the 9th of September as GB5IVE. In New York, the Peekskill Cortlandt Manor Amateur
    Radio Association W2NYW operated from Old St. Peter's Church in
    Cortlandt Manor, organized by David K2WPM. The New York church was also marking its 250th anniversary.

    As Mark in the UK told a reporter for the Cornish Times, although the
    main purpose of any church is for worship, a ham radio activation also emphasizes the congregation and its importance. [QUOTE] "I believe that
    the church is the people, not the building. We are losing so many of our buildings and it would be good to encourage others to use their church
    for events like ours." [ENDQUOTE]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, in Aiken, South Carolina, I'm Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE.


    (THE CORNISH TIMES)

    **

    TUNISIA LEGALIZES INDIVIDUAL LICENSES

    JIM/ANCHOR: There are some major changes for amateur radio operators in Tunisia as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN's REPORT: In Tunisia, only club stations could once be licensed for amateur radio operations. Now individual Tunisians who pass a qualifying
    exam can get a license of their own -- and those who already have a
    license from another country can operate legally on the air. All of this became possible in September under new licensing arrangements decreed by
    the nation's Ministry of Telecommunications. Resident foreigners are
    also permitted to apply for a license.

    The previous regime had viewed individual ham radio operators
    unfavorably, according to the website of the International Amateur Radio Union. A radio association called ARAT was created by young Tunisians in
    2011 following the Jasmin Revolution. ARAT's recognition by the
    government encouraged other radio organizations to form. ARAT is a
    recognized member of the IARU.

    ARAT is credited with being one of the strongest proponents for
    individual licenses and drafting a document to create the new licensing system. The group discussed with ASTRA, another recognized association
    of Tunisian amateurs, and establishing a rapport with the ministry and
    the National Agency of Frequencies.

    Last month's decree now appears in the Official Journal of the Tunisian Republic and new individual license-holders will soon start appearing on
    the air.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (IARU REGION 1)

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    JIM/ANCHOR: In the World of DX, listen for Roly ZL1BQD using the
    callsign 4W6RR in East Timor. He is on the air until the 10th of October mainly on CW and Digital on 20 and 40m. QSL to the home call.

    Christmas Island is being activated by a group of Australian amateurs
    using the call sign VK9XI until the 10th of October. They are on all
    bands 160 – 10m on SSB, CW and RTTY. Their QSL manager is M0OXO.

    (IRTS)

    **

    KICKER: ROUNDUP BY RADIO

    JIM/ANCHOR: Time to saddle up for our final story which combines ham
    radio and.....horse rescue! For that tale, we turn to Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: It's no secret that hams are good at finding things.
    There are the hidden transmitters deployed in fox hunts. There are
    missing persons at massive public gatherings. And then there is the
    story of Melody the horse. The mare went missing last month from an
    Arizona campground near Sedona where a group of horse owners from
    Phoenix had been staying.

    This called for a very special kind of roundup - one horse and a team of amateur radio operators including those from the Verde Valley Amateur
    Radio Association. The hams learned of the missing equine during their
    regular 7 a.m. meetup on the Knobby Knee Net. Net control op Bill
    Burkett KE7IXS took the radio call from one of the campers, Greg
    LaCrosse K1GRL, and that set the search in motion - not just on the
    ground, but in the air and yes, even in the saddle.

    Jeff Upshaw KC7UYY, a local horseman, rode out to the trailhead with
    other mounted searchers. Mike Mladejovsky WA7ARK flew in with his Cessna Skylane aircraft and took Melody's owner Marcy aboard. The team's search
    had gone into its 10th fruitless hour when finally Marcy spotted her
    horse down below the plane and pilot Mike radioed the searchers on the
    ground.

    Kenny Westmoreland KG7YVM and Jeff hiked to a flat-topped mountain where
    they caught up with Melody and led her to safety. As in all westerns
    with happy endings, they headed off together into the sunset.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.


    (VERDE VALLEY NEWSPAPERS)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    the Associated Press; Churches on the Air; The Cornish Times; CQ
    Magazine; The FCC; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; IARU Region 1; Irish
    Radio Transmitters Society; K2BSA; NASA; Southgate Amateur Radio News;
    Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; The Times of India; Verde Valley
    Newspapers; the West Australian; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.


    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW saying 73 and as
    always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, October 13, 2017 09:15:40
    [QUOTE]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2085 for Friday, October 13 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2085 with a release date of Friday, October 13 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Amateur radio assistance deepens amid Puerto Rico's storm damage. Good preparation serves hams well during Hurricane Nate -- and
    a North Carolina centenarian gets a birthday gift only a ham could love. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2085 comes your way right now.

    (Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

    **
    HAMS CONTINUE POST-MARIA WORK IN PUERTO RICO

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We open with an update on amateur assistance to Puerto Rico. Not quite a month after Hurricane Maria's devastating hit, hams are helping
    to get that struggling island on its feet. Jim Damron, N8TMW has the details.

    JIM: Not all the ham radio assistance going on in Puerto Rico has been happening on the air. The team of amateur radio operators deployed to the storm-wracked island has been able to provide some real boots-on-the-ground
    aid in assessing the supply needs at area hospitals, reuniting families and even installing a mountaintop repeater that now covers more than half of
    Puerto Rico and serves part of the U.S. Virgin Islands. The volunteer team
    who answered the ARRL's earlier call for assistance included Gary Sessums KC5QCN, Valerie Hotzfeld NV9L and Andy Anderson KE0AYJ. Hams have also been busy cataloguing data into the "safe and well" website used by the Red Cross and providing storm survivors with access to satellite phones or cellular service to telephone loved ones with their whereabouts and condition.
    The volunteers' deployment has been further assisted by donations of radios
    and other equipment. Forty Icom handheld radios were donated by El Paso Communications Systems and the Yasme Foundation is making a repeater
    available for installation at the Arecibo Observatory.
    Meanwhile, the Northern California DX Foundation has made a grant of $2,500
    to the ARRL's Ham Aid Fund, which provides resources to hurricane-ravaged regions in the Caribbean and the U.S. The grant will be available for future storm response.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW

    (ARRL)

    **
    NEW YORK SCHOOL CONNECTS WITH HURRICANE MARIA VICTIMS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In one New York City school, teenage hams are also helping Puerto Rico. Skeeter Nash N5ASH has that report.

    SKEETER'S REPORT: For a group of amateur radio operators attending a school
    in Queens, New York, the ham radio shack inside the school building may as
    well have been a classroom. There were big lessons learned there in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

    Amateur Radio Club K2GSG has about 20 student members and the club itself - like the students - is still fairly new to the airwaves, having been founded only two years ago. But the youngsters were ready to step in and help connect people with people on the storm-ravaged island so far from their Jackson Heights neighborhood.

    With the help of their faculty adviser, John Hale KD2LPM, Station K2GSG received messages from concerned family members in the United States and transferred those words to a Radiogram, limiting the message to 25 carefully chosen words. The Big Apple Net and the National Traffic System sent the message out through the system into Puerto Rico for relay to their intended recipients.

    One high school senior, the ham club's president Lea Marie Medina KD2RYU,
    said that sending these important messages has been very much on her mind
    since the storm. [QUOTE] "I think of these messages, I read them and I say
    this needs to be done and that's what I wake up to every morning" [ENDQUOTE] she told WPIX/Channel 11.

    According to local media reports, not only are the messages getting through
    to Puerto Rico but right there in the school, other students in the Queens school are getting a message too: that it's useful and downright cool to be a ham.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.

    (NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

    **
    HAMS MEET THE CHALLENGE OF NATE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Elsewhere, tropical storm Nate built to hurricane force and ARES command centers were prepped, as we hear from Bobby Best WX4ALA.

    BOBBY: Tropical storm system Nate left its deadly mark on portions of Central America; with torrential tropical rains, flooding, and storm surge. The Southeastern U.S. was spared what, in the last hours before landfall, was feared would be a far stronger storm, but amateur radio operators were there
    to offer communications assistance from Nate's unorganized appearance on satellites the southeastern Caribbean sea, as early as October 2.

    Nate was officially upgraded from a trough of low pressure to a tropical depression at 1500 Zulu on October 4.

    Early on, National Hurricane NET station WX4NHC along with hams from Central America and monitoring stations in the States were doing their best to relay both storm reports and calls for help from Central America.

    Nate was upgraded to a minimal tropical storm at 1200 Zulu on October 5th and moved ashore in Nicaragua shortly thereafter.

    By the time Nate had moved off shore and was passing through the very warm waters off the Yucatan, it had already left just under 40 deaths in its wake. By October 7th then Category 1 Hurricane Nate had not only broken the record for the fastest forward moving hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico but weather models continued to change their forecast with almost every update.

    States of emergency were declared for portions the Florida Panhandle, the entire state of Alabama, multiple counties on and near the coast of Mississippi, and multiple parishes of Louisiana.

    These declarations put ARES command centers in all four states, especially Alabama, on alert.

    Alabama Governor Kay Ivey said "Nate was going to be an Alabama hurricane"
    and late fears were predicting that by Saturday afternoon Nate was expected
    to make landfall along a path similar to Katrina in 2005 and Camille in 1969 but as a Category 2 hurricane.

    From my vantage point, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama Tuscaloosa County ARES members manned station WA4EMA at The Tuscaloosa EOC monitoring and relaying traffic from ARES members at the state EOC in Clanton and on the coast in Mobile.

    Fortunately, Nate never reached Category 2 strength and landfall was made
    just before midnight Saturday night in extreme Southeast Louisiana and secondary landfall was made just West of Biloxi, Mississippi at 12:30am
    Sunday as a Category 1 hurricane.

    Nate then rapidly moved North-Northeast in Alabama, but by 10:14 am Sunday morning inland tropical storm warnings were already being canceled in west Alabama as far north as Tuscaloosa.

    In the U.S. it seems damage was limited to high surge waters along the Gulf Coast, inland flooding mainly close to the coast and trees and power lines
    down with just over 100 thousand customers at any given time without power.

    Because of Nate's fast forward movement though and quick downgrading in strength, first responders and power company officials were able to quickly respond and all in the Southeast was very lucky considering late fears.

    ARES members' pre-planned emergency drills and actual deployment, came
    through in great fashion though. S.E.T. drills are what help ARES members to
    be prepared for the real thing, like Nate was.

    The only U.S. deaths reported were; a rain soaked road related traffic
    accident on I-24 in Tennessee and a firefighter struck and killed while cleaning up road debris in North Carolina.

    Reporting from Tuscaloosa, Alabama for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bobby
    Best; WX4ALA.

    **
    ARRL FOUNDATION ACCEPTING SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: If you know a young ham with a promising future, this report
    by Geri Goodrich KF5KRN is for you.

    GERI'S REPORT: If you're a licensed amateur planning to pursue a higher education - or if you know someone who is - you might start thinking now
    about the ARRL Foundation Scholarship program. There are some new
    opportunities and new scholarships for the 2018 award year. More than 80 scholarships are being made available, with funding in the range from $500 to $5,000. Each scholarship has different requirements and qualifications so you'll need to visit the ARRL Foundation Scholarship Program page on the league's website to sort through the list. The new scholarships being offered include the Ladies Amateur Radio Association of Orange County Scholarship,
    the Medical Amateur Radio Council Scholarship, the Harry A. Hodges W6YOO Scholarship and the Old Man International Sideband Society Scholarship, among others. Applicants should complete form available on the ARRL website and
    have until Feb. 15 2018 to send along their most recent academic transcript. Please note, however, that the applications themselves must be received by
    the ARRL by the 31st of January.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    (ARRL)
    **
    PARACHUTE MOBILE'S UP AND ON THE AIR AGAIN

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: You may remember Newsline's report this summer about
    Parachute Mobile's 28th mission held in August. Well, the skydiving, airplane-jumping hams are ready to call QRZ from the clouds again on Mission 29. It's taking place Saturday, October 21 in conjunction with PACIFICON, ARRL's Pacific Division Convention. This time they're going all out, convention-style: In addition to having volunteers at the Drop Zone in California and at the relay location, the team will have a table at the convention site to keep attendees posted on what's happening. If you're going to the convention, check them out. Or if you're going to be on the air, be listening on 20 meters and 2 meters for the big leaps when they happen. For details about the mission, visit their website parachutemobile dot org (parachutemobile.org)

    (ROB FENN KC6TYD)
    **
    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline,
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the 4GS Repeater of the Grand Strand Amateur Radio Club in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, following
    the Sunday night 8 p.m. Net.

    **
    SCHOOL CLUB ROUNDUP? DO YOUR HOMEWORK!

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Are you ready for School Club Roundup? Jump in but, as Neil Rapp WB9VPG cautions us, be mindful of emergency frequencies.

    NEIL'S REPORT: The fall session of the School Club Roundup starts on Monday, October 16th and runs through Friday, October 20th. It's a great chance for schools to get on the air and talk to each other, but it's also a great
    chance to expose young people to ham radio by making contacts with anyone and everyone. So get on the air and listen for schools participating in the roundup. There is one temporary last-minute change being made to the semi-annual event. Due to the number of hurricane-related nets in the
    usually recommended segment on 20 meters, 14.250 to 14.280, School Club
    Roundup sponsors are urging participants to stay clear of these frequencies
    to avoid unintentional interference. So look for schools just above and
    below those frequencies. While the recommended frequencies on other bands should not be affected, staying away from similar nets on other bands is
    still encouraged. As always, be sure to listen first! For more information about School Club Roundup, visit arrl.org/school-club-roundup.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG

    **
    IN WASHINGTON STATE, NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: By the way, there's a rookie in this year's School Club
    Roundup with big dreams. Kevin Trotman N5PRE tells us more.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: There's a new freshman in class at Wahkiakum
    (wuh-KAI-uh-come) High School in Wahkiakum, Washington State. This particular newcomer could not possibly want a warmer welcome. It's the school's new amateur radio club and it has already got more than $3,000 in donated
    equipment from Northwest Aluminum Outfitters and the Wahkiakum Amateur Radio Club N7WAH, which is sponsoring these student hams. The kids have wasted no time in getting on the air and already have contacts in parts of the U.S. and Canada in their log.

    Not content with terrestrial transmissions, however, the youngsters are
    aiming higher. According to Ron W7ERY, a retired teacher, Richard KC4ONA has already begun work with the school district to apply for a contact with the International Space Station that would involve all students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Meanwhile, members are eager to participate in this
    year's School Club Roundup.

    Can the project succeed in a digital age and give kids newfound respect for
    the power of RF? Ron says [QUOTE] "we don't have hope because we are certain! If we do our jobs thoughtfully we will be successful." [ENDQUOTE]

    There's one other certainty here: We here at Amateur Radio Newsline will be listening for these new kids on the block on the air. For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Kevin Trotman, N5PRE, in Aiken, SC.

    (RON WRIGHT W7ERY)

    **
    SILENT KEY: SATELLITE PIONEER PATRICK GOWEN G3IOR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Satellite enthusiasts and others are mourning the death of a major player in AMSAT-UK, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: A pioneer in the world of amateur radio satellites has become a
    Silent Key. Patrick Gowen G3IOR, a cofounder of AMSAT-UK died in August after
    a length illness. Patrick was not only an advocate for satellite
    communications but a polished practitioner of the craft: He was the first amateur to use a low-Earth obit satellite to work 100 DXCC entities. He was also known for his contacts with cosmonauts on board the International Space Station and MIR.

    Pat wrote frequently for the AMSAT Journal and Oscar News and was the
    satellite columnst for Practical Wireless. Pat made especially big news in
    2002 when he detected a beacon sending slow CW on 2 meters, a transmission
    that turned out to be from the Oscar-7 satellite. That satellite, launched in 1974, was long believed to be dead after a battery failure during 1979.

    A resident of Norwich in Norfolk, Pat was 85.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO NEWS)

    **
    WORLD WAR 2 CODE TALKER DAVID PATTERSON DIES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The Navajo nation is grieving the loss of a World War II
    hero, a legendary Code Talker. Mike Askins KE5CXP tells us more.

    MIKE: The United States has lost another World War II hero, David Patterson Sr., a Navajo Code Talker who served in the Marine Corps and made use of his Navajo language on behalf of the military fighting Japanese forces in the Pacific. David Patterson's service between 1943 and 1945 won him the Congressional Silver Medal. The Code Talkers' role during the war was significant; history notes that the Navajo language was the only spoken code never deciphered by the enemy. The Navajo nation announced his death on
    October 8th from pneumonia and complications from a subdural hematoma in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. David Patterson was 94. He was to be buried on the
    military side of Shiprock Cemetery in Shiprock New Mexico.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP

    (KGW.COM WEBSITE)

    **
    A PORTABLE CHALLENGE FOR SUMMITS ON THE AIR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Summits on the Air operators have a challenge on Oct. 21 and it's not the upward climb. Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED's REPORT: Within Summits on the Air participants from time to time plan activities. The next event is to try to get contacts between Europe and the Antipodes. While band conditions are slowly improving allowing home station-to-home station contacts using long path on twenty and forty metres
    and even allowing portable to home station contacts, the most difficult are portable-to-portable contacts and this is exactly what is being planned.

    Stations located on Summits in the UK, Continental Europe, New Zealand, Australia and Japan with simple antennas and low power will be trying to make Summit to Summit or "S2S" contacts. While those using CW or the new FT-8 data mode will probably have some success, the real challenge will be for SSB contacts.

    As always though, even in these low sunspot times, you never know what is possible until you try.

    We wish the best of luck to all taking part in this event on Saturday October the 21st. If you hear someone calling CQ SOTA from about 0600 UTC on the
    21st, why not give 'em a call. I know it'll be appreciated.

    For details of the SOTA award scheme and a link to their spotting cluster SOTAWatch, please go to SOTA dot ORG dot UK.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is SOTA Activator and Chaser Ed Durrant
    DD5LP.

    **
    KICKER: HAPPY SPECIAL EVENT BIRTHDAY OSCAR NORRIS W4OXH

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Our final report is about a once-in-a-lifetime birthday gift
    to a 100-year-old ham. We'll let Paul Braun WD9GCO tell this story of generosity and brotherhood.

    PAUL: Birthdays are like milestones in a person's life. It's a big deal when you turn one year old. Or when you turn 16 and get your driver's license.
    Your first beer at 21. Turning 30 and then 50.

    But not many make it to their 100th birthday. If you do, it is most
    definitely something to celebrate, which was exactly the thought that Dan
    Kern, W-Zero-D-F-U had during a conversation earlier this year on a DMR talkgroup. I talked to Kern about his adventure:

    DAN KERN: Back in, we'll call it April-ish or May of this year, I had made a DMR contact with Oscar Norris, whose callsign is W4OXH, and he was
    introducing himself to me, telling me he's from Gastonia, North Carolina and that in September, he'd be turning 100. Now, he doesn't sound 100 on the air.

    And so I said, "That is awesome! What are you doing for your 100th birthday?"

    He said, "Well, I live here in an assisted-living home and just don't really have any plans." So I think, "Oh, no! This is terrible!" because the call
    that preceded mine, he told the gentleman that he was going to be turning 100 and the gentleman from England said that the Queen either personally calls or sends a letter to their centenarians.

    After hearing that and talking to him, I just felt compelled to do something special not only because he's a fellow ham but also because he's one of our seniors. I contacted ARRL and also got a special-event callsign set aside for him which was November 1 Charlie. He opted for November 1 Charlie meaning to him "Norris 1 Century." He said it was his best birthday present, having his own special callsign.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Kern worked with the local club in Gastonia and arranged to use
    a church hall for the event, with food, friends and radio. Norris was touched:

    DAN KERN: He sat down with me, and he and I were sitting there talking and it was more than just a handshake - he grabbed my hand during the entire conversation he wouldn't let go! He was so tickled that this event came together and that we were celebrating his 100th.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Despite bad band conditions, Kern said they made around 1000 contacts and the event was a success:

    DAN KERN: He was getting calls from all over the world, wishing him a happy birthday and at the very end they took a group picture, and he said his thank-you's and then he said, "Oh! I have one more thing to tell you guys. I just love you all!"

    PAUL/ANCHOR: All of us here at Newsline would like to thank Dan Kern for his thoughtfulness, and a very happy 100th birthday to Oscar Norris! For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE


    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; KGW.COM; New York Daily News; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; Rob Fenn KC6TYD; Ron Wright W7ERY; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York, and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB saying 73 and as always we
    thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.




    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, October 20, 2017 09:47:56
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2086 for Friday, October 20 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2086 with a release date of Friday, October 20 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams step up and give support during
    California's wildfires. Amateur donations help rebuild Caribbean communications after Maria. It's Jamboree on the Air time - and it's
    almost Halloween! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report
    2086 comes your way right now.

    (Billboard Cart Here and Intro)

    **
    CALIFORNIA AMATEURS ASSIST WILDFIRE VICTIMS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Our top story this week focuses on the California
    wildfires. Paul Braun WD9GCO spoke to some hams who found themselves in
    key roles helping the affected communities.

    PAUL: The wildfires in California have burned over 220,000 acres,
    destroyed close to 6,000 structures and have killed over 40 people so far.

    Once again, amateur radio operators have been called in to help with communications support. In the Sonoma area, the Sonoma Auxiliary Communications Service, or ACS, was pressed into duty supporting
    shelters in the Petaluma area. I spoke with Steve Fischer, K6ETA, about
    their role.

    FISCHER: We've coordinated the delivery of over 500 cots, breakfasts
    from the Redwood Empire Food Bank and many donations and volunteer
    offers that the public has been generously bringing forward. Those sorts
    of efforts actually can cause as much confusion as they can help, so we
    helped do the triage and get the logistics folks just what they needed.

    PAUL: The head of the main local food bank is also a ham, and he's been working with ACS:

    FISCHER: David, W9FOG, has been working with us over the local repeaters
    to coordinate very large food deliveries. Actually the very first
    morning they had their act together and were ready to serve breakfast to
    all the new evacuees, so we had to coordinate with him and find out what facilities they had at each of the shelters and line it all up.

    PAUL: Part of ACS's function is to coordinate with community support:

    FISCHER: The community at large was very helpful. We were the link
    between the Salvation Army and the Petaluma logistics team. The Marin
    RACES folks, our colleagues to the South, offered mutual aid and helped
    us track down information about overflow when our evacuation shelters
    reached max. Our logistics team needed information about the Marin
    shelters and didn't have access to it. We used our contacts at Marin
    RACES to answer those questions.

    PAUL: According to Fischer, even when primary communications are still
    online, there is a place for amateur radio:

    FISCHER: The ACS is usually a secondary or tertiary communications
    channel and usually we're called in when all else fails. So, we're sort
    of the effort of last resort. But in this case, we had all of our
    Internet and cell phones working. However, we were still needed to fill
    in any gaps that existed due to the situational awareness challenges of
    having multiple fires.

    PAUL: The weather forecasts show possible rain moving into the Napa
    valley, so hopefully the fires will finally be extinquished. But the
    cleanup and recovery efforts will be ongoing and, as always, amateur
    radio operators will be there. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul
    Braun, WD9GCO.


    **
    REBUILDING COMMUNICATIONS IN DOMINICA

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The ham radio community is known for its generosity
    and right now no one knows that better than residents of storm-hit
    Dominica as we hear from Bobby Best WX4ALA.

    BOBBY: The damage done by Hurricane Maria's powerful punch continues to
    ripple through the Caribbean where the long process of repair and
    restoration enters its second month. Amateur radio organizations, manufacturers and donors are rallying around Dominica, where the ham
    radio capability was virtually wiped out by the storm. The effort is
    being led by the Yasme Foundation, the Foundation for Amateur
    International Radio Service, Yaesu USA's Amateur Division, and a group
    of private pilots who are also hams, including Brian Machesney K1LI,
    Dave Bridgham N1AHF and Brian Lloyd WB6RQN.

    More than $30,000 worth of ham radio equipment has been deployed to
    Dominica, where hams are now working with the Dominica Amateur Radio
    Club and the National Telecommunications Regulatory Commission in
    Dominica to set up the stations and train new operators so Dominica is
    better prepared in future emergencies.

    Meanwhile, in another part of the Caribbean, post-Maria conditions have prompted the cancellation of the 2018 ARRL Puerto Rico State Convention,
    which was to be held on January 26th through 28th in Hatillo. Organizers
    said the coliseum that was to be the convention's venue was too badly
    damaged to be ready in time.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Bobby Best WX4ALA


    (ARRL)


    **
    TWO MORE UK LICENSE EXAMS GO ONLINE

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: If you're in the UK, you can soon look forward to a
    new option for taking your license exams, as Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us.

    JEREMY: Get ready for more online licensing tests in the UK. The Radio
    Society of Great Britain has given the OK for Foundation and
    Intermediate licensing exams to be administered online. The action comes
    on the heels of positive feedback from exam centers, clubs and license candidates following the online launch of Full examinations this past
    March. Now, starting November 1st, applications will be accepted by the society's exams department for intermediate exam-taking online. The application process will begin on January 2nd of next year for online
    exams for Foundation licenses.

    Of course, this doesn't mean you can take your test in the comfort of
    your own home. Like paper exams, these online counterparts must still be overseen at designated exam centers with the same level of supervision.

    The Radio Society calls the decision a win-win in that it reduces
    paperwork on their end and gives more immediate results to test-takers
    waiting to hear their fate.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (WIA)

    **

    SIRENS GO OFF BUT IT'S ONLY A TEST

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Planning and drilling for emergencies is one of the
    things amateurs do best. A group in Arizona is getting ready for their
    turn as we hear from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: Imagine a meltdown at a U.S. nuclear power plant. Hopefully
    that's all you may ever need to do - imagine it - but a group of hams in Arizona are taking it one step further next month by simulating a
    meltdown or other accident by testing the warning sirens that alert the
    public near the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. On November 8th,
    a team from the West Valley Amateur Radio Club, the Tri-City Amateur
    Radio Club, Arizona ARES and other hams will be stationed at 58 sirens
    going off during the test. David N7TWT, who has been at the helm of this mandatory exercise since 2007, says he is counting on some dedicated volunteers - husbands, wives, retirees and others - to show up as usual
    with their 2 meter radios at the starting point, Buckeye Municipal Airport.

    DAVID: We start going out at 10 in the morning to get to the sirens and
    it takes til almost noon to get everyone on the sirens covered. We will
    do a countdown "10.....9...." and we wll count down and then they turn
    the sirens on. Within a few minutes you hear all the sirens going off.
    They go for about three minutes and then they stop. If a person calls
    into me and says "my siren did not go off," we do some troubleshooting
    and do some checking and then we set it off again at 12:30 and if it
    goes off at that time, we can diagnose what's going on.

    CARYN: The public is notified well in advance that it's only a test. As
    for the hams, they start their day early coordinating with the Maricopa
    County Department of Emergency Management and other offices. They get
    water and earplugs during the exercise -- and afterward they get a real
    nice thank you.

    DAVID: Oh yeah, a nice meal from Dillon's! It's catering - they come
    out. APS always comes out with nice thank you gifts every year for the
    people who come out and do it. They don't restrict me as to how many
    people come out. If I have 10 or 15 extra people they don't care, they understand because it's difficult. Some people may just go out together because they know I have extra people. Most people say we can still do everything we need to do and and enjoy the day.

    CARYN: Another group of hams doing good public service work. Sirens
    aside, everyone seems to have a real blast. For Amateur Radio Newsline,
    I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The test is one of many around the U.S. relying on
    amateur radio participation near nuclear power plants. Another one is scheduled for the Limerick Power Plant in Pennsylvania which will take
    place on Nov. 14, coordinated by the Reading (REDDING) Radio Club.

    **

    FCC TO FINE NY MAN $400,000 FOR INTERFERENCE

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The FCC has announced that it will be assessing a
    $400,000 fine against a New York City man who they said has failed to
    respond to an April Notice of Apparent Liability from the agency. The
    FCC action against Jay Peralta of Queens, New York, was prompted by
    malicious interference on police radio frequencies, including false
    distress calls and false bomb threats. The agency said the 20-year-old admitted to the interference, which the FCC said occurred between April
    and August of 2016. Peralta is presently in custody on related charges
    and is awaiting trial. He and two other men were arrested in the fall of
    2016. The FCC said that the Justice Department will begin collection proceedings if no payment is received within 30 days.

    (ARRL)

    **

    BREAK HERE

    Time to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline, heard
    on bulletin stations around the world including The W8GK repeater in Charleston, West Virginia on Sundays at 8:30 p.m. after the ARES Net,
    during the KARC Club Net, following check-ins.

    **

    UK REPEATER GROUP SHUTTING DOWN NETWORK

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: In the UK, one repeater group is calling it quits and
    Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us why.

    JEREMY: The decision to close down a repeater is never taken lightly so
    when the South Yorkshire Repeater Group elected recently to close the
    seven repeaters in its network, the move was unprecedented. The group's announcement, which was also made on its Facebook page, said that it was simply unable to continue service at the level it has maintained for a
    number of years. The seven stations to cease operations include four
    D-Star repeaters, one Fusion repeater and two analog voice repeaters. In making its decision, the group said it hoped that interested parties
    might have the time or funding to take over operation of one or more of
    the repeaters and encouraged them to write them at comms at southyyorkshirerepeatergroup dot co dot uk (comms@southyorkshirerepeatergroup.co.uk

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTH YORKSHIRE REPEATER GROUP)

    **
    AT LAST, JAMBOREE ON THE AIR

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The worldwide event Scouts have been waiting for just
    lit up the calendar between Friday October 20th and Sunday October 22nd. Here's Bill Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in radio scouting is all about this weekend on
    the air and on the internet. Jamboree on the Air starts Friday October
    20th and goes through Sunday October 22nd. Over 3,300 stations from all
    over the world will be getting scouts on the air. This event will go throughout the weekend so expect a lot of young voices making their way
    to your station while tuning around the scouting frequencies. In
    addition to voice traffic, expect a lot of these scouts to experience
    the various digital modes that amateur radio provides.

    Since we're mentioning digital modes, we did have one concern reported
    about the new FT8 frequency on 17 meters overlapping the existing PSK31 frequency on that band. Remember that these are suggested frequencies,
    so feel free to tune the dial a little bit to give yourself some
    separation on that band.

    In addition to K2BSA being on the air in all the call districts, we're
    hearing from our neighbors overseas about their operations. VK3CUB from Australia will be on the air with the Bendigo District Scouts in
    Longlea, Victoria. SC�UT and SC�JAM from Sweden will be on the air with the RadioScouts of Stockholm. ST60JOTA will be on the air from Sudan
    with the Sudan Technological Scouts. What a great opportunity to connect
    with youth all over the world using Amateur Radio.

    The internet will also be busy with scouts on October 21st for Jamboree
    on the Internet. Scouts will be busy chatting with other scouts through
    IRC, Skype, Teamspeak, and other modes of internet-based communications.

    If you haven't registered your station yet, head over to our website and follow the instructions for station registration like the other 437
    stations in the U.S. have done.

    For more information on JOTA and Radio Scouting visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD.

    **
    VIRGINIA AMATEUR CONFIRMED FOR DEFENSE POST

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: David Trachtenberg, N4WWL, an active member of the
    Pentagon Amateur Radio Club, has been confirmed by the Senate for a
    position in the Department of Defense. The 60-year-old radio amateur has served in other posts within the department and in his new post will be principal deputy undersecretary of Defense for Policy. David lives in
    Burke Virginia and is president and CEO of the national security
    consulting company based there, Shortwaver Consulting LLC. He is also Northeast Division Director and national planning coordinator for the
    U.S. Air Force Military Auxiliary Radio System.

    (ARRL)

    **
    CHINESE SPACE LAB ON CRASH COURSE WITH EARTH

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Look out below! Well, maybe. China's space laboratory
    is headed toward Earth, as we hear from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM: The Chinese space laboratory Tiangong 1, launched in 2011, is on a
    crash course with Earth, according to a Harvard astrophysicist, Jonathan McDowell. He said he expects that the decay in the space station's orbit
    to bring it back to earth later this year or perhaps in early 2018.

    Communications was lost with the spacecraft last year and by all
    accounts, there is apparently no way to halt the crash landing.

    At the time of its launch, the Chinese had hopes that Tiangong 1 would
    serve as a symbol of that nation's abilities in space and solidify its
    status there as a superpower. The Chinese space agency used the
    spacecraft for a variety of missions, some of them manned, and had
    referred to space lab as the "Heavenly Palace." One of the scientists to
    work aboard the space lab was, Liu Yang, China's first female astronaut.
    She was on board in 2012.

    The spacecraft is expected to break up upon entering the atmosphere,
    with some of the resulting debris weighing as much as 100 kilograms or
    220 pounds. The Chinese have assured the United Nations that there is
    only a remote chance that anyone will be harmed by the debris.

    For Amateur Radio Newslie, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.


    (THE INDEPENDENT)

    **
    THE WORLD OF DX

    Be listening as the Liberia Radio Amateur Association hosts three IOTA enthusiasts between the 30th of October and the 3rd of November for the
    first activation of Baiyah Island, a new IOTA designation, AF-111. Col
    McGowan MM0NDX will operate as EL2EL; David Deane EI9FBB will operate as
    EL2BB and Jeremy Sheehan EJ5GM will operate as EL2GM. This is described
    as the first Islands on the Air operation from the island. The
    DXpedition call sign will be 5L3BI.

    A special event station is operating from October 20th through November
    20th, marking the 79th anniversary of the death of Mustafa Kemal
    Ataturk, the founder of the Turkish Republic. Listen for operators on
    all the HF bands using CW, SSB and the digital modes. A bronze, silver
    and gold diploma will be available. The 10 call signs will include
    TC10A, TC10F, TC10T, along with numberous others.

    On Mauritius, Jean-Paul HB9ARY will be active as 3B8HC between the 4th
    and 18th of November, working holiday style. Find him on 80 through 6
    meters, though he will concentrate on 80, using mainly SSB. He will also
    work some slow CW. QSL via NI5DX direct.

    If you want to work Kuwait, be listening for Abdallah, 9K2GS who will be operating from there in the CQ WW DX SSB Contest on the 28th and 29th of October. He'll be using the call sign 9K2K. QSL via Logbook of the World
    only.


    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: ON THE WATCH FOR SASQUATCH

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Our final story was just made for Halloween. It
    involves amateur radio operators deep in the woods - and a monster known
    as Bigfoot. Here's Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE: Now here's a Halloween question for hams: When you're operating
    out in the wild, sitting around a campfire and telling ghost stories
    while pursuing good signal reports, what do you need more than favorable
    band conditions? How about.....bravery?

    It's the 50th anniversary of a documentary film that is said to have
    captured footage of the Bigfoot monster at Bluff Creek, Oregon. The controversial 1967 account by Bob Gimlin and Roger Patterson is the inspiration behind the Bigfoot Radio Net Expeditionary Team's sojourn
    this month into the woods of southeastern Oklahoma. The hams will be
    calling QRZ on the HF bands, wondering about the likelihood of good copy
    by Sasquatch himself.

    Maybe the melting Smores will draw him out into the open? Or maybe the
    smell of good campfire coffee? Look for details about the team's
    adventures and keep current on their operating frequency on their
    Facebook Page. Then listen for them on the air. The Bigfoot Radio Net's
    field operation begins October 23rd. It runs through the 28th....at
    least unless Bigfoot has other plans for them. It is, after all, almost Halloween.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP in Shawnee, Oklahoma

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    the Associated Press; CQ Magazine; The FCC; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; the Independent; K2BSA; the Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; South
    Yorkshire Repeater Group; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    We also close this report by also offering congratulations from all of
    us at Amateur Radio Newsline to our colleagues at the ICQ Podcast, which
    just completed its 250th edition, and the SolderSmoke podcast which just marked its 200th. Well done, and we wish you many more 5 and 9 reports
    on your shows.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved


    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org





    <*>Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT:


    <*> 1 of 1 File(s)
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ARNEWSLINE/attachments/693161597;_ylc=X3oD MTJxdmM1YmM3BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzI3MDE3NTEEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDA3NzA5BHNlYw NhdHRhY2htZW50BHNsawN2aWV3T25XZWIEc3RpbWUDMTUwODUwNzAzMw--
    <*> news.mp3

    ------------------------------------
    Posted by: James KB7TBT <kb7tbt@gmail.com>
    ------------------------------------


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, October 27, 2017 11:33:20
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2087 for Friday, October 27 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2087 with a release date of Friday, October 27 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams in Ireland tackle a historic hurricane -
    yes, hurricane! Jamboree on the Air is in the log books now -- and the
    DX world loses a mainstay who becomes a Silent Key. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2087 comes your way right now.

    (Billboard Cart Here and Intro)


    **
    HAMS CHECK IN DURING HISTORIC STORM IN IRELAND

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with yet another hurricane
    report. This historic weather didn't hit the Caribbean but landed
    instead in Ireland where ham response was informal but effective. We
    hear those details from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: The names Ophelia and Brian won't be forgotten for quite
    some time in Ireland. The two storms swept over the nation in
    mid-October with Brian coming on the heels of its deadlier counterpart. Ophelia's arrival generated Ireland's first severe weather alert in
    history and according to the Irish Independent newspaper, even created
    the biggest wave recorded off the Irish coast during a weather event. It
    also left three dead.

    Although the Amateur Radio Emergency Network was not formally called up
    for the storm, members nonetheless took to internet chat and whatever repeaters they could find or made use of simplex calling channels, to
    check on the well-being of people in their communities and beyond. John
    Ronan EI7IG told Newsline the hams had earlier tracked the storm and
    advised AREN members to prep for water shortages, outages and to get
    their GO-Kits ready just in case.

    He told Newsline in an email that once the storm subsided the hams were
    able to power up their generators and make use of batteries on hand to
    conduct health and welfare checks. He said some Winlink messages were
    also exchanged with Raynet members in the UK. John said extended power
    outages plagued the south and southeast of Ireland. According to Reuters
    news service, Ophelia stranded more than 300,000 businesses and homes in Ireland without power. The nation's power regulator called it an
    unprecented situation.

    A few days later, when the storm called Brian rolled in, hams and others braced for the worst. It was a tough storm -- but it was nothing like
    Ophelia.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (REUTERS, JOHN RONAN EI7IG, IRISH INDEPENDENT)

    **
    PUMPKIN-WATCHERS PUMPED FOR PATROL

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the horrors of Halloween is the mischief that can do
    real damage in the form of pumpkins tossed on busy highways. That's when vigilant hams can help - like this group in Indiana, which Jack Parker
    W8ISH shares with us from the Amateur News Weekly podcast.

    JACK'S REPORT: In Johnson County, members of the Mid-State Amateur Radio
    Club are making plans for their annual Pumpkin Patrol. For over 25 years
    the club has provided lookouts on all of Interstate 65's overpasses
    running through Johnson County. The hams agument the sheriff's road
    patrol on Beggars' Night by securing the overpasses from any tricks the treaters might have in mind. To date there have not been any reports of
    any debris being thrown on I-65 in Johnson County. Coordinator Dave
    Daily KB9LOT hopes this year will be another non-smashing success!
    Reporting for Amateur News Weekly, this is Jack Parker W8ISH.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A similar effort has been going for years as well in New
    York State where amateurs assist troopers' patrols on the overpasses of
    the New York State Thruway. For more news of the Indiana-Ohio-Kentucky
    area visit the website of Amateur News Weekly at amateurnewsweekly.com

    (AMATEUR NEWS WEEKLY, UPSTATEHAM.COM)

    **
    REPORTING IN FROM SCOUT JAMBOREE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: With this year's Jamboree on the Air in the log books now, stations have other work to do, as we hear from Bill Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL's REPORT: This week in radio scouting we need to turn in our
    station reports for Jamboree on the Air. This year we had a total of
    over 12,600 registered stations around the world for JOTA and this
    included 1,000 in the US topping last year's number of 500. Now is the
    time to file your report. This simple two-page online web form includes
    your station information, a bit about the numbers at your event, a
    couple comment boxes for feedback on the event and a place to submit
    pictures and videos. Don't worry if your numbers aren't 100%, as I know
    I had to piece together mine from logs, team members, and some scribbled notes. Just like a cub scout, do your best.

    Now that you have submitted your station report, it's a great time to to
    meet your volunteers and debrief the team. How did things go? Did you
    have the right gear? What was the most valuable piece of gear at the operation? Were there any issues with flow through the stations? Did the weather present any issues? And the ever important question, did we
    spend enough time planning?

    As you answer these questions with your team, take time to visit our
    website and check out our planning guides for Amateur Radio Operators,
    Scout Leaders and our Countdown planner. We'd like to hear your feedback
    on what we can do better to help you plan and execute your radio
    scouting events in the future.

    For JOTA station reports and information on radio scouting, please visit
    our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    (K2BSA)


    **

    AMSAT PREPS FOR NOVEMBER LAUNCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The launch of a new satellite is almost here. Geri Goodrich KF5KRN tells us about the plans to send the Fox-1 satellite into orbit
    in California.

    GERI's REPORT: They're counting down the weeks at AMSAT until the next
    Fox-1 satellite goes up. It's called RadFxSat and its date with Earth's
    orbit is the 10th of November. The satellite will be carrying a 435/145
    MHz FM transponder when it takes off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California as one of four CubeSats riding as secondary payloads on board
    the Joint Polar Satellite System.

    The satellite features a Fox-1 style FM U/V repeater with an uplink on
    435.250 MHz and a CTCSS of 67 Hertz. The downlink is on 145.960. The
    "DUV" subaudible telemetry stream will be used for downlinking satellite telemetry as well as telemetry from its study on radiation effects on commercial components. FoxTelem software can be used for decoding.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    **
    TROPHY AWARDED TO ARISS INTERNATIONAL CHAIRMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: There's more satellite news - this time from the UK - and
    it's all about honors being given to one key amateur radio operator
    involved in the program. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: The AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium had a full
    agenda when it took place earlier this month in Milton Keynes, England.
    There was one item on its otherwise well-planned agenda however that
    took one amateur by surprise: Frank Bauer KA3HDO, international chair of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, was presented with the
    Ron Broadbent G3AAJ Trophy which honors amateurs for their contributions
    to satellite communications.

    ARISS itself had received the Ron Broadbent Trophy last year noting the
    work of its UK team during the Principia Mission of astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI.

    The trophy is named for its donor who became a Silent Key in 2005 at the
    age of 80.

    Earlier this year, Frank Bauer was chosen to receive the 2017 Amateur of
    the Year Award at the Dayton Hamvention.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (ARRL, AMSAT-UK)


    **

    SILENT KEY: PUBLISHER CARL SMITH N4AA

    PAUL/ANCHOR: DXers and readers of two publications about DXing are
    marking the loss of a Silent Key who as a publisher provided guidance to
    many. Heather Embee KB3TZD has that story.

    HEATHER's REPORT: The publisher of DX Magazine and QRZ DX has become a
    Silent Key. Carl Smith N4AA, who was a noted DXer as well, had been a
    licensed amateur since his earliest days in 1954 in Kansas City,
    beginning with the call sign WN0YFT. An Air Force veteran, Carl became
    W4NQA when he first moved to North Carolina. In 1997, Carl and his wife
    Miriam KB4C took their love of DXing one step further by purchasing DX Publishing, the parent company of both publications.

    Having made it to the top of the DXCC Honor Roll, Carl was inducted into
    the CQ DX Hall of Fame in 2012.

    After Miriam Smith became a Silent Key, he established the KB4C Miriam
    Smith Award to honor western North Carolina hams who demonstrate a
    commitment to public service and emergency communications.

    Carl helped found the Western Carolina Amateur Radio Society and
    established the annual Asheville Hamfest. He had also owned and managed
    an amateur radio store in Asheville and was a founder of the
    SouthEastern DX and Contesting Organization's W4DXCC Convention, which
    uses Miriam's call sign on the air for special occasions.

    Carl Smith was 77 when he died on October 20.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    (ARRL)


    **

    BREAK HERE:
    Time for you to identify your station.
    We are the Amateur Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including the W0EF repeater in St. Louis Park, Minnesota on
    Saturdays at 9:30 a.m.

    **
    THERE GOES THE TELEGRAPH, AFTER ALL THESE YEARS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The FCC has just stopped enforcing some of its rules. Can
    you guess why? Skeeter Nash N5ASH fills us in.

    SKEETER'S REPORT: When you think of an older, outmoded form of
    communication that may well have been rendered useless by telephone and,
    of course, email, texting and the web, what comes to mind?

    If you answered "the telegraph," consider yourself in the same mindset
    on the issue as FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and the rest of the commissioners
    in Washington. The last Western Union telegram was sent in 2006 in the
    U.S., and barely four years ago - in 2013 - the commission stopped
    enforcing rules relative to the telegraph.

    Now those regulations are scrapped altogether. This is the commission's
    way of removing what it considers unnecessary rules and giving the
    agency greater efficiency. Or in the words of the chairman
    himself, it was [quote] "just a matter of good housekeeping." [endquote]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)

    **
    HAM TV PROJECT CONNECTS WITH AUSTRALIA

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Australia, one amateur got a bit of a surprise when he
    caught up with a live HAM-TV transmission from the International Space Station. John Williams VK4JJW tells us more.

    JOHN'S REPORT: Now here's a QSO to remember: Picture Tony Hutchison
    VK5ZAI, an Australian ground station for the Ham TV Amateur Television Project, in communication with Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli
    IZ-Zero-JPA. The contact was made in mid-October in the first live
    HAM-TV transmission to be received in Australia from the International
    Space Station.

    It's not so hard to picture, actually, even though Tony himself didn't
    expect any images to come through He told the Wireless Institute of
    Australia that the video transmission was a total surprise as the ISS
    made its low-elevation pass over Australia. He thought at most he would
    get a black screen - but there was Paolo, rehearsing for an interview he
    was to have later with the Italian Red Cross. Tony immediately grabbed
    some still imagery from the screen and also made a video recording.

    The recordings have since beeen sent to other HAM-TV equipped ground
    stations in Australia as well as Europe. That's sure one fancy QSL card.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.


    (WIA)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX be listening for Alain/F5OZC and Sebastien/F8DQZ
    operating as 3XY3D from Kassa Island, Los Islands between the 2nd of
    November and the 1st of December. Hear them on 80-10 meters using
    mainly CW. QSL via F5OZC.

    In Micronesia, Shu, JA1FMN, will be active as V63PSK from Weno Island,
    also known as Moen Island, from the 14th to the 18th of November. Shu
    will be working holiday style on 20-10 meters
    using JT65, JT9, FT8 and PSK63. Listen mainly between 1700-0200z. QSL
    via JA1FMN, by the Bureau, direct, eQSL or ClubLog's OQRS.

    You can hear Saty, JE1JKL, in East Malaysia, active as 9M6NA from Labuan Island during the CQWW DX CW Contest November 25th and 26th. QSL via his
    home callsign or LoTW.

    John, W2GC, will be active in Aruba as P40W between November 20th and
    28th. John will be active in the CQWW DX SSB Contest on October 28th and
    29th as well as the CQWW DX CW contest November 25th and 26th. Outside
    of the contest, be listening for John on CW on 160/80m and 30/17/12
    meters, with 160 meters on the hour and 80 meters on the half hour. QSL
    via LoTW or direct to his QSL manager N2MM. John does not accept bureau
    cards.

    A reminder: It's just a littlel more than 250 days to the World
    Radiosport Team Championship and the organizers would still welcome
    donations. If you feel you can help please go to www.WRTC2018.de for
    details of the event and how you can donate.

    **

    KICKER: COMMERCIAL STATION GOES BAREFOOT AFTER THE STORM

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, here's one more storm story as hurricane season
    starts to wind down. This story, however, isn't about rescue by amateur
    radio - rather, it's about a commercial radio station that stayed alive
    as a Florida hurricane raged, as we hear from Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    DON'S REPORT: As the Atlantic hurricane season enters its final weeks,
    we celebrate a special victory: the power of nature versus the power of
    100 watts. Hurricane Irma may have slammed Florida on September 10 but
    it was no match for the largest commercial shortwave radio transmission facility in the United States. Radio Miami International, WRMI, survived
    even though its 100,000-watt operation and its impressive array of 68
    towers and 23 antenna systems got knocked off the air.

    That's not the end of the story, though. Ham radio operators who work
    barefoot will appreciate what happened next. According to a report in RadioWorld, general manager Jeff White said the station wasn't silent
    for long. Operating around the clock from inside a reinforced concrete building, WRMI was able to stay on the air with the use of a 25-kilowatt diesel generator, a 100-watt transmitter and a dipole. Yes, one heroic
    dipole.

    Equally impressive was the much-lower-power station's continued capacity
    for international reception with reports from as far away as parts of California and Canada. Well things are back to normal now, and we wish
    our 100,000-watt friends at WRMI good fortune and of course, good DX.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    (RADIOWORLD)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; AMSAT-UK;
    the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the Irish
    Independent; John Ronan EI7IG; K2BSA; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; RadioWorld; Reuters; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show;
    WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO saying 73 and as
    always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, November 03, 2017 11:17:34
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2088 for Friday, November 3, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2088 with a release date of Friday, November 3, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams in Pennsylvania and California give
    priority to disaster preparedness. In the UK, the last of the Bletchley
    Park listeners has died -- and Jordan prepares to launch its first
    CubeSat. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2088 comes
    your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    SPECIAL REPORT: DISASTER PREPAREDNESS ON CAMPUS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We open this week's newscast with a three-part special
    report on disaster preparedness. You've heard these past few weeks about amateur response to the challenges of Atlantic hurricane season. But
    what about earthquakes or even a nuclear power plant accident? Neil Rapp WB9VPG starts us off with the story of how a college radio club is
    teaching students to prep for the worst.

    NEIL'S REPORT: Ham radio is alive and well on the campus of California
    State University-San Bernardino, as California prepares for potential earthquakes, loss of electricity and other disasters. Located directly
    on the San Andreas fault, students in the CSU-SB amateur radio club are working on several projects tying together disaster assessment,
    communications and of course... radio. Dr. Vincent Nestler, KK6WJU, is the sponsor of the group and a professor of cybersecurity at the school. The
    club has several projects, like detecting Bluetooth signals under
    collapsed buildings to estimate the number of people that need to be
    rescued. He tells us about some of the other projects.

    VINCENT: We have a disaster preparedness project where we have students
    that are practicing "grid down." We have a tent with a generator, a
    small computer that acts as a server to collect up all the data and
    charge up radios. We're working on some cool stuff like getting the
    school as part of the broadband mesh that's out here. Again, if the grid
    is down and we can keep the mesh up, that allows us to have digital communications in real time. One of the cooler things we're trying to do
    is, in our simulation of grid down is, send up drones. One drone will
    have a relay doing cross-banding. So that this way we whoever can hit
    the drone from line of sight will be able to communicate further and
    maybe get to the repeater that they may not be able to get to otherwise.
    So we want to send out drones to survey the area, send that information
    back via the broadband mesh, so that anybody that's on the mesh can see
    that video. We can send up the drone and have it show real time footage
    of... ok this building collapsed; this building is on fire.

    NEIL: The club has licensed around 30 people. Vincent says that the time
    for ham radio is now.

    VINCENT: There's never been a better time for ham radio to get big. Why?
    Two hurricanes, category whatever four and five, gone through Puerto
    Rico... that whole island is a case in point, right? You have, you know,
    the shooting in Las Vegas. Ham radio may not necessarily be the case for
    that exactly... but... the world is on fire, right? You got the crazy wild fires in [northern California]. The shooter was shooting people. At what
    point are they going to be shooting power grids? You know, terrorism
    strikes. So people are starting to understand that we're going into
    crazy times and that little extra bit of security where it's like... OK,
    even if everything shuts down, I have a radio and I can get to people
    and people can get to me. Now's the time to push that... to say, look. The world is on fire. Get a ham radio, get licensed, and learn how to
    communicate so that if you need it, you'll have it.

    NEIL: Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG

    **
    SPECIAL REPORT: DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IN RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Now what happens if the amateurs happen to be older - a
    whole lot older - than college students? There's a very unique team of
    trained hams helping to safeguard their California community too - and
    it include retirees well into their 90s. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT has
    that story.

    CARYN'S REPORT: The operators of amateur station AI6PV are not your
    typical rookies. In fact, many have waited a lifetime - a long lifetime
    - to get their tickets. These hams are in their 70s, 80s and even their
    90s. Their shack is hardly typical either: It's located at Plymouth
    Village, a continuing care retirement community on a sprawling 37 acres
    in Redlands, California.

    Keith Kasin AI6BX, executive director of Plymouth Village, said the
    3-year-old station started with a singular mission.

    KEITH: We got into it a lot for the disaster preparedness. We live right
    on top of the San Andreas Fault so we kicked a lot of it off as part of
    our emergency communication for the disaster preparedness team. People
    have taken to it and they are doing more of it on their own. I have had residents come to me and say "I am getting ready to take a trip to see children or grandchildren. Can you help me identify some repeaters along
    the way?"

    CARYN: The 32 licensed hams are part of a 64-member resident disaster
    response team connecting to staff administrators as well as area
    hospitals, city agencies and other organizations. Whether they live independently on the grounds or receive nursing or assisted living care, almost every resident can have a role.

    KEITH: Most, yes, are in the residential area but here's one of the best
    ones - and to me, this is a great success story - about how amateur
    radio kept someone socially connected to his friends: He had a situation
    and needed to go to our skilled nursing facility and he became a
    permanent resident there. He took his HT and he would be rolling down
    the hallway in his wheelchair talking to friends on the radio. His great-grandson would come in and say 'Great grandpa, what's that? Tell
    me about it' and he would get him engaged. This is someone who had been licensed years ago when he was a storm chaser and relicensed when he got
    to our community. It is disaster preparation, it is a new social
    engagement. I have heard residents calling each other to set up a game
    of ping pong on their radios.

    CARYN: The hams have begun upgrading their licenses and studying to
    become Volunteer Examiners. Others spend time DXing on HF. Meanwhile,
    other facilities including Plymouth Village's sister locations in
    Arizona and Washington State are interested in replicating the model.
    His advice?

    KEITH: Find a couple of residents if you can who were hams and would be interested in getting back into it. Look for those retired from the
    military who were radio officers -- and make it fun.

    CARYN: Amateur station AI6PV: making it fun and keeping it safe. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT

    **
    DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: BRACING NEAR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For the final part of our report, we look to Montgomery
    County, Pennsylvania, where hams are gearing up for a drill this month
    to ensure safety surrounding a local nuclear power plant. We hear more
    from Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER'S REPORT: In Pennsylvania, the Reading Radio Club is preparing
    to take part in the Limerick Power Plant Exercise on Tuesday, Nov. 14th
    and is looking for 18 to 24 radio operators to assist, starting at 5
    p.m. The Limerick Generating Station in Limerick Township, Pennsylvania
    is a nuclear power plant that can produce enough electricity for more
    than 1 million homes - but its presence also produces concerns about
    public safety in the surrounding 10-mile emergency planning zone.

    The amateur radio club provides communications support for these tests
    every two years. Since the exercise covers a number of different municipalities, the club is hoping to have two or three hams stationed
    at each location, as well as some assigned to the Montgomery County EOC.
    Hams who are participating for the first time will be paired up with an amateur who has assisted in the exercise before. Food will be provided
    at each location.

    For more details, send an email to Don WA1ELA at joni hyphen don at att
    dot net (joni-don@att.net). Joni is spelled "j o n i."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    **
    DEATH OF A BLETCHLEY PARK 'LISTENER'

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A woman who used her mastery of Morse Code to help make
    World War II history has died. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us her story.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: One of the heroic Bletchley Park "listeners" of World
    War II has died. Alison Robins, who taught herself both Morse Code and
    German during the war and intercepted messages from U-boats around the
    coast of Britain, was instrumental in passing along those messages to
    Allied codebreakers at Bletchley Park. Her assignments placed her at
    various coastal listening stations.

    She was described in various newspaper reports as the last surviving
    secret listener of that era.

    Alison had been in the Women's Royal Naval Service during the early part
    of the war and also worked at the Royal Naval College.

    Her daughter Jill Hazell told the Mirror newspaper that the Royal Navy
    Wren spoke very rarely about her wartime experiences, which involved monitoring communications late into the night. Her husband, Maurice, who
    also spoke German was sent to that nation before the Nuremberg Trials to
    help with translations.

    Alison Robins was 97. She died on the 15th of October in the Westbury
    Nursing Home in Bristol where she was receiving care for dementia.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (FORCES NETWORK, THE MIRROR, DAILY MAIL)

    **

    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the W6ZN Repeater Group in Palomar Mountain, California on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m.
    local time.

    **

    JORDAN'S FIRST CUBESAT GETS FINAL TOUCHES

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Jordan, student scientists and ham radio operators will
    share a historic "first." Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us about this
    ambitious project.

    JIM'S REPORT: Jordan's King Hussein, call sign JY1, was one of the
    world's most notable radio amateurs whose list of on-air contacts
    included Columbia shuttle astronaut Owen Garriott W5LFL the first ham in space. So it's perhaps a fitting tribute that the late monarch's call
    sign is about to go back on the air - literally - it will be launched
    into space. Jordan is preparing to send up the Cubesat JY1-SAT, its
    first miniature satellite. The satellite is the creation of a team of 19 engineering students working at various universities in Jordan under the supervision of the Crown Prince Foundation. The satellite will be
    launched in early 2018 and is designed to communicate with earth
    stations as well as broadcast various images of interest to tourists.

    During a visit to the Nanotechnology Institute recently to help oversee
    the finishing touches on JY1-SAT, Crown Prince Hussein was able to
    record an audio message that will be carried by the tiny Cubesat and
    broadcast once it is in space.

    King Hussein became a Silent Key in 1999 but amateurs can now look
    forward to a contact that is also a tribute.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    **

    HAM RADIO BECOMES 'VANDERKLOOF DAM RADIO'

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Throughout November, the resort region surrounding the Vanderkloof Dam in South Africa is going to be busier than usual - with amateur radio activity. John Williams VK4JJW has the details.

    JOHN'S REPORT: Get ready to celebrate the Vanderkloof Dam in the
    Northern Cape of South Africa. The dam is marking its 40th anniversary
    with the help of the Bo-Karoo Amateur Radio Club. The club will be on
    the air as Special Event station ZS40VDK from November 1st until the
    30th. The dam which was commissioned in 1977 was originally known as the
    PK Le Roux Dam and is fed by South Africa's largest river, the Orange
    River. It's the second-largest dam in the country and boasts the highest
    wall among dams in the nation - 108 meters, or more than 350 feet high.

    There is, of course, an off-the-air celebration too - a big party at the Sandgat Resort just outside the town of Vanderkloof on Saturday the 18th
    of November. But there will be no QSL cards for that.

    Meanwhile, if plans hold for the month of November, the special event
    honoring the dam can count on a nice big flood - of HF contacts, that is.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (SARL)


    **
    SPAIN GIVES HAMS 60 METER ALLOCATION

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Good news for hams in Spain. The new National Frequency Allocation Chart shows that amateur radio operators have been given the
    new global 60 meter allocation on a secondary basis. The frequencies are 5351.5 - 5366.5 MHz. Hams in Spain are also getting additional 50 KHz of
    space on the 70 MHz band. The operating frequencies now are
    70.150-70.250 MHz. The state's official newsletter carried the news on
    Friday, October 27.

    (SOUTHGATE)


    **
    HIGHEST AWARDS FOR 2 FROM CW OPERATORS CLUB

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The CW Operators Club, an advocate for the continued use of
    Code by amateurs worldwide, has just presented honors to two recipients
    who carry on the tradition. We hear more from Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The CW Operators Club is an international group that believes it's all about the Code. With that in mind, the group has
    announced that this year's recipients of its CW Ops Awards for Advancing
    the Art of CW are the Boy Scouts of America and Roger Cooke G3LDI.

    The Scouts are being recognized for the various programs the
    organization has run throughout the years encouraging youngsters to
    develop an interest in Morse Code.

    Roger Cooke, author of the book "Morse Code for Radio Amateurs" is being recognized as the GB2CW coordinator for the Radio Society of Great
    Britain and for his commitment to teaching Morse Code to other amateurs.
    His book is in its 12th edition.

    The award is one of several given by the CW Operators Club, which
    promotes the use of Morse Code in ragchewing, contesting and DXing.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.


    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    THE WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for Robert DL7VOA will be using the
    call sign V34AO from Hopkins in Belize between the 18th and 30th of
    November. He will be operating holiday style on the beach, mainly using
    CW during the local evening and nighttime hours. You may be able to hear
    him as well on SSB. Be listening for him especially during the CQWW DX
    CW Contest November 25th and 26th. Robert would be very happy to receive recordings of his transmissions in MP3 at DL7VOA dot DE. Send QSLs via
    DL7VOA, by the Bureau or direct.

    Be listening through the 10th of November for two Canadian amateurs
    operating as VY0ERC from the Eureka Amateur Radio Club station on
    Ellesmere Island. The island, which is in the northernmost part of
    Canada, counts as NA-008 for the Islands on the Air award program. The
    hams will be operating from inside the Eureka Weather Station. QSL
    M-ZERO-OXO OQRS or Direct Mail.

    Thomas, OZ1AA is operating until November 7th as 4W/OZ1AA from East
    Timor. Listen for him on 40-10 meters using mainly CW and some FT8. Send
    QSLs via OZ1ACB, ClubLog's OQRS or LoTW.


    (OHIO-PENN DX NEWSLETTER)


    **
    KICKER: SLOW-SCAN EXPERIMENT A TV HIT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, let's consider the value of something manmade
    versus something natural: in this case, let's consider the aurora. Kevin Trotman N5PRE tells us about a recent aurora that truly deserves to have
    its name up in - what else? - lights.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: When it comes to the real thing versus its artificial equivalent, is it OK to accept a substitute? For the team at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program in Alaska, the answer is most certainly YES. Ham radio operator Christopher Fallen KL3WX and a team of technicians at the research facility, known as HAARP, experimented a few
    weeks ago with the creation of an artificial aurora, using an array of
    180 antennas. The aurora, known as radio-induced airglow, was a
    challenge to create, given the cloudy environment at the time. He set up
    two video cameras that work a low-light environment and hoped for the
    best. He even tweeted his intentions hoping amateur radio operators
    would tune in. Then he began transmitting images within the radio wave
    and watched his Twitter feed come alive as radio listeners responded
    from such places as Pueblo, Colorado and Victoria, British Columbia.

    The Slow Scan TV experiment, reported in the IEEE Spectrum journal, was proclaimed a success. One of the images returned to Chris, that he had
    sent earlier was an image of the logo of the University of Alaska,
    Fairbanks, where he is an assistant professor in the Geophysical
    Institute. After this, he can feel a bit like a star of Slow Scan TV too.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.
    (IEEE SPECTRUM)


    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly;
    AMSAT-North America; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; the Daily Mail; the FCC;
    Forces Network; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; IEEE Spectrum; Irish
    Radio Transmitters Society; the Mirror; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; South
    African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO
    Radio Show; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, November 10, 2017 09:44:52
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2089 for Friday, November 10, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2089 with a release date of Friday, November 10, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The Baker Island DXpedition gets a big boost.
    Morse Code averts a boating tragedy -- and Pope Francis makes a heavenly contact - via satellite feed! All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2089 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART HERE

    ****
    BIG BOOST FOR BAKER ISLAND DXPEDITIONERS

    JIM/ANCHOR: If you like chasing DX -- really challenging DX -- our top
    story this week is for you and it comes to us courtesy of the HamTalk
    Live podcast. Here's Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

    NEIL'S REPORT: A team heading to Baker Island for a DXpedition in June
    just received a major boost. The team of eleven people will be heading
    to the Pacific to the small island located between Hawaii and Australia
    for the first activation since 2002.

    DON: Baker Island is currently number four on the wanted list, and it's
    going to be number three on the list after the folks going to Bouvet get
    done.

    NEIL: Like most DXpeditions, the expenses for the trip are extensive.

    DON: Any large, far away place requires a lot of money because it's a
    long sail from anywhere. All your equipment has to be frozen, has to be
    be purchased new. We are not taking any chances of bringing any
    invasive species or new bugs onto the refuge. We hope to make lots of
    Qs. So, when people work us and request a QSL card, they put in a
    little tip for our good efforts. We just started the fundraising
    because we only got permission to go a couple of months ago, and then we
    had to negotiate with the Fish and Wildlife Service on the actual
    operating conditions and had to find a boat.

    NEIL: The cost of the trip is in excess of $430,000. Team members are
    paying for about half of the cost, while the other half must come from contributions from individuals and foundations. A major donation was
    just announced last week by team leader Don Greenbaum, N1DG on Ham Talk
    Live!

    DON: We've applied to the Northern California DX Foundation for
    support. They let us know this morning that we will be receiving a
    grant of $75,000. To put that into perspective it's the second largest
    grant ever given by NCDXF, the biggest one being $100,000 to the
    upcoming Bouvet. So we're honored they had so much faith in this group
    that the wallets were opened in quite a substantial way.

    NEIL: For more information about the KH1 Baker Island DXpedition or to
    make a contribution, be sure to visit baker2018.net and their Facebook
    group.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG

    (HAM TALK LIVE)

    **

    JAMBOREE STATIONS START REPORTING IN

    JIM/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, radio scouts are back on the air as results pour
    in from the recent worldwide Jamboree on the Air, as we hear from Bill
    Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in radio scouting we have one activation from
    Scout Camps on the Air and we check up on our Jamboree on the Air Reports.

    BSA Troop 20 Amateur Radio Club, WS5BSA, will be on the air from John
    Nichols Scout Ranch in Mustang, Oklahoma, on Saturday November 11th from
    8am to 5pm Central Standard Time. They will operate SSB on 40m through
    10m, and VHF/UHF FM on the WX5LAW and KB5LLI linked repeater systems throughout the day.

    With over 12,000 locations registered for JOTA-JOTI world-wide,
    including an astonishing 990 from the United States, we need reports
    from all those locations to determine the number of Scouts, amateur
    radio operators, and guests, in attendance.

    Here's a couple of the great reports we've received so far:

    William Mitchell, W0WMM, from their station from WoodSmoke in Gibson
    Island, Maryland, reports that the scouts enjoyed DXing and making
    contacts with Spain, Argentina, Brazil and the UK. The highlight of the
    event was when they talked to scouts on the Nuclear Submarine Savannah
    in the Baltimore harbor.

    Jeremy Brown, KA7BIF, with the K7MVA activation from the Snake River Boy
    Scout Council in Twin Falls, ID, reported that this was their first
    time doing JOTA and that they had a blast and can't wait for next year.
    With the local Council's help it was a success and we helped 22 boy
    scouts earn their Radio Merit Badge.

    For more information on radio scouting and to file your JOTA report,
    please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **

    COMMEMORATING A DOOMED GREAT LAKES FREIGHTER

    JIM/ANCHOR: Two special event stations have been marking a Great Lakes
    tragedy that happened 42 years ago. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has that story.

    KEVIN's REPORT: It's a tragedy that still captures the American
    imagination: the sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald 42 years ago in the storm-tossed waters of Lake Superior. The entire 29-person crew was lost
    on November 10th 1975 shortly after the Great Lakes freighter passed the
    Split Rock Lighthouse. Minnesota's Stillwater Amateur Radio Association
    kept the HF bands busy November 3rd, 4th and 5th as operators made
    contacts from Split Rock Lighthouse State Park during a Special Event
    Station that it has organized for 13 years.

    Hams who missed making contact with W0JH get to try again, though.
    Special Event Station W8F is also commemorating the sinking. In
    Michigan, the Livonia Amateur Radio Club's station goes on the air on
    Sunday, November 12th at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Belle Island
    in Detroit. Even if you're not able to work W8F on that Sunday, stay
    tuned to the HF bands anyway. Members of the club are operating from
    their own QTHs and keeping the Special Event Station going right through
    the 20th of November.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline in Aiken, South Carolina, I'm Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE.

    (STILLWATER ARA; LIVONIA ARC)

    **
    MORSE CODE TO THE RESCUE

    JIM/ANCHOR: Another boating story - one that didn't end in tragedy -
    comes to us from Jeremy Boot G4NJH. It happened in late October.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: Now here's a twist on the saying: "When all else fails, there's amateur radio." This version says: "When all else fails, there's
    Morse Code."

    A yacht sailing off the coast of Cornwall recently was observed as being
    on a collision course with the Dales rocks which are submerged at high
    tide and not visible. The rocks posed a definite risk for grounding. A watchkeeper at the National Coastwatch Institute at Bass Point, however,
    could not reach the crew. They did not have an Automatic Identification
    System beacon and could not be reached on VHF radio to be warned of the
    danger ahead.
    The watchkeeper turned to an old relic - an Aldis lamp, which emits
    pulsing light, and he flashed the crew a Morse Code message - the letter
    "U" - which warns of danger. The craft had come within 10 boat lengths
    of the rocks when it was seen to respond by changing its course to head
    south where it resumed its journey to Falmouth.
    Bass point NCI station manager Peter Clements was quoted in news reports afterward as saying that such flashing lamps are more commonly seen
    these days in vintage movies about the Second World War. But in this
    case, an old wartime tool turned out to take on a hero's role in
    peacetime too.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (CORNWALL LIVE)

    **
    SILENT KEY: MARIO AMBROSI I2MQP

    JIM/ANCHOR: The president of the Italian radio association and a CQ
    amateur Hall of Famer has become a Silent Key. We hear more from Ed
    Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Hams are grieving the loss of a noted DXer and active
    member of Italy's amateur radio community. Mario Ambrosi I2MQP has
    become a Silent Key. Mario, who was inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio
    Hall of Fame in 2005, was president of the ARI - the Italian amateur
    radio association. He had a lifelong love of radio that began at age 14
    when he heard the first Sputnik satellite broadcasts using homemade
    equipment.

    On Oct. 25 1975 Mario made his first QSO - that was just the beginning.
    At the time of his death he had logged more than 222,000 QSOs in 352
    countries and collected numerous top awards, including those given for operation in CW and RTTY.

    Mario had been president and secretary of the A.R.I. - the Italian radio amateur association - a director of Radio Rivista, a writer for the DX
    News Bulletin and a QSL card checker for the DXCC and WAS programs of
    the ARRL as well as several programs for CQ Amateur Radio.

    Mario Ambrosi died on November the 6th. Vale Mario I2MQP.

    JIM/ANCHOR: Thanks for that report Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (FILIPPO RICCI IK7YCE)


    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the Lookout
    Mountain Amateur Radio Club's W4EDP Repeater in Chattanooga, Tennessee,
    on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.


    **
    HONORING VETERANS ON THE AIR

    JIM/ANCHOR: If you want to thank military veterans for their service to
    the U.S., be listening November tenth through twelfth for this special
    event station. Paul Braun WD9GCO tells us how.

    PAUL's REPORT: Most of us enjoy a good special-event station. And when
    it's tied into something remembering our veterans, it makes it even more special. This weekend, Wentzville, Missouri will be on the air
    celebrating a historic event, as organizer Larry Scantlan, KE-Zero-KZ
    tells us:

    LARRY: I live in Wentzville, Missouri, which is just West of St. Louis
    proper, and back in 1967, December - I want to say the 12th, I believe,
    they erected the very first Vietnam War memorial.

    PAUL: Scantlan saw an opportunity to tie ham radio into the celebration:

    LARRY: The city of Wentzville is planning a commemorative celebration of
    that accomplishment hosted by the VFW Post 5327, and so I saw that as a
    great opportunity to partner with them as ham radio operators knowing
    how hams love special events. And since I myself am a Vietnam veteran I thought it was a perfect marriage, if you will.

    PAUL: The station will be on the air as W-Zero-W starting on Friday the
    10th, through Sunday the 12th working as many of the HF bands as they
    can, primarily single-sideband with other modes if they have enough
    operators. Scantlan sees this as not only fun for hams, but also as a
    way to build public awareness of our hobby:

    LARRY: It is drawing a lot of public attention - we expect to have all
    three TV stations covering this. We're also opening this up to the
    public to let them come through and see ham radio in action. For me, I
    think that's the critical element because I think we need to do a lot
    more promoting of ham radio in the public sector.

    PAUL: You can find out more on the event's QRZed page. Here's a chance
    for a fun new contact, and a way to help celebrate an important event remembering our veterans and their sacrifices for our country. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO.


    **

    A MIGHTY MICROWAVE ACHIEVEMENT

    JIM/ANCHOR: One ham in South Africa has truly gone the distance -
    achieving a record contact on microwave. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF has more.

    JIM MEACHEN's REPORT: South African amateur Alex Artieda ZS6EME feels
    like he's in the record-books - and indeed he is, at least in the
    microwave record books. Alex logged the first microwave EME QSO from
    South Africa on 10 GHz in a contact with HB9Q in Switzerland on October
    22nd. Alex was operating QRA64D, a new digital mode, on 50 watts. That
    was only the beginning for him. The very next day Alex was able to make
    10 more EME QSOs on the same frequency. One day later - on the 24th of
    October - Alex was on the air again at 5.7 GHz and completed the first
    Digital EME QSO with PA3DZL in the Netherlands. His good fortune
    continued and he had 7 more QSOs after that. Making note of his
    achievements, the South African Radio League proudly announced that Alex
    was "putting South Africa back on the world microwave map."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    (SOUTH AFRICAN RADIO LEAGUE)

    **

    TEEN INSPIRES SCHOOL'S ASTRONAUT CONTACT

    JIM/ANCHOR: Thirteen-year-old Dhruv (DROOVE) Rebba (REH-BAH) KC9ZJX and
    his father Hari (HAH-ree) VU2SPZ are hams who know that sometimes you
    have to try more than once to make a coveted contact. The eighth-grader
    and his father were among those who worked for two years to help Chiddix Junior High School in Normal, Illinois get selected for a QSO with the International Space Station.

    According to Dhruv's former science teacher, Daniele Hopper, the school applied to the ARISS program at the urging of father and son when Dhruv
    was in the sixth grade. It didn't happen. Undaunted and undiscouraged,
    the two reached out to the Central Illinois Radio Club W9AML, the
    Challenger Learning Center at Heartland Community College and the
    Children's Discovery Museum and this year - success!

    The contact with astronaut Joe Acaba (Uh-COB-buh) KE5DAR happened on
    Oct. 23. Hopper called it a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the
    school and the district. She said Dhruv worked many hours with Grant
    Zehr AA9LC of the Central Illinois Radio Club and was on the planning commmittee for the big event for two years.

    As for Hopper, she ended up with a lesson from Dhruv in what ham radio
    is all about and, she siad, she hopes his classmates will be inspired to
    go for their licenses too.

    (DANIELE HOPPER, WGLT RADIO)

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    Nuri, TA3X will be active as TC630MECCA from Izmir, Turkey from the
    first of November to the 14th of January 2018. He will operate CW, SSB
    and digital modes on 160 to 10 metres. QSL via TA3X, direct or bureau.

    Rob N7QT is leading a team of 9 radio operators from Mellish Reef in
    Australia as VK9MA through the 16th of November. The team will be active
    from Heralds-Beacon Islet, the only permanent land in the reef on all
    the HF bands, using SSB, CW and RTTY. The operators ask all amateurs to
    please note that they are always going to be working split. Send QSLs to
    N7QT.

    Get ready! November the 18th sees the next annual Europe to North
    America SOTA Summit to Summit event where SOTA activators will be out on
    both continents trying to make contacts. Look for stations to be spotted
    on the SOTA Cluster at SOTAWATCH dot ORG between around 12 and 1500 UTC
    on the 18th. and give the activators a call, they appreciate all calls.
    We are hoping for better propagation conditions for this weekend where
    both SSB and CW stations will be heading up some hills and mountains for
    the event.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: PAPAL 'VISIT' TO THE ISS

    JIM/ANCHOR: Students aren't the only ones who get excited to talk to the
    Space Station. Mike Askins KE5CXP tells us about one recent contact that
    was blessed - truly blessed - by good fortune.

    MIKE'S REPORT: It's a given that when Pope Francis has some big
    questions to ask about life and the universe, he looks to the heavens.
    That's just what he did on October 26th, in fact - and he got some
    answers - only this heavenly exchange didn't come from the source you
    might imagine. The pontiff got a chance to chat via a satellite feed
    with the six astronauts on board the International Space Station and his questions were understandably tough. Like the rest of us, he was seeking
    to understand humanity's place in the universe - but these were
    challenges that space travelers such as Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, and Joseph
    Acaba KE5DAR could only take a stab at from a scientific point of view.

    NASA'S Randy Bresnik, the Expedition 53 commander, told the Pope,
    however [audio clip]: "People cannot come up here and see the
    indescrable beauty of the earth and not be touched in their souls."

    With this exchange, Pope Francis became the second pope to speak with astronauts, following Pope Benedict in 2011.

    Paolo, of course, did take the opportunity to make a kind of confession. Humbled at not knowing all the answers to the pope's questions he said
    "our aim here is to spread knowledge [but] the more we learn the more we realize we do not know."

    So together, they will all continue to look to the Heavens.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (SPACE.COM)


    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; Cornwall Live; the
    CQ Magazine; Daniele Hopper; Filippo Ricci IK7YCE; HamTalk Live; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; Irish Radio Transmitters Society; K2BSA;
    Livonia Amateur Radio Club; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; South African Radio
    League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Space.com; Stillwater Amateur
    Radio Association; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; WGLT public radio; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston, West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, November 17, 2017 10:00:32
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2090 for Friday, November 17, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2090 with a release date of Friday, November 17, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A court dismisses a defamation suit against the
    ARRL. A pioneer of software-defined radio dies -- and a Special Event
    station in India prepares to honor a 19th century "father of wireless."
    All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2090 comes your way
    right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    COURT DISMISSES HAM'S SUIT AGAINST ARRL

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In our top story, a federal appeals court has ruled in a defamation lawsuit filed against the ARRL. Kent Peterson KC0DGY has
    those details.

    KENT: A U.S. district court has dismissed a defamation lawsuit filed
    against the American Radio Relay League by its former Eastern
    Pennsylvania Section Manager Joseph Ames W3JY. The suit was filed last
    year after an article appeared explaining his dismissal in June of 2016.

    The Third Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on the 13th of November found
    the ARRL's contention to be true -- that the Malvern, Pennsylvania
    amateur had improperly conducted disaster planning directly with the
    Federal Emergency Management Agency. The ARRL said Joseph Ames had
    violated ARRL bylaws which state that the league is responsible for its
    own representation with government agencies such as FEMA. The ARRL
    argued that the arrangement was thus unauthorized.

    According to the court papers the three-judge panel found [quote] "Ames treated NTS like a separate entity from ARRL by making decisions on
    policy issues, issuing press releases, doing government advocacy and
    giving NTS volunteers the false impression that NTS is separate from
    ARRL." [endquote]

    Ames had been chairman of the ARRL National Traffic System's Eastern
    Area when he was voted out by the executive commmitte. He had sued the
    ARRL and three of its officers. The NTS was created by the league in 1949.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY


    (LAW 360, ARRL, U.S. COURT OF APPEALS THIRD CIRCUIT)

    **

    SOFTWARE PIONEER VANU BOSE DIES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The man behind the first FCC-certified software-defined
    radio has died. We hear more from Jim Damron N8TMW.

    JIM DAMRON's REPORT: The chief executive of the first company to be
    certified by the FCC for software-defined radio died suddenly in
    Massachusetts on Nov 11. The death of software executive Vanu Bose was announced on the website of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
    where he was an alumnus and member of the MIT Corporation. Bose's
    company Vanu Inc., uses technology he developed while a graduate student
    at MIT and now provides wireless infrastructure around the world.

    The company also used its technology for humanitarian causes, most
    recently assisting with communications in Puerto Rico following the devastating hurricane.

    In 2004, Bose's company made news when it won the first FCC approval of
    Vanu's Software Radio GSM Base Station, which was capable of being
    modified without changes to its hardware. It was heralded as a major
    advance in wireless communications.

    Vanu Inc. was also the developer of cellular repeater stations capable
    of running on solar power, enabling communications in remote areas of
    the world, including developing countries.

    He was the son of the late Amar G. Bose, was the founder of the Bose Corporation.

    Vanu Bose died of a pulmonary embolism. He was 52.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Damron N8TMW

    (MIT)

    **

    FUNDRAISING A TOUGH NUT TO CRACK

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Want a creative way to raise money for your club's needs? Squirrel away this idea, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE: What gets busy every fall collecting nuts with an eye toward
    saving for the future? If you answered "squirrels," you'd be right, of
    course. But if you answered the "Cleveland Amateur Radio Club" you'd be
    right too. The club recently completed its big annual fundraiser - the incredibly popular nut sale considered its primary way to raise money
    outside of membership dues. The sale was launched several years ago by
    Edith Derrick KG4BDQ, now a Silent Key, and her husband Bill KF4OZO, the club's treasurer and it has become a family tradition in their honor, according to Buddy Kimsey WA4NIV, who has been Nut Chairman for the past
    two years.

    Indeed, the 42 offerings seem as hard to resist as a flea market at a
    hamfest: cashews, walnuts, chocolate-coated nuts, spicy and salty nuts
    and the top-seller, pecans. Enthusiasm builds right up into the weeks
    before Thanksgiving. Buddy said 630 bags were pre-sold and 108 extra
    bags were ordered and the club is expecting a sellout!

    The nut money goes toward a good cause: The hams are looking to expand
    their existing club house, an expense expected to run about $100,000. Meanwhile business has been brisk, said Buddy, as both hams and non-hams
    have been placing their orders. Now if only they can capture that
    squirrel market....

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.
    **

    NETS OF NOTE: THE TYPOCHONDRIACS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In this next report, we present the latest in our
    occasional series "Nets of Note." Paul Braun WD9GCO introduces us to a
    net especially for fans of CW and, of all things, old typewriters.

    PAUL: Hams, by and large, have a fascination with old gear. We spend
    hours and untold amounts of money restoring and using 70-year-old rigs.
    We wax rhapsodic about the warm glow of tubes. We converse in Morse Code
    using World War II-era telegraph keys.

    So, we should easily identify with a group of people that love to write
    things on the word-processing equivalent of a Heathkit DX-100b - the
    manual typewriter. And there is an HF net dedicated to just that - The Typochondriacs Net. I recently spoke with Fred Beihold, NV1N, about the
    net:

    BEIHOLD: Well, I was reading Richard Polt's website and he wrote the
    book "The Typewriter Revolution" - he's just really into manual
    typewriters. And I still had my manual typewriter from college, and I
    read about these gatherings all over the world where people get together
    at cafes and type on manual typewriters. I talked to a ham on 40 meters
    on CW and he said the only two items left from his original station were
    his manual typewriter and his telegraph key.

    So I thought "why not combine the two?" I'm a traffic handler, and I
    always thought a RadioGram looks best when it's typed up on a manual typewriter on an official RadioGram form - looks really smart.

    So I started this about two years ago and I haven't done much with it
    but recently I picked up the ball again and I'm looking for some ways to
    stir up some interest for this. I think it has two goals that it could
    achieve - it could be fun and it could really serve a useful purpose.

    PAUL: The net meets on the third Thursday of the month at 8pm Eastern
    time on 7054 Kilohertz. I asked Beihold about how the net would run:

    BEIHOLD: To start with, just a little bit of ragchewing - not too much -
    and we'll go from there. Anybody can join - I mean, we might even
    provide services to people who don't care at all about manual
    typewriters - but the net will be tailored to serve the manual
    typewriter crowd.
    PAUL: So, if you feel like getting together with some fellow vintage
    gear junkies, the Typochondriacs Net might just be for you. For Amateur
    Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO.

    **
    NEW EDITORS AT NATIONAL CONTEST JOURNAL

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There are new voices and a new guiding hand at the ARRL's National Contest Journal as we hear from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: A new editorial team will be guiding the editorial
    content of the ARRL's National Contest Journal beginning with the January/February 2018 issue. Dr. Scott Wright, K0MD, an active contester
    and DXer from Rochester, Minnesota, will be taking over as editor.

    Scott will be joined by Fred Regennitter K4IU as Deputy Editor. All of
    the contributing editors will remain and there will be several new
    ones: Amateur Radio Newsline's own Neil Rapp WB9VPG, host of Ham Talk
    Live, will serve as “Next Gen Contesters” contributing editor. Dr. John Thompson K3MD will serve as Contributing editor for Contest Surveys and
    Book Reviews and the past Editor Pat Barkey N9RV will remain doing
    periodic interviews and feature stories.

    Congratulations everyone!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    **
    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the Greensboro
    Amateur Radio Association's W4GSO repeater in Greensboro, North Carolina
    on Sunday evenings following the 8:30 p.m. net.

    **

    THE NATURE OF HAM RADIO IS....NATURE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: As summer approaches in Australia, John Williams VK4JJW
    gives hams there a good reason to get out of the shack.

    JOHN's REPORT: If you are in Australia, let nature be your radio shack
    on the weekend of November 25th and 26th. Those two days mark VKFF
    Activation Weekend for the World Wide Flora and Fauna program. Amateurs
    are being encouraged to activate parks throughout VK land and sharpen
    their abilities to operate portable while drawing attention to the parks.

    Hams who want to activate one of the designated parks should email
    vk5pas at wia dot org dot au (vk5pas@wia.org.au) with all the specifics
    of the planned activation so your station can be included in the
    registry being compiled. According to the WWFF Australia website,
    calling CQ from a designated park can almost surely guarantee a pileup.

    Parks should meet event criteria, however. For details on how to
    activate a park and for more information about registering, visit the
    website wwffaustralia dot com (wwffaustralia.com) Most of the parks in
    the program are national parks but there are, of course, exceptions.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm John Williams VK4JJW

    (WWFF AUSTRALIA)

    **

    NETHERLANDS REPORTS A DECLINE IN NEW LICENSEES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In the Netherlands, the tally for new licensees is down but officials are not discouraged, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: Fewer new hams are getting on the air in the
    Netherlands. That's the latest report from the Netherlands Radio
    Examination Foundation. The latest figures for applications and
    successful candidates for the Novice and Full licenses both declined.
    The years compared were 2015 and 2017. According to VERON president Remy Denker PA3AGF, who spoke at the Radio Amateur Day in Apeldoorn on Nov.
    4, there were 322 new amateurs registered in the Netherlands in 2015 - a figure that has declined to 270 in 2017.

    Remy Denker kept his message upbeat however and said that even small
    numbers of hams can do their part for large-scale promotion for Dutch
    amateur radio. He encouraged licensed radio amateurs to serve as
    good-will ambassadors and share the hobby with friends and acquaintances.

    His advice: Spread the word.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **
    CW ACADEMY OPENS FOR YOUNG AMATEURS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Guess what? Kids think Morse Code is cool. Now there's a
    resource helping them learn how to be "Morse Cool" and it's free, as we
    hear from Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The successful CW Academy Program run by the CW
    Operators Club has launched some new coursework aimed specifically at
    young radio amateurs. The club's online Morse Code classes for young
    hams will be taught free to hams between the ages of 11 and 19 who live
    in the U.S. and Canada. Students who sign up will be grouped with other
    hams their age in their time zone and will be trained over Skype. The
    club will even try to find volunteers who live near the students' QTH to assist them with rig and antenna set-up where needed. This is a pilot
    program but the club is very optimistic. Carl Davis W8WZ told Amateur
    Radio Newsline in an email that the club has discovered that lots of
    young amateurs enjoy CW and embrace it as if they were learning a second language or a musical instrument. Carl said that he conducted a code demonstration at a recent Scouting Jamboree on the Air and the
    youngsters showed tremendous enthusiasm for something that didn't
    involve keyboards and screens for a change. That is the success they
    hope for with this CW Academy.

    Registration begins the 15th of November and runs through the 15th of December. Classes begin in January. To register, send an email to k6rb58
    at gmail dot com (k6rb58@gmail.com) and include first and last name,
    call sign and license class, age, time zone, email address and phone
    number.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB

    (CW OPERATORS CLUB)

    **
    SPECIAL EVENT STATION HONORS JAGADISH BOSE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: A Special Event station is about to get on the air in India honoring a 19th century scientist who played a major role in wireless.
    Here's Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM MEACHEN'S REPORT: Born the 30th of November in 1858, Bengali
    physicist Jagadish Chandra Bose would no doubt appreciate this special
    event station. Datta VU2DSI will be on the air using the call sign
    AU2JCB from the 23rd of November to the 11th of December marking the anniversary of the birth of the scientist considered by many around the
    world to be the "Father of Wireless."

    The 19th century innovator's many accomplishments include development of Galena crystals for making radio receivers and the discovery of 1
    centimeter to 5 millimeter radio waves, such as those used in satellites
    and radars.

    His demonstration of wireless radio in 1895 predates the more publicly recognized one credited to Italy's Guglielmo Marconi whose demonstration
    came two years later.

    Honoring India's scientist, Datta will operate on both the HF bands as
    well as in FM mode on 6 meters and 10 meters. Send QSL cards directly to VU2DSI.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    **
    MORE FREQUENCIES FOR HAMS IN ARGENTINA, COLOMBIA

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There's more room for more QSOs on the bands! Hams in
    Argentina have something to celebrate: Local communications authorities
    have granted new privileges on the bands on 630 meters and 60 meters and extended existing allocations on 160 meters, 80 meters and 30 meters.
    Radio Club Argentino made the announcement following final approval and
    said the changes will be effective in February 2018.

    In Colombia, hams are getting access to part of the band on 2200 meters,
    630 meters and 60 meters. The announcement was made this month by the Colombian Radio Society, a member of the IARU.

    (RADIO CLUB ARGENTINO, COLOMBIAN RADIO SOCIETY)


    *
    THE WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for Argentinian DXers on San Andres
    Island in the Caribbean operating through the 26th of November as 5K0T.
    The IOTA reference for San Andres is NA-033. Send QSLs to LU1FM.

    Harald DF2WO is in Rwanda through the end of November operating with the callsign 9X2AW. Listen for him on CW, SSB and RTTY. QSL Manager is M0OXO.

    Georg DK7LX is in Bermuda through the 21st of November, operating holiday-style as VP9/DK7LX. You can listen for him on 40 through 15
    meters operating CW only. QSL via Club Log OQRS.

    (IRTS)


    **
    KICKER: THE SCIENCE OF HONORING SUPPORTER'S MEMORY

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We close this week with a tale of weather balloons released
    in an Indiana football field -- two balloons with two missions. Don
    Wilbanks AE5DW shares that story.

    DON: In the eyes of 20 high school seniors from Indiana's Hobart High
    School, few things could have flown higher in those few moments of
    launch than Gensis and Exodus, the weather balloons that lifted off on
    Nov. 9 from the school's football field.

    The engineering and design seniors were led by teacher Brent Vermeulen,
    who had secured about $3,000 in grants to make the launch happen. Each helium-filled balloon had a GoPro camera and a 360 degree HD camera to
    record its flight, plus an antenna enabling tracking by two local hams.

    Exodus lived up to its name, traveling 240 miles before ending up in a cornfield near Huron, Ohio. Genesis made it as far as Napoleon, Ohio, completing a trip of about 162 miles before landing in a farmer's field
    there.

    Much more was on board however than just recording and radio equipment.
    Jackie Fitzgerald of Hobart had been on the sidelines watching it all.
    This year her brother, Marvin Boetcher, WV90, could not be there for one
    of his favorite annual events. The Hobart amateur, a 1967 graduate of
    the school, became a Silent Key in March.

    Jackie had made a donation in her brother's memory to help the flight --
    and these words covered the payload of Genesis: "in loving memory of
    Marvin Boetcher."

    She watched the students and their balloons and in her eyes too, few
    things could have flown higher on that bright morning.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    (CHICAGO TRIBUNE)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; the Chicago Tribune;
    the CQ Magazine; the CW Operators Club; Hap Holly and the Rain Report;
    Irish Radio Transmitters Society; Law 360; the Massachusetts Institute
    of Technology; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the U.S. Court of Appeals; Worldwide Flora and Fauna; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, November 24, 2017 13:37:30
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2091 for Friday, November 24, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2091 with a release date of Friday, November 24, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The FCC commits to streamlining its approvals
    for wireless advances. Youngsters On the Air operators prepare for
    worldwide contacts -- and the youngest competitor in 2018's World
    Radiosport Team Championship shares holiday inspiration. All this and
    more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2091 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    FCC CHAIRMAN COMMITS TO FEWER DELAYS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with good news for impatient innovators in the world of wireless. FCC chairman Ajit Pai has pledged
    to change the FCC's longstanding reputation for long delays in approving
    new technology, especially in the field of wireless.

    Approval often takes years, but in a speech he gave Nov. 17 in New York,
    the chairman said decisions for such approvals would now be made within
    a year.

    Pai said that his priority for the past 10 months at the FCC has been to review regulations so they reflect the market, even if that means
    streamlining or even eliminating some rules. He said the purpose of the
    move is to get government out of the way of private enterprise and
    innovation.

    He said [QUOTE] "one of the most powerful forces in government is
    inertia. To ensure that innovators don’t get sandbagged, we’re
    implementing a new process. If someone seeks approval of a new
    technology or service that falls within our jurisdiction, we’ll make a decision within one year." [ENDQUOTE]

    In other words, there will be less waiting for everyone - or so we hope.

    (FCC, SOUTHGATE)

    **

    ONE MORE LOOK BACK AT JAMBOREE ON THE AIR

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our radio scouting report this week includes a top
    performing station during Jamboree on the Air. Here's more from Bill
    Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL: This week in radio scouting we have one activation of the K2BSA callsign, one activation from Scout Camps on the Air and congratulations
    to the team at K4V.

    Timothy Shoemaker AK4ZZ will be activating K2BSA/4 at the Central
    Florida Council Scouting Jamboree from Osceola Heritage Park in
    Kissimmee, FL, on from December 1st through the 3rd. This event is
    described as an event like no other! Live Bands Friday and Saturday
    night, awesome interactive and hands-on program all day Saturday,
    Inflatables, demonstrations, career encounters, and much more! It can
    only get better with an amateur radio demonstration station.

    Charles McBride and the rest of the group from the BSA Troop 20 Amateur
    Radio Club WS5BSA are at it once again from Camp George Thomas in
    Boone, OK on December 9th. They'll start the morning on 40m and work
    their way up the bands as propagation changes through the day. They'll
    also be on VHF/UHF on the WX5LAW and KB5LLI repeaters and on EchoLink
    via N4RDB repeater connected to the *JOTA-365* node. Look for this
    active group on the bands.

    Jamboree on the Air Reports hit the closing date for the compilation of
    the annual report. Initial numbers are showing a decrease in
    participation although the traffic on the bands didn't quite feel like
    it. As well, Icom America's ID-51A Plus handheld was awarded to the K4V group. K4V was on the air from Louisville, TN and the Great Smoky
    Mountain Council. They've shared a few photos of their operation along
    with a delightful video that captures the excitement of getting on the
    air during JOTA. You can find links to the video and images on our
    website. Congratulations to George Shields and Stephen Carpenter of K4V
    for conducting a great Jamboree on the Air operation and in winning the
    HT for filing their station report.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD


    **

    NEIL and BRYANT CARDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A 13-year old ham radio operator has come up with a
    creative approach to his next big challenge, as we hear from Neil Rapp
    WB9VPG.

    NEIL: The World Radiosport Team Championship is coming up soon, and one
    newly upgraded to Extra class ham is excited about the opportunity to
    compete. Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO tells us about the trip.

    BRYANT: So WRTC is the World Radio Team Championship. It is held every
    four years. It’s where two-person teams compete for 24 hours all in one location. It’s a level playing field, because all the stations and competitors have the same terrain, region, power level and antenna
    setup. Next year, WRTC will be held in Wittenberg, Germany. I was chosen
    to compete in one of the three youth teams. I am the youngest competitor
    and the only youth from North America.

    NEIL: It’s not easy to afford to get there especially when you’re 13
    years old. So he came up with a creative solution.

    BRYANT: In order to help cover some of the travel and equipment costs I
    have created some Christmas themed ham radio postcards that can be used
    as a Christmas QSL card or a personal greeting card. If you are
    interested in purchasing any of these fun postcards, please look me up
    on QRZ.com for more information.

    NEIL: The cards combine some holiday cheer with ham radio. For example,
    a reindeer with some yagis and a Buddipole for antlers! And a barn with
    a manger complete with a tower on top of the barn. For all the info
    check out KG5HVO on QRZ.com.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG

    **

    DO DROP IN SANTA ON CHRISTMAS EVE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In keeping with the holiday spirit of Bryant's cards, we
    also bring you this report from.....well........I guess from Santa. Are
    you there Mr. Claus?

    SANTA: HO HO HO, well boys and girls, it's my favorite time of the year
    again - it's time for the Santa Watch Net!

    DON: That's right, Santa will be making his rounds and once again for
    the seventh year in a row the gang at the Do Drop In will be watching
    the radar. Join the Santa Watch Net starting at 1800 hours Eastern Time

    SANTA: HO HO HO, and my little elf Dave N3NTV ... ooooooh he is such a
    cute little fellow! (I think he may have put on some weight.) He's going
    to be calling the net and keeping track of old Santa's location.....er, QTH........

    DON: And just like last year, Santa has a radio in his sleigh and yeah,
    he'll chat with the kids again.

    SANTA: Oh that's right. Bring all the little ones and let's get them
    checked in. HO HO HO third party traffic is always on the 'nice' list.

    DON: Once again it's the Santa Watch Net, Christmas Eve, 1800 hours
    Eastern on the Do Drop In EchoLink Conference Server Node Number 355800.

    SANTA: HO HO HO Merry Christmas from me, old Santa and all my little
    elves here at the Do Drop In, HO HO HO.


    (DAVID VOWELL N3NTV)


    **

    YOUNGSTERS ON THE AIR PREPARES FOR DECEMBER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The arrival of December means a lot of things to people -
    but if you're a young ham radio operator it means "get ready for
    action," as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: While most youngsters may anticipate December because it brings Christmas and a break from school, young amateur radio operators in IARU region 1 know what it means for them: The annual Youngsters on the Air
    or YOTA activity takes place where youngsters work the bands to make as
    many contacts around the world as they can with one another.
    Most countries have special YOTA stations. You'll know them when you
    hear them - their call signs will have Y-O-T-A as their suffix. You
    don't need to be in your 20s, or even younger, to make a contact. It
    might even make some OMs feel young again.

    Registered special calls already include South Africa ZS9YOTA, Russia
    R17YOTA, Sweden SH9YOTA and Slovakia OM9YOTA. If you're a young Ham and
    not yet registered, there is still time to get on the list - at least
    until December. Visit ham hyphen yota dot com (ham-yota.com) to register
    your call sign on-line.

    While it's not considered a contest there are definitely prizes - new
    friends, a new experience and a sense of accomplishment among them.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (YOUNGSTERS ON THE AIR)

    **

    D-STAR RADIO WITHOUT THE RADIO? SURE!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Kentucky, one amateur radio operator has created an opportunity for others to try D-STAR. This report by Jack Prindle AB4WS
    comes to us courtesy of Amateur News Weekly.

    JACK PRINDLE'S REPORT: There are probably some of you out there who have
    heard about all the interesting things happening on the Kentucky D-STAR
    system and are interested in listening to the reflector 56 Bravo but you
    don't have a D-STAR radio. Now there is a way to monitor D-STAR
    Reflector 056 Bravo thanks to Ray KI4BM, the owner of Kentucky D-STAR Reflector 56. There's now a Broadcastify feed set up with the feed
    number 26910 or just go to broadcastify dot com and browse the feeds for Kentucky and Boyle County and you'll see the Reflector 56B feed. It is
    also available on Android and IOS apps which carry Broadcastify feeds.
    This will also help you listen to the Kentucky D-STAR Reflector 56 Bravo
    Net which is held every Thursday evening at 7 p.m. Eastern Time. You can
    also get the latest information on the Kentucky D-STAR scene via
    Facebook. Barry K4MNF created and administers the Kentucky D-STAR
    Facebook group. Send a friend request to join the group today. Covering
    the Amateur Radio News in the Greater Cincinnati Area and the
    Commonwealth of Kentucky for Amateur News Weeklly this is Jack Prindle
    AB4WS in Big Bone Kentucky.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For more news in the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana, visit amateur
    news weekly dot com.

    (AMATEUR NEWS WEEKLY)

    **
    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including the
    Muncie Area Amateur Radio Club's WB9HXG repeater in Muncie, Indiana
    during the weekly net on Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

    **

    IN SWAZILAND, PROMISE THEM THE MOON

    PAUL/ANCHOR: There's big excitement in one African nation where a team
    of radio operators has been aiming at the moon. We learn more from Jim
    Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM MEACHEN: Now this is a big first for Swaziland. A group of amateurs operating in this southern African nation has conducted its first
    successful EME, or Earth-Moon-Earth communications.

    In early November, a temporary station set up in a rural area by John
    Sygo ZS6JON, Chris Ploeger and Lins Berben PA3CMC operated as Z21EME,
    managing contacts with about 500 stations in 50 different countries over
    the course of four days. Some of the hams who ended up in their log were
    in the U.S. and New Zealand. They bounced their signals off a moon approximately 350,000 kilomaters, or more than 217 thousand miles, from
    earth - a signal that did not return to earth until nearly 3 seconds
    later. According to their QRZ page, their operations were on 2m, 6m,
    70cm and 23cm.

    The hams told the Times of Swaziland this was the first successful EME operation from that nation. They had promised their contacts the moon -
    and the moon delivered.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.


    (THE TIMES OF SWAZILAND, QRZ)

    **

    YASMA FOUNDATION HONORS HAMS AT GENEVA CEREMONY

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A number of hams received high honors from the Yasme
    Foundation recently for their service to amateur radio. Stephen Kinford
    N8WB tells us who won what.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The former president of the International Amateur
    Radio Club 4U1ITU was honored with the Diamond Award of the
    International Amateur Radio Union during a ceremony in Geneva,
    Switzerland on November 9th. Attila Matas, HB9IAJ, was selected for the
    award based on his years of support for amateur radio and amateur
    satellite radio.

    The Yasme Foundation has presented a number of its Excellence Awards to
    hams for their service. Dale Hughes VK1DSH received the honor in
    appreciation for his work at the World Radiocommunication Conference in November of 2015. Nathaniel Frissell W2NAF and Magda Moses KM4EGE were
    honored for creating the Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation - or
    HAMSCI - the group that sponsored the Solar Eclipse QSO Party. The
    Dayton Amateur Radio Association received an award for organizing
    Hamvention. Paul Verhage KD4STH and Bill Brown WB8ELK were given an
    award for their leadership and continued technical innovation in Amateur
    Radio high-altitude ballooning -- and the WSJT Development Team was
    honored by Yasme for producing digital weak-signal mode software. The
    awards have been given since 2008 by the nonprofit foundation.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB

    (WIA, ARRL)

    **
    CANADIAN RADIO OPERATOR'S A HALL-OF-FAMER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another high honor went recently to an amateur in the
    Canadian province of Alberta. He's now in the hall of fame, as we hear
    from Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    GERI: Roland Peddle VE6RL of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada has been
    appointed to the Canadian Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. According to the
    Hall of Fame's bio of Roland, what began as a shortwave-listening hobby
    as a child led to early licensing in 1952 as VO1D. That call was later
    changed to VO1BD. The retired high school science teacher had been
    president of the amateur radio club in his native Newfoundland and
    editor of its newsletter. He was also emergency coordinator of the
    Amateur Radio Emergency Corps, editor of the Society of Newfoundland
    Radio Amateurs newsletter and became assistant Atlantic director for the
    CRRL and Radio Amateurs of Canada when it was formed in 1993.

    Following numerous awards, he was named an honorary life member of the
    Society of Newfoundland Radio Amateurs in 1996.

    Roland has book coming out in 2018: "Marconi to the Mobile Age: A
    History of Amateur Radio in Newfoundland and Labrador."

    His formal induction will take place shortly.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **
    RADIO CLUB OF AMERICA TAPS NEW LEADERSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The new year will bring new board members and officers to
    the Radio Club of America. All will serve two-year terms beginning the
    1st of January. A number of these new leaders are amateur radio
    operators. The new officers are Barney Scholl, K3LA, to be vice
    president and counsel; Margaret Lyons, Secretary, and Ron Jakubowski,
    K2RJ, Treasurer.New Directors are Ernie Blair, WA4BPS; Karen Clark;
    Michael Clarson, WV2ZOW; Paul Gilbert, KE5ZW; Ray Novak, N9JA; Carole
    Perry, WB2MGP, and Elaine Walsh.

    Congratulations to everyone.

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the World of DX, a group of Argentinian radio operators will be on
    the air as HC8LUT from San Cristobal Island in the Galapagos Islands
    from the 29th of November until the 8th of December. Listen for them on
    160 through 10 meters where they will be using mainly SSB and the
    digital modes. They will also operate on the low earth orbit satellites
    on SSB and FM. Send QSLs via IK2DUW.

    Listen for Obaid/A61M operating as 5T1R and Fawaz/A92AA operating as
    5T1A from Mauritania through the 20th of December. Hear them on 40-10
    meters using SSB and FT8. QSL both callsigns via A92AA. They will be
    joined by Ahmad/9K2AI for an IOTA activation to Tidra Island as 5T5TI
    between the 1st and 7th of December. For the Tidra Island activation
    send QSLs via NI5DX, LoTW or ClubLog.

    Olof, G0CKV, will be on the air through the 11th of December from
    Rodriguez Island operating as 3B9HA. Olof will be working holiday style focusing on the low bands and CW. Send QSLs via M0OXO or LoTW.

    **
    KICKER: BIRTH (AND LAUNCH) OF A NATION

    PAUL/ANCHOR: If you've ever wondered what it takes to launch a new
    nation, look to the launchpad itself. Here's Skeeter Nash N5ASH with our
    final story of the week, about a most unusual new nation.

    SKEETER'S REPORT: It's the size of a loaf of bread or perhaps a milk
    carton but in actuality, it's much more than than that.

    On Nov. 12 the Asgardia-1 nanosatellite seceded not from any nation or
    any continent but from Planet Earth itself. The satellite is a nation
    unto itself, a "space kingdom" with a population of 115,000 individuals
    from 200 nations here on Earth who have been given status as citizens.
    That gives them the privilege to upload their personal data onto the
    cubesat for safekeeping in space. So far 0.5 TB of data are on board --
    family photographs and memorabilia along with the space nation's own
    flag, national symbols and constitution.

    The emerging nation of Asgardia was lifted through the atmosphere on
    Nov. 14 aboard a NASA commercial cargo vehicle to dock with the
    International Space Station for a one-month stay. In about three weeks,
    it will launch even higher into orbit.

    The space nation is the creation of billionaire Russian scientist Igor Ashurbeyli who modeled it to be what he calls a peaceful society making
    use of technology. It bears the name of a city in Norse mythology that
    resided in the skies - at a time before uploading of anything was ever invented.

    One of Ashurbeyli's next plans is to convince the UN to recognize
    Asgardia as a sovereign nation -- but for now its citizens - still at
    home here on Earth - will have to be content with the independence it
    won on the launchpad.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.

    (SOUTHGATE, CNN)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    CQ Magazine; CNN; David Vowell N3NTV; the FCC; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; Irish Radio Transmitters Society; K2BSA; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin;
    QRZ; Radio Club of America; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Times of Swaziland; Wireless Institute of Australia;
    WTWW Shortwave; Youngsters on the Air; and you our listeners, that's all
    from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, December 01, 2017 10:17:50
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2092 for Friday, December 1st, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2092 with a release date of Friday, December 1st, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. SKYWARN Recognition Day celebrates amateur
    response to weather. NASA prepares for a year of marking milestones --
    and here come those Santa Nets! All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2092 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    SKYWARN RECOGNITION DAY WEATHERS THE STORMS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: As we reach the end of a particularly challenging
    hurricane season in the U.S., SKYWARN Recognition Day on December 2nd
    takes on particular significance. The event shows just how valuable hams
    are to The National Weather service. Here's broadcast meteorologist
    Bobby Best WX4ALA with that story.

    BOBBY'S REPORT: Many people, in both the general public and more than
    you might expect in the amateur radio community, do not realize just how valuable NWS Trained SKYWARN Spotters, especially those that are amateur
    radio operators are to the warning process at local National Weather
    Service Offices' level. Recently I spoke with Clay Barnes, a former
    amateur radio operator who allowed his license to expire. He has learned
    just how valuable both NWS-trained SKYWARN spotters are in the field to
    the National Weather Service. He especially saw this, sadly for the
    first time first hand six years ago, when a powerful EF-4 tornado
    tracked literally miles from his own home, North of Birmingham, Alabama.

    Clay, tell us, how do you see the need for more NWS/SKYWARN trained eyes
    in the field and specifically what made you choose to go back to
    scratch, getting your expired ham radio license back please.

    CLAY: Honestly, the total devastation that Alabama took during the generational tornado outbreak, on April 27th, 2011 and how we saw
    first-hand how that not only had power outages across the state but also
    the severe devastation also knocked out emergency repeaters for law enforcement, fire/rescue and EMS, just to name a few, and the quickest
    of restoring communications was through emergency agencies cooperating
    with members of amateur radio.

    There's no doubt in my mind that were it not for ham radio that day,
    Alabama would have seen more deaths. It was safer after that day. That's
    when I began to re-consider re-taking the test and getting my ham
    license back so that I could be of emergency communications assistance
    to friends, family, and neighbors.

    BOBBY: If you're a ham operator who has let your license expire, or a
    non-ham who is interested in how you can be of great support to your
    community during times of crisis, like during weather outbreaks, that
    fall under The SKYWARN umbrella of amateur radio operations, contact a
    ham radio club near you today.

    Reporting from Gardendale, Alabama for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bobby
    Best; WX4ALA.

    **

    SANTA NET ARRIVES ON 80 METERS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Our favorite ham radio stories this time of year are
    about the magic of Santa Nets. Our first story comes from Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE.

    KEVIN: As any kid will tell you, the best kind of Santa is one who
    doesn't make you wait until December 25th, right? Well we've got one
    Santa who is already here: The nightly Santa Net went on the air on
    Friday the 24th of November and will be available every night at 7:30
    p.m. Central Time through Christmas Eve. The tradition is into its 12th
    year and is operated by the 3916 Nets, the Rag Chew Crew, the Tailgaters
    and the Freewheelers. Pre-net check-ins begin nightly at 7:15 p.m.
    Central Time and are also accepted on the Santa Net's Facebook page.
    Find Santa each night on 3.916 MHz. No milk and cookies needed - but
    don't be on the naughty list: please observe all FCC rules regarding
    third party traffic.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, in Aiken, South Carolina, I'm Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE.

    **

    IN COLORADO, A NEW SANTA IN TOWN

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Looks like there's also a new Santa in town, as we hear
    from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: Like department store Santas and even sidewalk Santas, amateur
    radio Santas will soon be out there. These much-loved seasonal
    celebrities bring extra magic to an already enchanted medium. One of the newest Special Event Santas N-ZERO-P comes to us from the Park County
    Radio Club in Colorado. This Santa is giving the gift of radio -- and
    like the terrestrial Santa, this radio Santa seems to be everywhere.

    DAN: We can do it through EchoLink, we have AllStar available. For our
    locals we have VHF and UHF frequencies available as well as HF and the
    DMR Channel on TalkGroup 3100 USA.

    CARYN: That was Dan Kern W-ZERO-DFU who said club volunteers will be
    suiting up as the bearded superstar and his wife starting December 10th.
    They will be taking calls on 20 and 40 meters as well as digital modes
    such as PSK-31 and Mrs. Claus will be reachable through DMR. Best of
    all, even kids who are in hospitals or are hearing-impaired can talk to
    Santa on the radio too.

    DAN: So we are also offering the ability to communicate via text and
    email but it wouldn't be our standard format using the computer. We
    would be sending those texts and emails through our radio via APRS. We
    thought with the hearing impaired it would be a neat way for them to understand they were on ham radio - and that might also promote ham
    radio, where they might not be aware they can go digital with packet or
    PSK-31 and still be on ham radio.

    CARYN: This club is spreading good will and good cheer along with the
    good word about amateur radio - that it's a holiday gift that's
    accessible to everyone and can be enjoyed all year round, not just in a ragchew with Santa. For times, frequencies and other operating details
    through Christmas Eve, visit N-ZERO-P's page on QRZ.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT

    **
    NETS OF NOTE: SOUTHCARS IS A NET ON THE MOVE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Our occasional series, Nets of Note, returns this week
    with a look at a group of amateurs who are less about ragchewing and
    more about mobile stations on the move. Here's Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

    NEIL: This week, we feature a long standing net on 7.251. SOUTHCARS is
    one net of a family of nets that is intended for mobile stations. I had
    a chance to talk to the Net Manager Rick Hatalski ND4Z about the focus
    of the net.

    RICK: We work on a list of check-ins which a lot of people aren’t
    familiar with. We take the suffix only of the call and establish a list
    and go down one at a time. Mobiles always have priority. We kind of
    cater to mobiles and QRP stations because mobiles generally are in a predicament. They on the way to work, they get there, they go into
    tunnels so I think they should have priority. On all the CARS nets
    mobiles have priority.

    NEIL: The net has been on the air for 51 years, and has changed to
    accommodate more people.

    RICK: We find ourselves to be a very busy net. We try to not ragchew a
    lot because we have a real lot of customers. We used to be more of a
    ragchew. We had more time to talk. But with the traffic we have, we try
    to cut it short and please everybody. And we really really have a lot of check-ins, probably more than most nets.

    NEIL: Aside from mobiles and the occasional emergency, the net has also
    been a gathering place.

    RICK: Well I think we’re a little unique in the fact that we really
    dwell on helping out people, especially shut-ins. We tend to be an older
    net, kind of an old codger net. We really like young people. We know
    that young people are crucial. So we’d really like to have more young
    people. But the nature of our net is we have a lot of shut-ins and
    handicapped people who check in with us. Some of them check in all five sessions every day, seven days a week. So, we really take pride on
    trying to make people who are shut-ins and handicapped have a place to
    go on amateur radio where everybody’s friendly. We’re more of a friendly net, trying to help other amateur radio operators. That’s kind of our goal.

    NEIL: And SOUTHCARS even knows how to party!

    RICK: We have luncheons and get-togethers. We generally have things like
    the Golden Corral and restaurants like that where we have a free
    tailgate for people to buy, sell and trade ham gear. Then we usually go
    into the restaurants and have a nice meal. We do this several times a
    year. We have a picnic in the mountains of North Georgia once a year. So
    we have a lot of fun. We have a lot of good fellowship on SOUTHCARS.

    NEIL: You can find SOUTHCARS on 7.251 and online at southcars.com. With
    this week’s “Net of Note” I’m Neil Rapp, WB9VPG reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline.

    **
    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    North Coast Amateur Radio Club's K8SCI repeater in Brunswick, Ohio on
    Sundays at 9 p.m. during the weekly info net.

    **

    NEW ARISS COMMITTEE DOES ITS HOMEWORK

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: So who's staying after school these days? The U.S.
    Education Committee of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station.
    But they're not in detention. Jim Damron N8TMW explains.

    JIM: The International Space Station is many things but to educators and
    ham radio operators it's first and foremost a learning tool. Now the
    program has added the power of teachers from the elementary through
    college level around the country to advise ARISS and one another of new
    ways to inspire kids: about space, about technology and yes, about
    radio. They're part of a new committee, says ARISS secretary Rosalie
    White K1STO.

    ROSALIE: "Ham radio is front and center because we want these teachers
    who have experienced using amateur radio in the classroom from maybe
    just now and then to almost every week to be able to say, 'well this
    program worked for me this year - two years ago I had a problem with
    this program.' So to me amateur radio is front and center. STEM is very important and you can't go into a school and say 'I want to do amateur
    radio' but I've always pictured the ARISS program as a friendly
    high-tech way to get kids inspired toward amateur radio and science both....It's a win-win for everyone."

    JIM: Rosalie said the committee lets teachers do what they do best -
    teach! - while tying in parts of their existing curriculum to the space program and firing up students' imaginations.

    ROSALIE: Who better than educators to tell ARISS what can interest K
    through 12 students and even through college -- to interest them in
    amateur radio and science, technology, engineering and math -- and
    what's better than talking to an astronaut via amateur radio to inspire
    K through 12 and even college students? So that's why [we have] the
    committee, we want educators to tell us what's on their mind, what they
    think would work in the classroom and what they think the kids are
    interested in.

    JIM: The program has already facilitated more than 1,130 amateur radio contacts between students and astronauts. With the addition of this
    committee, the program hopes to connect these same students to a bright
    future too. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    **
    NASA KICKS OFF YEAR-LONG CELEBRATION OF MILESTONES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The U.S. space agency has big plans to celebrate its milestones via ham radio. Here's Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: On Monday the 11th of December, NASA has scheduled a launch for an adventure that's going to take the better part of a year to complete.
    This event involves radios, not rockets. NASA On the Air, or NOTA, is
    the year-long celebration of a variety of NASA milestones. Special event stations operated by ham radio clubs located at different NASA centers
    will be on the air marking such milestones as the agency's 60th
    anniversary, the 50-year anniversary of the first manned orbit around
    the moon and the two decades since the International Space Station's
    first elements entered low-Earth orbit.

    Even though most of the events happen next year, mark your December
    calendars now: NOTA kicks off on the 11th of December, the 45th
    anniversary of the day Apollo 17 touched down on the lunar surface. It
    was the last of the agency's manned moon landings.

    Successful contacts for all events will be sent commemorative QSL cards.
    Hams can also expect to receive special certificates noting each NASA
    club station contacted - as well as where and in what mode. There will
    be a scoring system with points awarded for each band and mode, whether
    it is phone, digital or CW or even satellite or meteor scatter. It goes without saying that contacts with Amateur Radio aboard the International
    Space Station definitely count!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (NASA)

    **

    AMATEUR RADIO GROUPS SHINE SPOTLIGHT ON DISABLED

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Disabled amateurs around the world are in the spotlight
    again, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY's REPORT: With the United Nations declaring Sunday the third of December to be the International Day of Persons with Disabilities,
    amateur radio groups in IARU Region 1 will be making a special effort
    again this year to showcase what radio can do for the disabled.

    Hams in Switzerland, Tanzania and Norway have signed on to be on the air
    as have hams in Bosnia & Herzegovina. Club station E71AVW plans to give special opportunities to members of the local club in Bosnia &
    Herzegovina who are blind and disabled. A commemorative QSL card will be
    sent to hams who establish contact on the day.

    Amateurs in Russia, who have been steady participants in the annual
    event, planned to operate from two QTHs - from the club Radio Ana RA5R
    an association of young disabled amateurs Apparel and from the Tambov
    QTH of Vladimir Gerasimov RA3RDT. The amateurs are devoting several days
    to the operation and are using the call sign R17IPHA from the first to
    the fifth of December.

    The annual recognition day is set aside to recognize the rights and
    strengths of individuals around the world who are disabled. It was
    created in 1992 by the UN's General Assembly.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (IARU REGION 1)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    Members of the "The Holy land DX Group" will be operating a special
    event station from The Shivta National Park in Israel from Friday
    December 22nd through noontime on December 24th. They will be using the callsign 4X0XMAS and hams can listen for them on SSB and using CW on the
    WWFF frequencies. This will be the first time for an operation from this
    QTH. During the Christianity On the Air event, December 22nd through
    24th, the station will also participate for the HOCOTA Award. Send QSLs
    via LoTW and eQSL. The park is considered a World Heritage Site by the
    UNESCO World Heritage Committee.

    Be listening for Fawaz, A92AA operating as 5T1A from Mauritius until
    December 20th. Listen for him on all bands using SSB and FT8. He plans a
    short break to join the 5T5TI DXpedition team between December first and seventh. Send QSLs via A92AA.

    A team of operators, including Massimo/HP1MAC, Ricardo/HP1RIS and Gianni/HP1YLS will be active between January 6th and 9th as H91IT from
    Taboga Island. Listen for them on 40-10 meters using CW and SSB. Send
    QSLs via HP1RCP.

    (OHIO PENN DX NEWSLETTER)

    **

    KICKER: SANTA PLAYS THE FOX IN AUSTRALIA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Our final story is about Santa Claus again. But wait -
    this is in Australia, where the search for Santa is getting a bit of an amateur radio twist, as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: When it comes to amateur radio direction-finding at this
    time of the year, even Santa can be pretty foxy about it. Perhaps it's
    because Santa *is* the fox during this exercise which is happening on
    the 15th of December. It's the annual Townsville Amateur Radio Club
    Monster Christmas Lights Tour when mobile shacks make their way along a
    route to a secret destination, all the while monitoring 2 meters to
    receive instructions from Santa. Yes, Santa's calling the shots as all
    the hams take their festive trip around the illuminated City of
    Townsville, Australia. Where is Santa headed? Ah, that's the secret
    --but by 10 p.m. all will be revealed. The organizer, Gavin VK4ZZ, is no humbug. He'll make sure everyone gets an eyeful as well as an earful. Handhelds will be provided on loan if hams don't have one available. Do
    bring your own water however. Sleighbells are not expected to be ringing
    in the summer heat.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams, VK4JJW.

    (TOWNSVILLE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the IARU; NASA; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; Radio Amateurs of Canada; SOUTHCARS; Southgate Amateur Radio
    News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the 3916 Nets; Townsville Amateur
    Radio Club; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, December 08, 2017 10:01:26
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2093 for Friday, December 8, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2093 with a release date of Friday, December 8, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The radio journey of Canada's Polar Prince isn't
    over just yet. Hams in India assist in tracking criminals -- and the new operating mode FT8 makes its debut at a party. All this and more as
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2093 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    HOMEWARD BOUND AND STILL ON THE AIR

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: We open this week's report with an update on the
    Canada C3 Expedition Vessel, the Polar Prince. It has completed its
    historic journey via the Northwest Passage - but its radio adventure is
    far from over, as we hear from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM MEACHEN'S REPORT: The Polar Prince is heading home to Canada's East
    Coast. The Canada C3 Expedition Vessel completed its 150-day journey to British Columbia via the Northwest Passage on Oct. 28, transmitting as
    CG3EXP. That call sign has since been retired but the ship will continue
    with its Ultimate 3 WSPR beacon, identifying as VE0EXP now as it
    ventures east through the Panama Canal. Listeners with an HF receiver
    and the WSPR application can hear its signal and track its path on WSPRnet.

    The expedition credits Michael VE7XMC a graduate student from the
    University of Victoria with helping implement that changeover. Hams are especially encouraged to continue tracking the vessel.

    The expedition from Toronto to Victoria, with visits to 75 communities
    in between, marked Canada's 150th birthday.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (WSPRNET.ORG, RADIO AMATEURS OF CANADA)

    **

    IN INDIA, HAM RADIO TEAMS UP WITH LOCAL POLICE

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: In one community in India, the real power of ham radio
    isn't necessarily measured in watts, as John Williams VK4JJW tells us.

    JOHN: Ham radio operators in Pune, India are teaming up with local law enforcement officials to harness the power of modern communications to
    help locate criminals.

    With the assistance of the local amateurs, the wireless department of
    the Maharashtra Police is hoping to develop a mobile locator to track
    cell phones that are being rendered otherwise untrackable. The new
    initiative was announced December 2nd by Abdur Rahman, deputy inspector general of police at a local ham radio club event.

    Ham radio club advisor Vilas Rabde VU2VPR said that an innovation hub is
    being developed by the police department's wireless division and the
    technical knowledge of the hams will prove invaluable here. He said
    that, at present, criminals are able to stay several steps ahead of authorities because they cannot be tracked by their mobile phones. The individuals being sought often change the phones' SIM cards and phone
    numbers too rapidly, he said.

    The hams, however, are making progress. Deputy inspector Rehman said the initiative is expected to go live very soon.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (TIMES OF INDIA)


    **

    AMATEUR RADIO HELPS WITH BOAT RESCUE AFTER CYCLONE


    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Meanwhile in southern India, hams were out in force
    after a deadly cyclone swept through two coastal states. We hear more
    from Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    JASON: When Cyclone Ockhi hit the Indian state of Kerala on the 30th of November, a ham radio network based at Cheruthoni stepped in to help
    locate and ensure the safety of boats stranded in the waters off the
    southern coastal region. According to Manoj Galaxy VU2DTH, initial communication attempts via simplex did not get very far and were
    frequently disrupted until the hams were able to connect with a repeater station at Calvarymount - a station that is 5,000 feet above sea level.

    Finally confident in its connections, the hams were able to make use of
    the repeater to listen for any signs of distress calls. The station was
    also able to relay information to the Coast Guard and other rescue
    entities.

    Between wireless and GPS, the operation was a success. Stranded fishing
    boats were soon spotted and rescuers could then step in.

    According to some news reports, the cyclone's deadly force in parts of
    Kerala and Tamil Nadu killed at least 12 before heading off to the islands.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    (THE HINDU)

    **

    SILENT KEY: FRANCE'S JEAN TOUZOT F8IL

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The French amateur radio community is marking the loss
    of one of the world's oldest hams, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED's REPORT: While there are no official records tracking who is the
    world's oldest amateur radio operator, clearly it could have been Jean
    Touzot F8IL of Albi, France, who at 109 years of age, had only been off
    the air for four years. At 105 the retired industrial designer was still operating on CW with a mix of the old and the new: His transceiver was
    a modern Yaesu rig and his key was the old-fashioned kind. A native of Algeria, Jean has died in France. He had been a member of France's
    amateur radio society, the REF, and the Union of French Telegraphists.
    Widely known for his proficiency in CW, he received the gift of a custom
    Morse Key on the occasion of his 100th birthday. He had learned CW while
    in the military over the course of two months --and it was enough to
    last a lifetime for the man known as the "dean of French radio amateurs."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (SOUTHGATE)


    **

    RADIO CAROLINE COMES ASHORE WITH A LICENSE

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Pirate radio fans, listen up: Radio Caroline is now
    licensed and on shore, as Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us.

    JEREMY: It's almost as if the old Ross Revenge pirate ship has come
    ashore - except this time things are different. Radio Caroline hasn't
    just come ashore from its pirate ship, it's now legally riding waves of
    a different kind: radio waves. Licensed now by Ofcom, the former world-renowned former pirate radio station reports it's been getting
    great reception with its 1 kilowatt ERP operation on 648 kHz. That
    frequency was at one time allocated to the BBC for its world service broadcasts, mostly in English. It was granted earlier this year to Radio Caroline.

    Transmissions can either originate from studios on land or on the
    restored Ross Revenge ship moored in the River Blackwater where those interested can even take a trip out to visit the ship for just 25 pounds
    - full details on the radiocaroline DOT co DOT uk website.

    The medium wave frequency seems to suit it well. By its own reports,
    it's been heard in Italy and Finland and even Japan. Signal quality has
    also been encouraging, the operators say. They are even being inundated
    with offers to send mp3 recordings of their transmissions - an offer
    they are, for now, politely declining. Reception reports, however, can
    be submitted on their website radiocaroline dot co dot uk (radiocaroline.co.uk)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (RADIO CAROLINE)

    **

    AN ON-AIR PARTY ROCKS WITH NEW MODE FT8

    CHRISTIAN: Get ready to party. The weekend of December 16th and 17th is
    set aside for the European Radio Amateurs' Organization event on the air
    which - this year - features operations on FT8, one of ham radio's
    newest modes.

    Make your contacts, exchange your callsign, locator and give your signal report but remember, it's not a contest - it's more like a radio
    meet-up. There will be a certificate of participation for amateurs who
    send their log with at least 10 percent of the QSOs confirmed. Logs are
    being kept to gather statistical data only and should be submitted in
    ADIF format to: party at eurao dot org, using your call sign as the name
    of the file. (party@eurao.org)

    FT8 mode, which was still in beta-testing mode this summer, is
    considered a good mode for HF DXing. It is often used in situations such
    as multi-hop Es where openings may be short and signals may be weak and fading. QSOs can often be made quickly.

    This is the first party of its kind being held by the group and members
    are hoping that FT8 will give hams something to celebrate.


    **

    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    W9ELK repeater in Elkhorn, Wisconsin on Mondays at 8 p.m.

    **
    NORWEGIAN CLUB CELEBRATES TELEFUNKEN TRANSMITTER

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: One ham club in Norway gave a bit of a history lesson
    to on-air listeners with the help of a very old transmitter. Jeremy Boot
    G4NJH has that story.

    JEREMY: There's no transmitter like an old transmitter and what better
    way to celebrate one that went into service 80 years ago than to get it
    back on the air. That's what a group of hams in Norway did on Sunday the
    26th of November with the Telefunken LW/MW transmitter station, an old medium-wave broadcasting station outside Bergen, Norway.

    The Bergen Amateur Radio Club LA1ASK reports that their listener
    response from that day's activation from the station site came from
    radio enthusiasts in the UK, Finland - and beyond.

    The hams were marking the transmitter's first day on the air - which was
    the 28th of November in 1937. The club's shack is inside the broadcast station which is considered a museum site and so a number of its transmissions, such as this one, are done in the interest of preserving history. As for the Telefunken 20 KW transmitter, it was finally taken
    out of service in 1978 and is apparently the only one of its kind left.

    Club station LA1ASK uses much more modern equipment: an IC7600 and an
    Acom PA. The club is active on the bands from 160 meters to 10 meters.
    There is also a connection through from Echolink. The station sometimes
    uses the call sign LA1C when it is active on behalf of the Norwegian
    Relay League.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE, QRZ)

    **

    HONORING INDIANA HAMS FOR LONGEVITY

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Here's another story of longevity -- this time, it's
    about two ham radio operators in Indiana. They're marking 60 years on
    the air. Jack Parker W8ISH brings us this report courtesy of Amateur
    News Weekly.

    JACK'S REPORT: It's always nice to be recognized for making amateur
    radio an outstanding hobby. Two Indiana hams were recognized recently by
    the Northwest DX Club for longevity. The Northwest DX Club presented two
    of their own with certificates for achieving 60 years of amateur radio participation. The awards went to Jerry Hess W9KTP and Alex Kostelnik
    K9KAN. Group president John Poindexter W3ML presented the awards.
    Reporting for Amateur News Weekly this is Jack Parker W8ISH.

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: For more news of the Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky area
    visit amateurnewsweekly dot com (amateurnewsweekly.com)


    **
    W1AW TO RETURN TO 6 METERS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: You say you haven't worked W1AW yet? Well now you have
    even more of a chance to get it in your logbook. Starting January 2nd,
    the ARRL's Maxim Memorial Station will have scheduled transmissions on 6 meters, the band where the station once operated regularly until late 1989.

    W1AW will include 50.350 MHz in its regular CW code practice and will
    also use the frequency for its digital, CW and phone bulletins. Six
    meters will also act as a beacon and hams may send their signal reports
    by email or through the web.

    (ARRL)

    **

    CANADA REVIEWS HAND-HELD RULE FOR DRIVERS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: In Canada, it's almost decision time: Officials are
    looking at handheld radio use behind the wheel. Heather Embee KB3TZD has
    the details.

    HEATHER: On January 1st, the five-year exemption permitting drivers'
    handheld use of two-way radios in Ontario, Canada is set to expire.

    Radio Amateurs of Canada has been waiting to hear from the Ontario
    Ministry of Transportation about the fate of the exemption from the
    province's Distracted Driving Law.

    RAC Directors Allan Boyd, V-E-3-A-J-B, and Phil McBride, V-A-3-Q-R, had
    met with Ontario Transportation officials earlier this year and declared
    the session productive but are still awaiting word of what will happen.

    The RAC has formed a committee to work with both Ontario and British
    Columbia, both of which have distracted-driving regulations. In British Columbia, amateurs have been permitted since February of this year to
    drive while operating radios that have push-to-talk buttons.

    According to the RAC's website, there will be a decision on the Ontario regulations prior to the 1st of January and the RAC has pledged to issue
    a bulletin as soon as there’s an update.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, K-B-3-T-Z-D.


    (RADIO AMATEURS OF CANADA)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, listen for Jacques, F6HMJ, operating as 6W7/F6HMJ
    from Senegal
    between December 21st and January 15th. He will be active using CW with
    some SSB on 20-10 meters. Send QSLs via his home callsign.

    Off the Senegal coast, a group of four operators is using the call sign
    6V1A from Goree Island between December 15th and 17th. Listen for them
    on CW and SSB on all HF bands. According to the most recent 6V1A page on
    QRZ all QSLs should be sent to: Post Office Box 971, Dakar, Senegal.

    Lester, W8YCM, is using the call sign 6Y6Y in Negril Jamaica (NA-0097)
    through January 2018. Lester is working holiday style on a number of HF
    bands. Send QSLs via W8YCM direct only.

    Rich, PA0RRS, is on Penang Island operating as 9M2MRS until January
    31st. Listen for Rich on 40-10
    meters using CW, RTTY and PSK. Send QSLs to his home callsign via
    ClubLog's OQRS, LoTW or eQSL.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE 'MIR' KIND

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: In our final story, we find ourselves once again
    welcoming ham radio as a film or TV hero. In this case, it's a film that
    is just now making its premiere in Cuba. Graham Kemp VK4BB tells us more.

    GRAHAM: It's not quite true....but it's not quite false. The story of of Sergio the Cuban amateur radio operator and Sergei the MIR Space Station cosmonaut is indeed the stuff of fiction. The movie is making its
    premiere at the International Festival of New Latin American Cinema,
    which opened in Havana Dec. 7. Its story follows the friendship of a
    Cuban amateur with an orbiting cosmonaut who is stranded in space in
    1991 as the Soviet Union crumbles during its final days.

    The 93-minute movie is directed and co-written by Ernesto Daranas, who
    told several media outlets that the film is a fictionalized account
    based on several real-life exchanges that Cuban amateurs had with Soviet
    crews at that time in history.

    Sergei is the cosmonaut stranded on the MIR. His counterpart, Sergio the
    ham, is a Marxist philosophy professor watching his own world in Cuba
    struggle with a very down-to-earth economic crisis.

    Ham radio gives rise to a growing friendship between the two men - both
    adrift in their respective universes - and it eventually widens to
    include a U.S. journalist covering NASA, played by American actor Ron
    Perlman.

    The film reflects a greater friendship, however, one not evident on
    screen: the warmer relations between the U.S. and Cuba and their
    cooperation in the production. What better way to honor the spirit of
    ham radio than to bridge two worlds here on earth?

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    (IMDB.COM, SOUTHGATE, DEADLINE HOLLYWOOD)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    CQ Magazine; Deadline Hollywood; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the
    Hindu newspaper; the IARU; IMDB.com; Ohio Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; Radio Amateurs of Canada; Radio Caroline; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the Times of India; WSPRNET.ORG; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH in St. Louis,
    Missouri saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, January 26, 2018 08:33:18
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2100 for Friday, January 26, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2100 with a release date of Friday, January 26 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams in Germany get the green light to stay on 6 meters. Kosovo becomes the newest DXCC entity -- and citizen scientists
    get an invitation to a ham radio conference in New Jersey. All this and
    more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2100 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    GERMANY KEEPS 6 METERS - AND KOSOVO'S A NEW DXCC

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with a look at some
    change and growth that continues in our hobby. In our first report, hams
    in one country get the hoped-for green light to continue using 6 meters
    -- and in our second report, the world of radio gains a whole new entity
    for DXCC. We start with this report from Ed Durrant DD5LP in Germany.

    ED'S REPORT: While some amateur bands are permanently allocated to
    amateur radio enthusiasts in Germany, others are bands where amateurs
    are "geduldet" (put up with). These authorizations are for set periods
    of time and if not renewed, amateurs can no longer use the band. One
    case in point is 6 meters and in the December 2017 issue of memos from
    BNetZa (the government regulator) the authorization for amateur use of 6 meters has been extended.

    Another change in the memos is the authorization for Class E (Novice) licensees now to be able to use the 13 and 6 centimeter bands at a
    maximum of 5 watts PEP until the end of 2018. At the other end of the
    scale, Top Band (160 meters) has had the
    permitted power that can be used between 1850 and 1890KHz in the band increased from 75 to 100 watts PEP. Contests are also now allowed on
    weekends but only in the frequency range of 1890 to 2000 KHz.

    As yet, there is no news as to whether German hams may get access to the
    4 meter band for further tests during the sporadic-E season later in the
    year - we wait in hope.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Add to that some good news for DXers. There's one more
    good reason now to call "CQ DX." A new DXCC entity has been added to the
    radio map: Inclusion of the Republic of Kosovo (Z6) raises the number of
    DXCC locations to 340. The change is effective as of the 21st of
    January. The ARRL Board of Directors made the announcement after
    approving a motion to amend the DXCC rules to include entities that have
    a separate IARU member society and are included on the U.S. State
    Department Independent States in the World list at their meeting held
    January 19th and 20th. Kosovo, formerly part of Yugoslavia, was
    admitted to the International Amateur Radio Union in 2015. The Kosovo
    Amateur Radio Association is known by the initials SHRAK.

    (ARRL)

    **
    RADIO ATHLETES GETTING FIT FOR WRTC 2018

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: This year brings big things to Jessen/Wittenberg (YESSEN/Wittenberg), Germany, as some of the world's top contesters
    converge for the contest-of-all-contests. Neil Rapp WB9VPG spoke to a
    ham and published author who has sized up the challenge ahead.

    NEIL: In our continuing coverage leading up to the World Radiosport Team Championship 2018 in July, one thing stands out. Preparing for the
    competition and being selected takes an amazing amount of effort. Jim
    George, N3BB, author of the book (and soon to be released Audible book) “Contact Sport,” shares his perspective on the competitors’ endurance
    from WRTC 2014 in Boston.

    JIM: All in all, to qualify for this contest and to do it really well is
    an amazing personal commitment. It almost takes 4 years from your life......three of the four to qualify, and then one to get ready to get
    ready and then to do it and then to recover from it. So, it’s quite an adventure.

    NEIL: There are also the challenges in the moment of the contest itself
    - and they can be formidable, from equipment not working to bands, such
    as 10 meters, opening at an inconvenient time.

    JIM: A lot of things have to go right. The gear had to work, you had to
    catch the openings, you had to stay awake, you had to have considerable personal endurance… Wow. All in all, that's the pinnacle.

    NEIL: Yes, there are some physical considerations too. Hams are, after
    all, only human.

    JIM: Believe me, to keep concentration for 24 hours with the thing
    running at, you know, 200 contacts an hour for the most part, is really
    tough for both operators. In New England, very few teams even went to
    the bathroom. This is a straight through thing. It was complicated, or assisted, by the fact that the weather was very hot. So people were
    drinking a lot, but they were sweating a lot. And, many teams didn’t go
    take a nature break whatsoever.

    NEIL: For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, in
    Bloomington, Indiana.

    **

    AIKEN TO GROW IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: In Aiken, South Carolina, things just keep getting
    better for one middle school ham club. As the FCC roster of licensees
    keeps growing, so does the club's membership, as we hear from Kevin
    Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: On January 6th and 7th, there were 4 new additions to the world
    of Radio Amateurs in Aiken, South Carolina. The Aiken Scofield Middle
    School Technology and Amateur Radio Club, N4SMS is proud to report that
    their membership now includes 4 new Tech Class license holders.

    They each received a new Baofeng UV-5R radio to announce their newly
    acquired callsigns on a weekly net on Thursday, January 18. Checking in
    were Andrew (KN4IVA), Anna (KN4IVD), Lance (KN4IWB) and Piper (KN4IWC). Thanks go to the sponsoring club, the North Augusta-Belvedere Amateur
    Radio Club (K4NAB) for doing what they've done for the past 7 years by Elmering Scofield Middle School students and providing equipment such as
    their new Baofeng HT's and other club equipment to keep their interest
    going.

    The Scofield Middle School club is no stranger to Newsline. They were
    recently mentioned by placing 1st overall in the nation in the School
    Club Roundup in all school categories from elementary to university
    level last October, and that was for the second year in a row. Our congratulations goes out to the Aiken Scofield Middle School Club and
    our thanks go to the North Augusta-Belvedere Amateur Radio Club for
    keeping Amateur Radio growing and ensuring our future will be better
    than ever.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline in Aiken, South Carolina, I'm Kevin Trotman,
    N5PRE.

    **
    HAMS TAKING ST. PATRICK'S DAY GLOBAL

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Happy St. Patrick's Day! well....OK, not yet. But hams really should be thinking about the holiday now - and Jeremy Boot G4NJH
    tells us why.

    JEREMY: St. Patrick's Day is coming to Bangalore, India with amateur
    radio station VU3YPP. It's also going to be happening in a big way in
    Italy with station IZ4OSH. You'll find GB1SPD and GB9SPD celebrating on
    the air from Northern Ireland as well as many from the "Emerald Isle."
    After all the whole idea is to bring good spirits -- even a bit of the
    Irish Blarney -- to the bands for 48 hours with station activations
    across the time zones around the globe.

    Organizers are encouraging everyone anywhere in the world to go green
    and get on the air between 12 noon UTC on the 16th of March to 12 noon
    on the 18th of March.

    There are a number of awards being given out both for mobile and fixed stations and organizers are encouraging stations to register as early as possible to become an official St. Patrick's Day station. You can do
    that by visiting the website is spelled out as S T Patrickaward dot webs
    dot com (stpatrickaward.webs.com)

    From Ireland to the rest of the world, it will be a time to wish a top-of-the-morning....from the top of the bands.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    **
    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the W6JW repeater of the Santa Clarita Amateur Radio Club in Santa Clarita,
    California on Mondays at 8 p.m.

    **

    IN SEARCH OF AFRICAN OPERATORS ON HF

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: If you are listening to this newscast from the African continent, this next report from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF is for you.

    JIM MEACHEN: It's not hard to find HF amateurs in Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Lesotho. Nor is it a challenge to tune around the HF dial
    and find Namibia, Angola, Mozambique or Zambia. What hams in South
    Africa are hoping, however, is that there are hams out there who are
    using VHF - or want to try. The South African radio league would like to
    find amateurs who want to explore single-hop or double-hop Sporadic-E communications with South Africa and learn more about how Sporadic-E
    behaves in middle Africa. SARL is also hoping there will be some
    insights too into Tropical Tropo propagation. Whether you get on the air
    using VHF or opt to put up a VHF beacon, your input and your
    participation is welcome. Interested African amateurs can email A R
    today at sarl dot org dot za (artoday@sarl.org.za) for more details.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    (SARL)

    **
    K2BSA GETS ON THE AIR AND HAS BIG PLANS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: The radio scouts of K2BSA never rest. Bill Stearns
    NE4RD tells us what they'll be up to in the week ahead.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in Radio Scouting we have one activation from
    Scout Camps on the Air, the BSA National Radio Scouting Committee
    reviews action items for this and we're in the first month of your
    planning for Jamboree on the Air.

    Dudley Allen, KD0NMD, will be activating KN0BSA at the Mid-America
    Council Goldenrod Winter Camporee at Camp Cedars near Fremont, NE from
    January 26th through the 28th. Members of the Mid-America Council Radio Scouting Group will provide a Ham radio demonstration station and
    participate in the annual Winter Field Day. They will use common scout frequencies across all bands that are open.

    The BSA National Radio Scouting Committee had their first meeting of the
    year on January 12th and there was a lot of good discussion surrounding comments and feedback received during the 2017 JOTA event. Some of the critical items that are being looked at are more guides and videos on
    using HF and digital voice modes, improving handouts and brochures about
    the event and radio scouting and continuing improvements to the content
    and training materials for the Radio Merit Badge program.

    January is an important month for planning your Jamboree on the Air
    event because this is the month that you get it into the calendar. JOTA
    is the weekend of October 19th through the 21st. While there was some
    success in pop-up JOTA events across the US, there were greater numbers
    and responses from those that planned in advance.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    (K2BSA)

    **
    NEW JERSEY TO WELCOME HAMS AND CITIZEN SCIENTISTS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: If you're a ham who's also a citizen scientist - and
    you especially follow the weather or an eclipse - you'll want to hear
    this report from Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    STEPHEN: Registration has opened for a two-day amateur radio event in
    New Jersey that will focus on last year's solar eclipse as well as ways
    to design personal weather stations. The 2018 HamSCI workshop will take
    place on the 23rd and 24th of February at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark. Nathan Frissell W2NAF, an assistant research
    professor at the school, said presentations by hams will feature reports
    on ionospheric observations made during last year's historic total
    eclipse of the sun. Hams will also explore ways radio operators and
    scientists in space weather can collaborate.

    Registration for attendees on Friday is $100 and includes breakfast,
    lunch and a ticket to the evening banquer. On Saturday, registration is
    $25 and includes breakfast and lunch.

    Organizers are looking for presenters as well as attendees. If you have
    an interest in sharing some of your own research or experience along
    these lines - especially related to the eclipse - contact Nathan no
    later than February 15.

    For more information send an email to: h a m s c i dot org (hamsci@hamsci.org).

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (HAMSCI.ORG)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for Charles, W0DLE, operating in Saigon
    as 3W9DLE between February and April. You can hear him on 20 meters
    using CW, SSB and FT8 and in the ARRL International CW DX Contest, which
    is taking place on the 17th and 18th of February. Charles will also participate in the Russian DX CW Contest which is on March 17th and
    18th. Send QSLs via W-ZERO-DLE.

    Hermann, HB9CRV, is using the call sign CU8FN from Flores Island in the
    Azores until February 16th. Listen for him on 160-10 meters using mainly
    FT8. He will be joined by Antonio, CU8AS, operating as CR2W in the CQWW
    160 Meter CW Contest which ends January 28th. Send QSLs via LoTW, or via HB9CRV, direct or by the Bureau.

    In the Bahamas, Tim, AF1G, is operating as C6ATH from Andros Island
    until further notice since he has a home there. You can listen for Tim
    mainly on weekends and holidays and during the week you may hear him in
    the evenings. QSL via LoTW or direct.

    In Nicaragua, operators Jim WB2REM and Mark WY1G will be using the call
    sign H7DX starting the 26th of February until the 6th of March. Listen
    on various HF bands where they will be using CW, SSB, and FT8. QSL via
    WY1G, direct or ClubLog's OQRS.


    **

    KICKER: HAM RADIO HELPS THE HOMELESS

    CHRISTIAN/ANCHOR: Our final story is a tribute to the difference ham
    radio operators can make. In earthquakes, in hurricanes, in wildfires -
    and even in the dead of an unseasonably cold winter - the presence of
    ham radio is a beacon of hope and fellowship. Jim Damron N8TMW has this
    report from Florida.

    JIM's REPORT: January has been a bitter cold month in much of
    east-central Florida but perhaps nowhere was it more brutal than on the streets where the homeless lay down to sleep. Freezing temperatures had
    the city of Titusville in its clutches in the early part of the month as
    the North Brevard Amateur Radio Club K4NBR set out to find those who
    huddled against the elements. After alerting local law-enforcement
    agencies, club members used their radios and their own cars, fanning out
    on a 12-hour mission find those in need of a warm bed and a roof over
    their heads. Club members such as Ricky DeLuco, K4JTT; Robert Ortiz,
    KJ4VEH; William Klosowski, K4SVT, and Michael Ellixon, KE4MWZ brought
    them them to warmth and safety inside the Disabled American Veteran
    Center in Titusville. Club members covered 120 miles and on their first
    night alone, bringing in five homeless individuals. More people in need,
    who had been located by city police, were also transported to shelters - including one who needed medical attention at a local hospital.

    The club's website states its mission as being dedicated to emergency communication for its communities. In this case, the word "community"
    extended well beyond those who have a place to call their own and the
    work proved even more lifesaving.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    (NORTH BREVARD AMATEUR RADIO CLUB)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; HAMSCI.ORG; the IARU; the Irish Radio
    Transmitters Society; K2BSA; North Brevard Amateur Radio Club; Ohio-Penn
    DX Bulletin; QRZ; South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio
    News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia;
    WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH in St. Louis
    Missouri saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, December 15, 2017 08:33:30
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2094 for Friday, December 15, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2094 with a release date of Friday, December 15, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams respond to the California wildfires. A
    group of Jewish radio operators make a wish at Hanukkah -- and in
    Illinois, a terminally ill ham gets the gift of a lifetime. All this and
    more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2094 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES SPUR HAM RESPONSE

    DON/ANCHOR: We open this week's newscast with a report about amateur
    radio response to the California wildfires. As Amateur Radio Newsline
    went to production, firefighters were still struggling to contain the
    massive Thomas Fire in southern California, where residents were being evacuated. As more evacuations were being planned on account of winds spreading the blaze, the need for ham assistance remained an open
    situation, especially in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Hams were actively supporting shelter communications and staffing at least four evacuation centers. Amateur Radio Newsline will continue to follow this
    story and updates will be posted on our Facebook page and on Twitter.


    **
    AMATEURS NOT SNOWED BY WINTER WEATHER IN U.S. SOUTH

    DON/ANCHOR: In other extremes of weather, hams stepped up recently to
    the challenge of major snow in the American South as we hear from
    Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The weather system that dumped the earliest snow that portions of Alabama have had in 54 years may have defied all reliable
    and trusted weather models but it was no match for amateur radio. The
    Dec. 8 snowfall surprised broadcast meteorologists and many at the
    National Weather Service but hams had already got down to helping the
    Alabama Emergency Management Agency pass along traffic from their
    various posts at EOC stations around the state. Hams staffing WA4EMA in Tuscaloosa County passed traffic to ARES members in the field across
    western Alabama throughout the day. One of the state's primary SKYWARN repeaters, the regional 2-meter station W4CUE in Birmingham, passed
    along reports that went to the Birmingham National Weather Service. In
    the east, WB4GNA, Alabama's highest 2-meter repeater at Cheaha
    (CHEE-HAH) Mountain, got reports from the east and west and even from
    Georgia.

    The Alabama State ARES Net frequencies were also buzzing, especially
    into Saturday as the snowfall was being tallied up.

    By Sunday, the city of Jacksonville Alabama had the distinction of the
    highest snowfall recorded - 12 inches - in Alabama. Jacksonville is
    located just west of the Georgia border. The rare snowfall turned out to
    be tough sledding for many in Alabama except, of course, the hams.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (BOBBY BEST WX4ALA)

    **
    VISITING AS A MOBILE IN NEW BRUNSWICK? NOT SO FAST

    DON/ANCHOR: If your travels have you thinking of operating mobile from Canada's province of New Brunswick, Kent Peterson KC0DGY has this
    cautionary tale.

    KENT: Since 1952 Canadian and American Amateur Radio licensees have been
    able to operate in each others countries. But the language in a recently passed distracted driving law in the province of New Brunswick allows
    mobile radio operation to only licensed Canadian hams. Newsline spoke
    with George Dewar VY2GF who lives in the neighboring province, Prince
    Edward Island.

    GEORGE: I think the American amateurs should know that if they come to
    New Brunswick and use their microphone here that they could be held in violation of the highway traffic act. News Brunswick was the only one
    that came up with this business you can't use a microphone in a car
    There were certain exceptions like a CB in a semi trailer was OK, you
    could use it for commercial purposes.

    KENT: Dewar points out driving regulations are not set by the Canadian federal government and can vary from province to province.

    GEORGE: I think somebody would be doing a great service if they could
    draw up a matrix of Canadian provinces of what the rules are and how you
    might be caught in them.

    KENT: Dewar hopes a ham organization might be able to influence perhaps
    the New Brunswick tourism ministry.

    GEORGE: The third biggest industry here in Prince Edward Island is
    tourism. If the minister of tourism in New Brunswick got wind of the
    ARRL putting out a press release saying the 750,000 licensed amateurs in
    the US were to avoidance going to new Brunswick they'd get the message.

    KENT: And Dewar shared with me his opinion of the new regulation.

    GEORGE: The legislation is ill conceived and what the did was declared amateurs who have a long history of public service to be idiots, and as
    far as I'm concerned only an idiot texts while driving.

    KENT: Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kent Peterson, KC0DGY.


    **

    GRANTING ONE HAM'S FINAL WISH

    DON/ANCHOR: Wish fulfillment holds a special place in everyone's hearts
    at this time of year. For one terminally ill amateur radio operator, the fulfillment of a wish to get on the air one more time meant everything,
    as we hear from Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: Spending time listening to certain parts of 20, 40 and 80 meters
    often makes you wonder about our hobby. But then something happens that reminds you why a lot of us got into amateur radio in the first place.
    The story of John Nugent, WA2EQJ, will hopefully restore your faith in
    your fellow hams.

    I spoke with Chris Brown, NY9X, of the Lake County, Illinois RACES organization about how granting a dying Vietnam veteran a final wish
    came to happen:

    BROWN: John is at the Federal Health Center over here at Great Lakes
    and has cancer and apparently does not have much time left. He had
    talked to his caseworker about being a ham radio operator and his love
    for the hobby. He’s been a ham for most of his life. He had a wish of
    getting on the air one more time and so the case worker started asking
    around as to how we could get this done, is there anybody who would be
    willing to help?

    PAUL: They finally got in touch with the hams at RACES who quickly came
    up with a plan to make that possible:

    BROWN: Our guys went over and set up a wire antenna outside on the
    grounds of the hospital and ran the coax in the front door and had a
    table there. They brought him down. We had a radio that was there — he
    loves his Yaesu so they brought that down and just set it on the table
    next to him.

    PAUL: Brown next went looking for possible contacts:

    BROWN: I just went down the band - I went down 20 meters and there was a
    QSO just wrapping up. There was a guy from California and I broke in and
    said, “Hey, is there any chance you can do me a favor and come up the
    band?” I explained what was going on, that we were Lake County RACES,
    and before I knew it he was already up there and he was almost like net control for 10, 15 minutes with John.

    PAUL: The afternoon was a success and created a definite bright spot in
    the final days of the long life of one ham.

    BROWN: His son was on the air too and just thanked everybody and said
    the expression on John’s face was fantastic with what he could do and he
    was talking.

    PAUL: Hams helping another ham in time of need. That, at the core, is
    what this hobby is about. All of us here at Amateur Radio Newsline will
    keep John Nugent and his family in our thoughts as he nears the end of
    his journey. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Paul Braun, WD9GCO.

    **

    SPOTTING THE SUNSPOTS OF LONG AGO

    DON/ANCHOR: It is said that there is nothing new under the sun - or even inside the sun, as Mike Askins KE5CXP tells us.

    MIKE: Sunspot patterns, it seems, have been a human obsession for at
    least 200 years -- at least that's what can be believed from a recent discovery made in the state of Maine.

    A report that appears on Space.com tells of a journal found inside a
    small house in that New England state with pages containing writings
    from some 200 years ago. The subject? Sunspots!

    The journal's contents in an academic paper coauthored recently by solar scientist William Denig of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
    Administration and historian Michael McVaugh of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    The 19th century devoted sun-watcher was a Congregational minister named Jonathan Fisher. The clergyman had at one time practiced a more
    scientific look at the heavens as a math and science student at Harvard University in the 18th century. When he graduated, however, he took up
    the clerical cloth. Still, he never forgot his lessons in science and
    when the Northern Hemisphere experienced what historians recall as a
    "year without a summer" in 1816, the reverend kept meticulous drawings
    of his observations in those now-faded pages.

    Clearly we have more advanced ways of tracking sunspots now but it's a
    comfort to know we hams aren't the only ones who have a tradition of
    keeping a watchful and sometimes nervous eye on the sky.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP


    (SPACE.COM)


    **

    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the N5OZG repeater
    in New Orleans, Louisiana on Sundays at 8 p.m.

    **
    HAMS HOPING FOR A HANUKKAH MIRACLE

    DON/ANCHOR: A group of Jewish amateur radio operators has big hopes for reviving a very old - and very beloved - net. Neil Rapp WB9VPG has that
    story.

    NEIL: The Jewish holiday known as Hanukkah is about miracles and one
    group of amateurs is hoping for a miracle or at least an unexpected opportunity to restart a beloved net begun long ago that linked Jewish amateurs across the miles.

    BOB: The organization was called Chaverim and it’s for Jewish hams, as
    we call ourselves the kosher hams. The organization had existed for many years. About 3 or 4 years ago because many of the members were getting
    old, the organization was more or less dissolved, although we did
    continue the nets.

    NEIL: That was Bob Schoenfeld, WA2AQQ. With only one chapter left and
    with original members growing older a Facebook group tried to resurrect
    more at one point. Bob has another suggestion too:

    BOB: We have been trying to get younger members. If they want to… If anybody’s interested when they hear this, they can contact me at my
    call, WA2AQQ@arrl.net and I will get in touch with them and we can
    arrange, you know, for either meeting… eyeball meetings, or eyeball
    QSOs, or whatever. If things are looking good I can even arrange, since
    I don’t have any equipment over here except that I can get on Echolink
    with my tablet or my cell phone, I might be able to arrange an Echolink
    net to start again.

    NEIL: Again, if you have an interest in reviving this net for Kosher
    hams, contact Bob at wa2aqq@arrl.net. Reporting for Amateur Radio
    Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

    **
    RADIO SCOUTS FILE FINAL JOTA REPORT

    DON/ANCHOR: Radio scout activations are fairly quiet this week but
    there's still Jamboree news, as we hear from Bill Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in Radio Scouting, it's quiet on the activation
    front as the winter holiday season sets in, however we have our final
    report out for JOTA 2017, we're looking towards JOTA 2018, and we talk
    about a new callsign becoming active.

    JOTA 2017 numbers are in for the U.S., and activity was down from 2016,
    but they were right in line with 2014 & 2015. 7,872 scouts, 4,753
    vistors and 958 Amateur Radio Operators, making 7,177 recorded contacts,
    made up the U.S. reportable numbers for this year. The feedback and
    comments received will go a long way into improving the guides we have
    for leaders and the advice we can pass on to future activators for
    making your event a success.

    With 2017 in the can, we have 10 months to prepare for JOTA 2018. It's
    time to take stock in what worked and what didn't. I, for one, will
    have to think about planning for wind in my 2018 activation. We were
    being hit by 25 to 40 mph winds at the park where we had our event,
    causing some of our equipment to go airborne. What changes are you
    going to implement in your 2018 plan? Now is the time to start that
    planning.

    A few people have started following some of the early chatter from the @NA1WJ_Scouting's twitter account. NA1WJ (or North America 1 World
    Jamboree) is the currently planned callsign and source of information on
    the radio scouting activation at the 2019 World Jamboree being held at
    The Summit in West Virginia. World Jamboree is held every four years at locations around the globe, and this time it has landed in North
    America. Please follow NA1WJ and K2BSA on this journey to make the
    World Jamboree a spotlight event for Scouting, STEM, and Amateur Radio.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **
    GERMANY OPTS OUT OF NEW ENTRY LEVEL LICENSE

    DON/ANCHOR: It looks like hams in Germany won't be seeing a new entry
    level license anytime soon, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Hopeful radio enthusiasts who were counting on the
    introduction of a new entry level amateur radio license in Germany are
    going to have to wait a little longer - in fact, they're going to have
    to wait indefinitely.

    The license won't be happening, despite the fact that recent reports
    from Germany show that licensing is on the decline in that nation.
    Statistics show Germany having a peak of 80,000 licensed amateurs in
    2002. By 2015 the number of license holders had slipped to 67,349.

    In recent years, the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club, or DARC, has been
    promoting amateur radio among young people and has been offering a free
    online training course. Figures show an increase in 2015 in the numbers
    of applicants taking license exams but, for now, there will be no
    entry-level category for radio operators.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **
    EVEN SANTA NEEDS A BREAK

    DON/ANCHOR: If this time of year has you believing in reindeer that fly
    and a bearded ham in a big red suit, you may want to hear this report
    from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: Where does Santa Claus stop to refuel on his journeys? If
    you said eastern Europe, that correct response would land you squarely
    on his "nice" list. A special event station in Romania, featuring Santa
    and his elves, is on the bands all month with the call signs YP2XMAS
    through YP9XMAS as well as YP0XMAS. The event is being sponsored by the Romanian Radioclub Association, which will also send QSL cards along
    with awards that are delivered electronicallly to any station working at
    least three different YP XMAS call signs. Sorin YO2MSB will be among
    those to reprise the role of Santa - and yes, he'll have his elves with
    him. Join the pileup and your name will be entered in this year's Yule Log.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (ROMANIAN RADIOCLUB ASSOCIATION)

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for lots of signals coming from
    Vietnam. Dirk, DF2XG, is active as 3W9XG from Hai Phong where he is
    working as a project manager for an industrial venture. Listen for him
    on 40 meters through 10 meters. He will be running 20 watts and
    operating CW. For QSL information, visit QRZ.com.

    Also in Vietnam is John KB4FB, who will begin operating as 3W9FB from Da
    Nang sometime in early January. He will then move on to Laos and operate
    as XW4FB before returning to Vietnam in February. He will be on a number
    of different HF bands throughout. Send QSLs via LoTW. QSOs will be
    uploaded to LoTW in March 2018.

    In the Gambia, Przemyslaw, SP3PS, will be active as C5/SP3PS between the
    30th of December and the 12th of January. Listen for him on 40, 20 and
    10 meters. Send QSLs via his home callsign.

    **

    KICKER: 'TWAS THE END OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSCAST

    DON/ANCHOR: Finally, we hope you enjoyed the holiday gift Amateur Radio Newsline gave you last year at this same time because, well....we're
    giving you the same gift again this year as we close this week's
    newscast. It's the popular amateur radio interpretation of a Clement
    Clarke Moore classic -- and we promise to deliver with no QRM. Here's
    Jim Damron N8TMW:

    JIM: Twas the night before Christmas and all through the shack
    The rig was turned off and the mic cord lay slack

    The antenna rotor had made its last turn, the tubes in the linear had
    long ceased to burn.

    I sat there relaxing and took off my specs, preparing to daydream of
    Armchair DX
    When suddenly outside I heard such a sound, I dashed out the door to see
    what was around.

    The moon shone down brightly and lighted the night. For sure propagation
    for the low bands was right.

    I peered toward the roof where I heard all the racket and there was some
    guy in a red, fur-trimmed jacket!

    I stood there perplexed in a manner quite giddy: Just who WAS this
    stranger? di di dah dah di dit?

    He looked very much like an FCC guy who'd come to check up on some bad TVI.

    I shouted to him: "Old man...QR-Zed?"
    "Hey you by the chimney all dressed up in red!"

    I suddenly knew when I heard sleigh bells jingle
    The guy on the rooftop was Jolly Kris Kringle

    He had a big sack full of amateur gear which was a big load for his
    prancing reindeer.
    Transmitters, receivers, for cabinets and racks
    Some meters and scopes and a lot of co-ax.

    He said not a word 'cause he'd finished his work.
    He picked up his sack and he turned with a jerk.
    As he leaped to his sleigh, he shouted with glee
    And I knew in a moment he'd be QRT.

    I heard him transmit as he flew o'er the trees
    "Merry Christmas to all, and to all seventy-three."

    "Ho Ho Ho"

    (over Santa): For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron, N8TMW.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Bobby Best WX4ALA; the Capital Gazette; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Mark Bova W2PAW; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Romanian Radioclub Association; Southgate Amateur
    Radio News; Space.com; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute
    of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW in Picayune,
    Mississippi saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, December 22, 2017 14:18:08
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2095 for Friday, December 22, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2095 with a release date of Friday, December 22, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A ham radio operator's killer gets prison. Hams
    in Hong Kong mark an important anniversary - and Dayton Hamvention's
    getting a whole lot more space. All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2095 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    PRISON FOR ILLINOIS HAM'S KILLER

    JIM/ANCHOR: Our top story this week brings a conclusion to a gruesome
    case, the killing of an amateur radio operator more than two years ago
    in rural Illinois. The killer has been sentenced, as we hear from Paul
    Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: The man who killed amateur radio operator Henry Murphy WB9TFX of Rockford, Illinois after robbing him, shooting his golden retriever and setting his home on fire in 2015 has been sentenced to 90 years in prison.

    Delano Foreman was convicted this past summer of fatally shooting Henry Murphy, a 67-year-old Army veteran. He also shot and killed the ham
    radio operator's dog, Shelby.

    According to the Rockford Register Star, Delano Foreman's attorney had
    urged Circuit Judge Ronald White to impose the minimum sentence of 20
    years. The attorney, Erin Hannigan, asked the court to consider
    Foreman's difficult upbringing with a drug-addicted mother and a father
    in prison.

    The judge, however, said the killing reflected [quote] "a complete
    disregard for human life." [endquote]

    The attorney plans to file a motion for the sentence to be reconsidered.

    According to the Rockford Star Register, prosecutors had requested a
    100-year prison sentence for the killer, saying he had a criminal record dating to 1996 in juvenile court and had been a gang member since the
    age of 10.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (ASSOCIATED PRESS, ROCKFORD STAR REGISTER)

    **
    HAMVENTION'S NEW HOME GETTING AN OVERHAUL

    JIM/ANCHOR: May will be here before you know it and that means
    Hamvention 2018. It looks like Ohio's Greene County Fairgrounds will be providing hams with a whole lot more space, as we hear from Neil Rapp
    WB9VPG.

    NEIL: There is some building-up and some rearranging planned for the
    Greene County Fairgrounds in Ohio and much of it is being done with
    Hamvention 2018 in mind. The fairgounds, which made its debut in May as
    the new home of Hamvention, is getting a new Expo Center. Hamvention organizers announced on Wednesday, Dec. 20 that construction will begin
    soon and the project is moving forward with the goal of accommodating Hamvention 2018 this spring. Hamvention will also gain use of another
    building that is being vacated by longterm tenant Fairgrounds Furniture.

    The furniture store, which lost its lease in August, had been a fixture
    on the site and did business
    there for more than 40 years. Owner Melissa Smith told the Dayton Daily
    News that a major liquidation sale was under way. At the time the
    fairgrounds board of directors elected to end the store's lease, board president Jerry Liming was quoted in news reports as saying that
    negotiations to relocate the store to accommodate Hamvention had been unsuccessful. The store has until April to vacate.

    No details about the additional square footage available to Hamvention
    were given at the time this news was released but Hamvention organizers
    said they were assured that the additional floorspace will exceed the
    area of the tents that housed activities this past spring.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG

    (DAYTON HAMVENTION, DAYTON DAILY NEWS)

    **

    SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE IN HONG KONG

    JIM/ANCHOR: If you happen to be DXing and you hear a call sign with the
    prefix VR20, listen up! Jeremy Boot G4NJH explains:

    JEREMY'S REPORT: The call sign prefix VR20 is an important one for hams
    in Hong Kong: it marks the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China.

    On July 1, 1997, Britain ended its rule in Hong Kong and the former
    crown colony was reunified with the mainland. The British had acquired
    Hong Kong from China in 1842 at the conclusion of the first Opium War.
    By 1949, the island became a sanctuary for refugees fleeing communist
    rule. In 1984, after years of discussion, Britain and China finally came
    to terms with the fact that at some point Hong Kong should be handed
    back. That became a reality in 1997.

    So naturally the hams in Hong Kong are marking this important
    anniversary. They're able to use the new prefix on a purely voluntary
    basis through the 30th of June 2018. Be listening!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    SILENT KEY: MARGARET 'HOLLY' BEVAN N3MB

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Maryland, amateurs have been grieving the loss of a one-of-a-kind YL who had a major voice in the hobby. Kevin Trotman N5PRE
    tells us more.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: If you're a ham in the Maryland area, you have likely
    heard of The Holly Net. The Anne Arundel Radio Club's on-air gathering
    was run by Holly Bevan N3MB. The retired teacher was a lifetime member
    of the club, and at 101 years of age, the Extra Class licensee was a
    respected veteran YL.

    Holly became a Silent Key on the 9th of December. Her decades of
    activity with the amateur radio club included her work as a Volunteer
    Examiner and her work as a Field Day ambassador for the yearly event. On
    the occasion of her 100th birthday in March of 2016, she told the
    Capital Gazette newspaper that she had become a ham at a time when fewer
    YLs were involved in the hobby than they are today. The newspaper noted
    that she began studying for her license in 1979 at the encouragement of
    her son Michael who was serving the Navy on board a ship and wanted to
    stay in touch.

    She herself was a military veteran and became part of the first group of enlisted Navy WAVES in 1942. It was during her time in the service that
    her first name, Margaret, was substituted with the nickname "Holly,"
    short for Holloway, her last name at the time.

    According to Mark Bova W2PAW, Holly Bevan's voice on the Davidsonville
    AARC repeater could be heard weekday mornings starting at 6 a.m. and
    earned her a following throughout the region.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (DX News; Reddit.com)

    **
    SILENT KEY: ROLAND PEDDLE VE6RL

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Canada, the amateur radio community has lost a beloved
    Hall of Famer. Ed Durrant DD5LP has that story.

    ED's REPORT: Just weeks after his induction into the Canadian Amateur
    Radio Hall of Fame, Roland Peddle VE6RL has become a Silent Key. Roland,
    who had also held the call sign VO1BD, had most recently been honored on November 28th at his induction ceremony in Lethbridge Alberta.

    A native of St. John's, Newfoundland, the retired high school teacher
    began his radio experience as a shortwave listener before becoming
    licensed as a ham in 1952. His first call sign was VO1D which later
    became VO1BD after Newfoundland and Labrador reorganized their call signs.

    He had been president of the Newfoundland Radio Club, editor of their newsletter, emergency coordinator for the Amateur Radio Emergency Corps
    and assistant Atlantic Director for Radio Amateurs of Canada and its predecessor, the CRRL.

    His book "Marconi to the Mobile Age: A History of Amateur Radio in Newfoundland and Labrador" is scheduled for publication in 2018.

    Upon learning earlier in the month of his Hall of Fame induction, Roland
    told Radio Amateurs of Canada [quote] "Amateur Radio is a wonderful
    activity and especially for young people learning new technology
    [endquote.] He said that [quote] "the best part is the people you'll
    meet along the way." [endquote]

    Roland died Dec. 7 at the age of 86.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    CLARIFYING NEWSLINE'S NEW BRUNSWICK STORY

    JIM/ANCHOR: Last week's Newsline report included a story about
    distracted driving regulations in the province of New Brunswick. Kent
    Peterson KC0DGY has an update as the nature of this story evolves.

    KENT: Radio Amateurs of Canada Atlantic Director Dave Goodwin VE9CB took exception to a number of points in a Newsline story released on December
    15th on distracted driving regulations in New Brunswick Canada. Newsline
    has requested clarification on the driving regulations from the New
    Brunswick attorney general and will be preparing a follow-up story.
    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kent Petereson KC0DGY.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including the
    KJ3LR repeater in Bradenton, Florida, on Fridays at 10 p.m.

    **
    DISTRACTED-DRIVING LAW EXEMPTION EXTENDED IN ONTARIO

    JIM/ANCHOR: In more distracted-driving newss---In Ontario, officials are giving ham radio operators a break behind the wheel. With those details, here's Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER: Mobile ham radio operators in the Canadian province of Ontario
    are going to get the break they were seeking: Ontario's Ministry of Transportation has announced that it is extending the current exemption
    from its distracted-driving law for another three years, beginning
    January first. This means that amateurs will be able to drive while
    making use of handheld two-way radios in Ontario. Until now, that right
    was granted under a five-year exemption that would otherwise have
    expired on the first day of the new year.

    RAC Directors Phil McBride, V-A-3-Q-R, told Amateur Radio Newsline on
    December 15th that the extension was granted after much hard work and negotiation. Phil and Allan Boyd, V-E-3-A-J-B had been working with
    Ontario Transportation officials to see that some kind of exemption was preserved.

    It will now stay in place until January first, 2021.

    Although the RAC's goal is to achieve a permanent exemption, the group
    praised the MTO's action as being helpful. The RAC said it was
    nonetheless committed to achieving a more permanent solution for the
    province. It is important to note however that the use of handheld
    two-way radios by drivers is a permission granted by governments in each province and is does not fall under Canada's overall regulatory system.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    (RAC)

    **
    NEW SCHOLARSHIP FOR YOUNG WISCONSIN HAMS

    JIM/DAMRON: If you're young, smart and live in Wisconsin - or know of a
    young ham who is - this next story from Geri Goodrich KF5KRN is for you.

    GERI'S REPORT: The Ozaukee Radio Club W9CQO in Wisconsin has funded a
    new ARRL Foundation scholarship to help a qualifying amateur radio
    operator who is a full-time undergraduate at a four-year degree-granting school. Applicants should be younger than 26 and must be U.S. citizens
    and residents of Wisconsin. The students applying should show a high
    academic level of performance in their studies, which can be in any
    field. The $2,000 scholarship from the Cedarburg, Wisconsin club will be administered by the ARRL foundation and can be used toward books,
    tuition, on-campus housing, school fees and any other costs related to
    the winner's college education. Applicants also need to submit
    recommendations and personal statements.

    The ARRL Foundation was established in 1973 and administers programs
    funded by radio amateurs and friends.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    **
    TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO COURT CRACKS DOWN ON UNLICENSED OPERATION

    JIM/ANCHOR: An amateur radio operator in Trinidad and Tobago will learn
    in just a few weeks what the courts have in store for him, as we hear
    from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN: The courts in Trinidad and Tobago are expected to rule in a little
    more than a month on sanctions being taken against a ham radio operator
    there who was transmitting without a license.

    The courts found Desi-Lee Bonterre guilty of operating without a license
    from his home in Point Cumana in Carenage in 2007. He was charged in
    September of that year. The Telecommunications Authority, TATT,
    eventually did grant him a license and his attorney Sastri Roberts
    requested leniency on behalf of Bonterre, saying that he was active in
    radio emergency response. Southgate Amateur Radio News notes that
    Bonterre is listed as an Extra class licensee in the U.S. and that he is
    a member of Radio Emergency Association Citizen Team, or REACT, and an American Red Cross volunteer. There is also a record of him holding a
    U.S. call sign in 2008.

    His QRZ profile lists him as an ARRL member, a resident of Brooklyn, New
    York and a master certified electronics technician.

    During his trial, Bonterre testified that he had told police, when they visited his home and found the transmitters, that he was repairing some
    of them at the time. The courts are set to make their ruling on his
    punishment in February.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **
    FCC PROPOSES FINE AGAINST MANUFACTURER

    JIM/ANCHOR: An Atlanta company faces a stiff penalty from the Federal Communications Commission for failing to comply with technical
    regulations. Skeeter Nash N5ASH has those details.

    SKEETER: The FCC has proposed a $25,000 fine against a Georgia-based
    maker of fluorescent lighting ballasts for failing to label them as
    required by Part 18 rules in effect at the time of manufacture. The FCC
    said that the ballasts, two models in 2006 and one since 2009 - were
    required to have the FCC logo attached.

    At the time the models were manufactured, the logo was mandatory as a
    way of letting buyers know that the device had undergone compliance
    testing. Compliance with the rule has since become voluntary.

    The FCC issued a Notice of Apparent Liability against Acuity Brands Inc.
    of Atlanta on November 21st.

    The FCC said it raised its initial proposed penalty because Acuity
    continued to sell two of the models for a six-month period after it
    first notified the company of alleged noncompliance.

    The FCC noted that devices that are not in compliance with the agency's technical rules are capable of causing unwanted interference.

    A report on Southgate Amateur news said Acuity did submit test reports
    showing two of the ballast models met technical requirements but the
    company did acknowledge that for nearly a decade, three models of the
    ballasts were missing the FCC logo.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    WORLD OF DX


    Be listening through December 29th for Mauri, AG1LE operating as E51DXX
    from Rarotonga in the South Cook Islands. He is working holiday style on
    the HF bands using SSB, PSK31 and FT8. QSL to his home call.

    In the Solomon Islands, listen for Shane, VK4KHZ who is operating as
    H44DA until early January 2018. Listen for Shane on 80 to 10 meters, and satellite SO-50, but with a primary emphasis on 6
    meters. QSL direct to home call.

    Rieder, HB9FIH is in the Canary Islands operating as EA8/HB9FIH until
    the end of March 2018. Be listening on 80 to 10 meters, and possibly 6 meters, where Rider will be using CW, RTTY, PSK and some SSB. QSL to
    home call.

    From the Republic of Korea, you can hear Special Event station DT23WOP
    who started their operation on December 1st. celebrating the Winter
    Olympic Games. They will run until February 28th of 2018. Send QSLs via HL1IWD.


    **

    FLORIDA 'SANTA-HAM' SHOWS HOSPITAL BEDSIDE MANNER

    JIM/ANCHOR: Just when you thought there couldn't possibly be one more
    ham radio story about Santa Claus, along comes this report from Tampa, Florida, where a group of young hospital patients got the kind of
    medicine that can only be delivered via antenna and radio receiver.
    We'll let Mike Askins KE5CXP take it from here:

    MIKE: At this time of the year, almost all children want a little magic
    but perhaps no kids want it more than those who are in the hospital.
    Inside St. Joseph's Children's Hospital, the Child Life team partnered
    with the Bay Area Emergency Amateur Service for Santa to make a house call....er, a hospital call.

    In this case, the North Pole was a lot closer than you might think: the
    hams' station is actually housed inside the hospital's emergency communications center where it operates with the call sign W4TCH. That's
    where the hams are based all year long but at this time of year, for
    nine years counting, it has been turned into Santa Net Control.

    The Bay Area hams' coordinator Christopher Perry KJ4JHT said he never
    tires of the smiles it brings, not to mention the sense of reassurance
    to the kids that although they are hospitalized, they aren't forgotten.

    Radio: It's just what the doctor ordered. And at this time of the year,
    no one has a better bedside manner than Santa himself.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (PR NEWSWIRE)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the Associated Press; CQ
    Magazine; the Dayton Daily News; Dayton Hamvention; DX News; the FCC;
    Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; PR Newswire; Radio Amateurs of Canada; Reddit.com; the Rockford Star Register; Southgate
    Amateur Radio News; Space.com; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's
    all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address
    at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur
    Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron, N8TMW in Charleson, West
    Virginia saying 73...and continued Christmas and New Year's Best Wishes.
    As always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, December 29, 2017 12:33:22
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2096 for Friday, December 29, 2017

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2096 with a release date of Friday, December 29, 2017 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Short wave service returns to part of Australia.
    A West Virginia school ham club has a special role -- and get ready for Contest University! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report
    2096 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART


    **

    NEW 60 METER SHORT WAVE LAUNCHES in AUSTRALIA

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's report with word that 60 meter short
    wave service is now operating in a part of Australia that have been
    without short wave for almost a year. This is welcome news to listeners,
    as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: At last, short wave radio station 4KZ is on the air at
    5055 kHz from Queensland, Australia. Signal reports are coming in from
    New Zealand and parts of North America. Al Kirton VK4FFKZ general
    manager of NQ Radio, reports that transmissions started on the 20th of December and currently will be at half-power, or 500 watts, until
    repairs can be made of one of the RF boards. The station will then
    operate regularly at its 1 kW of power using an inverted V antenna at a
    site in Tropical North Queensland. Although the 60 meter transmissions
    are intended for the listening audience in the northern outback and the
    Cape York area, signal reports have come in from as far away as New
    South Wales, Victoria, New Zealand, Canada's province of Alberta and
    even Monterey, California in the U.S.

    Australian Broadcasting Corporation ended its short wave transmissions
    to the northern outback in January.

    If you're interested in listening for the signal and want to receive a
    4KZ shortwave QSL card, be listening from 0500 to 2300 hours UTC and
    send your report to Al Kirton by writing to Al at nqradio dot com dot au (al@nqradio.com.au) or to Radio 4KZ, P.O. Box 19, Innisfail Queensland
    4860 Australia.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (WIA)

    **

    IRISH HAMS' TRIBUTE TO A DOOMED FLIGHT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Ireland, a special event station is getting ready to
    mark a particularly somber event. It was the biggest tragedy in the
    country's aviation history, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: Mystery still surrounds the deadly crash in 1968 of Aer Lingus
    Flight 712, an event that came to be known as the Tuskar Rock tragedy.
    The 61 people on board the Vickers Viscount 803 aircraft perished when
    it crashed into the Irish Sea, making it the worst air disaster in Irish
    civil aviation history.
    Starting on the 22nd of January and continuing through the 24th of March
    - the fiftieth anniversary of the crash, Special Event Station EI50AOM
    will remember that flight from Cork, which was bound for London's
    Heathrow Airport when tragedy struck.

    The amateur radio operators are devoting each day to a different victim.
    The passengers and crew were from Sweden, the Netherlands, the U.S., Switzerland, Britain, Belgium and Ireland. According to various news
    reports, only 14 bodies were ever found.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.


    (IRTS, QRZ)


    **

    NEW SCHOOL HAM CLUB IS ANYTHING BUT ACADEMIC

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Amateur radio is all about communications but as one group
    of students in West Virginia is learning, it can mean so much more. Neil
    Rapp WB9VPG explains.

    NEIL: It's always exciting to hear about a new high school ham radio
    club getting on the air. But this one had a little twist. In fact, it
    took me a while to get in touch with this group that has introduced ham
    radio to Pocahontas County High School in Dunmore, West Virginia because
    they have no cellular telephone service. It's /not necessarily by
    choice. The entire county is inside the United States National Quiet
    Zone near the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. So when students had the chance to talk to the rest of the
    world on something other than a cable... they were more than interested. I
    had a chance to speak with Rudy Marrujo, KD8WPG about the visit to the
    school from the Eight Rivers Ham Club.

    RUDY: We want to show these kids, hey... Pocahontas County is not the only place in the world. It's a big world. And, you know, when a child talks
    to someone in London or Australia, imagine looking at the smile between
    their ears. It's ear to ear!

    NEIL: When the Eight Rivers Ham Club members visit the school, they are teaching not only how to communicate with the outside world, but also
    how to build the antennas and equipment to do so. And, they have a
    limited amount of time available.

    RUDY: [We have] two times a month that we can do it for an hour, each
    class. We have to summarize everything that we can give to a student. So
    we make a major impact in one hour.

    NEIL: An HF rig and some handhelds are already in a classroom at the
    school, and all the students who pass the license exam will be given a
    free handheld radio. Best of luck to yet another school sharing the love
    of ham radio with students, and in this case sharing an entire world
    that otherwise might not be well-known. Reporting for Amateur Radio
    Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, in the New York suburb of West Islip, Long
    Island, another high school group will soon know the same excitement
    they're feeling in West Virginia. Students at West Islip High School
    have just been assigned a call sign and are awaiting approval of their requested vanity call WI2HS. Ben Piecora KD2NOU and teacher Brian
    Buonomo KD2FKP, the club trustee, are working together to help moves
    things forward. The weeks ahead will be spent setting up logbooks and
    other details in anticipation of getting the new call sign and, of
    course, antennas and radios. There's never been a ham club in the
    school, said Ben, who has promised to keep Newsline updated. We can't
    wait to hear what comes next in the new year for this new school club.

    **

    IN DAYTON, IT'S SCHOLARSHIP SEASON

    PAUL/ANCHOR: If you happen to be a student, it's not too early to start thinking about applying for a scholarship to one of the most competitive universities in the ham radio universe - Contest University. Here's
    Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER'S REPORT: Registration has opened for Dayton Contest University
    which is holding classes on Thursday the 17th of May at the Crowne Plaza
    Hotel in Dayton Ohio, one day before Hamvention kicks off in Xenia.
    Students who are 25 and younger can apply for scholarships which are
    available through the Northern California DX Foundation. Discounts on registration are also available for attendees who are presenting a talk
    at Hamvention or have presented any educational session for hams at a
    hamfest since May 17 of 2017.

    In the 12 years since Contest University has taken place, more than
    7,000 amateurs have attended to pick up tips and sharpen their skills.
    For additional information, visit the website at contest university dot
    com (contestuniversity.com), and then get ready to search and pounce!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    (CONTEST UNIVERSITY)

    **

    NEW ARRL SECTION MANAGER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Hams in North Dakota are welcoming a new ARRL section
    manager, Nancy Yoshida, KG0YL, who will take on her role on January first.

    Nancy is an ARRL Life Member and has served as North Dakota Section
    Emergency Coordinator since 2011. Her interest in ham radio began after
    she volunteered to help with communications for Alaska's Iditarod Sled
    Dog Race.

    Nancy takes over from Lynn Nelson W0ND, who has been elected ARRL Dakota Division Vice Director

    (AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE)

    **

    SILENT KEY: EDUCATOR, SCOUT LEADER LYNDA DAVIDSON KI6AWI

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In California, hams are grieving for a YL who took a
    special interest in radio -- and radio Scouting. Stephen Kinford N8WB
    has that story.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The California amateur radio community has lost a
    teacher, a mentor and a friend. Lynda Davidson KI6AWI became a Silent
    Key on Dec. 3 after a lifetime spent as a career educator and a
    volunteer Elmer of both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts in the hobby. She was especially active in the Venture Scouts, a coeducational program for
    teens who enjoy outdoor adventures. She also served as assistant
    Scoutmaster for Troop 27 and Crew Advisor for Crew 27. Lynda also
    devoted her time to being a Merit Badge Counselor.

    According to her longtime friend Donn Lovell K8DLL, she believed in
    giving back to Scouting in any way she could but most especially using
    radio through her association with amateur radio station K2BSA and the
    local Scouting radio club using call sign KZ6BSA. She spent much of her
    career as a teacher in both secondary public and private schools in
    Washington and California and was a founding member of the Crossroads Enrichment Center.

    Lynda Davidson was 70.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB

    (DONN LOVELL K8DLL)


    **
    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    Cookeville Repeater Association's W4HPL repeater in Cookeville,
    Tennessee on Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. Central Time.

    **
    MISSOURI AMATEUR HONORED FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: While community service amateur radio isn't about
    recognition and prizes, when honors come, they're extra important
    because they put radio operators in the public spotlight. That's what
    recently happened in Missouri, as we hear from Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    CHRISTIAN: The emergency coordinator for Johnson County's Amateur Radio Emergency Services isn't just a Missouri resident dedicated to assisting
    in times of crisis, he's an amateur radio operator with a strong
    volunteer spirit. Rick Ebbesen KB0VZP has become this year's recipient
    of the State of Missouri Volunteer of the Year award for his work and
    his contributions according to a report in the Daily Star-Journal. The newspaper notes that the Johnson County ARES trailer was created with
    funding from him. The vehicle has the capability of tying its mobile
    camera into a "mesh network" used to transmit data, text messages and
    VOIP and during severe situations, such as storms.

    His most recent project consists of helping emergency managers make the
    move from simplex radio communications to a repeater system to expand countywide coverage.

    The agency's executive director Gloria Brandenburg told the newspaper
    that Ebbeson's volunteer tenure dates to 2002 when she was in charge of
    the American Red Cross office. She said he later split his time between
    the Red Cross and the county until the Red Cross office closed.

    His time has been invested well: The communications trailer assisted in
    Henry County when a telephone outage caused ambulance service to lose
    touch with the 911 call center. Rick also provided a radio charging
    facility and communications for first-responders during the search for a
    lost child in Johnson County.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    (THE DAILY STAR-JOURNAL)


    **

    THIS CALL SIGN IS A 'CAPITOL' IDEA

    PAUL/ANCHOR: As the state of Alabama prepares for its bicentennial celebration, public officials aren't the only ones getting into the act.
    Hams are too, as we hear from Bobby Best WX4ALA.

    BOBBY: Maybe she isn't a ham radio operator - at least not yet - but
    Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey sure knows how to activate a new call sign. On the state's 198th birthday, the public official became the first person to
    use call sign AL2C, which will be in use by amateurs until 2019, which
    marks the state's bicentennial.

    The governor's contact was with the Lee County Emergency Management
    Agency and she spoke about the state's bicentennial plans with Otto
    Arnoscht N4UZZ, the trustee of the call sign. The QSO took place from a
    D-Star VHF station in the Old House Chamber in the Capitol building in Birmingham - a station set up by the Alabama Bicentennial Amateur Radio
    Club.

    Since the bicentennial isn't for a little while yet, that gives the
    governor time to plan for her ticket - and this time we don't mean the political one.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bobby Best WX4ALA

    (ARRL)

    **
    VACANCY FILLED IN CRITICAL MONITORING SYSTEM

    PAUL/ANCHOR: An important post has just been filled at a vital
    monitoring system that identifies intruders on the amateur bands. John Williams VK4JJW has those details.

    JOHN'S REPORT: The ARRL/IARU Monitoring System, which keeps an eye out
    for inappropriate signals on the bands, has filled a vacancy in IARU
    Region 2. On January first, Carlos Beviglia LU1BCE of Buenos Aires,
    Argentina, becomes the Monitoring System coordinator for that region. He
    will be responsible for keeping track of intruder reports, verifying
    them and if necessary, enlist the help of other hams and short-wave
    listeners to investigate further. Typical sources of intrusion on the
    ham bands include unlicensed operators, Over the Horizon Radar and
    shortwave broadcasters.

    Carlos has been licensed since the age of 16 and is a third-generation
    ham in his family. He has been president of the Radio Club of Argentina
    and in 2016 he was involved in the club's Summer Antarctic Campaign at
    LU1ZI in the South Shetland Islands. His preferred mode of operation is CW.

    The monitoring system is a global service designed to protect the
    amateur services on the air. Each of the IARU's regional organizastions chooses a local coordinator.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW

    (IARU)

    **

    WORLD OF DX


    In the world of DX, you have until the 5th of January to contact Mauro EA8/IV3HAX operating from the Canary Islands. Mauro can be found on
    various HF bands with an emphasis on 160 and 80 meters using CW, RTTY
    and FT8. Send QSL cards to IV3HAX direct, LoTW or ClubLog's OQRS.

    Members of the Qatar Amateur Radio Society are active as A70X from Al
    Safliyah Island from the first of January through the sixth. Listen for
    them on various HF bands using CW, SSB and the digital modes. QSL via
    M0OXO or OQRS.

    Between the 3rd and 16th of January you can listen for Ken LA7GIA and
    Adrian KO8SCA operating as Six-Oh-Six-Oh from Somalia. They will be on
    160-10 meters using CW, SSB, RTTY and FT8. Send QSL cards via M0OXO and
    his OQRS. This is a DXpedition that is raising money for Doctors Without Borders and its work in Somalia.

    In Israel, Larry K2LS will operate as 4X/K2LS from Ramat Bet Shemesh
    between the 10th of January and the 6th of February. He will be using
    mainly CW. QSL via K2LS, direct, by the Bureau or LoTW.

    **

    KICKER: COCKER SPANIEL PUP GETS TO 'PARK AND BARK'

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, we close our report with this question: What
    happens when a well-behaved puppy gets introduced to a pretty
    well-behaved group of hams? Jeremy Boot G4NJH answers that question for
    us now.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: The purpose of the North Cheshire Amateur Radio Club is stated clearly on its website: members gather to talk about all aspects
    of radio, to experiment with equipment and try new things and of course,
    to socialize and perhaps even gossip. The club's website notes that
    visitors are very welcome.

    So it should be no surprise when one of its more recent visitors to be welcomed was a cocker spaniel puppy. The 10-week-old pup named Connie
    was brought to the club's meeting on Sunday the 17th of December as part
    of her training.

    No, she wasn't preparing for a Foundation license exam or even hoping to upgrade an existing license. She was, however, definitely on track for
    the next stage of her development - to become a Hearing Dog for the deaf.

    According to club member Terry Roeves G3RKF such service dogs must
    display good behavior and a calm manner under all circumstances.

    Where better to test out a dog's promise than in a room full of
    talkative, enthusiastic amateur radio operators? Any dog who can handle
    THAT kind of QRM is sure to enjoy a successful career helping someone
    who is deaf or hearing-impaired.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (THE WILMSLOW.CO.UK WEBSITE)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Contest University; the Daily Star-Journal; Donn Lovell K8DLL; Hap Holly and the
    Rain Report; the IARU; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; Ohio-Penn
    DX Bulletin; QRZ; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; the Wilmslow UK website; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2017. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Monday, January 01, 2018 16:17:36

    Amateur Radio Newsline headlines for Ham Nation. January 3, 2018.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XdbqCGjeIs&feature=youtu.be


    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org

    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the
    world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the
    internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12.
    We hope you enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related
    to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 7bit)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, January 05, 2018 17:33:30
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2097 for Friday, January 5, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2097 with a release date of Friday, January 5 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A licensing exam puts more than 100 new hams on
    the air in Cuba. An Australian amateur group marks 60 years -- and a
    veteran grid square chaser recalls his successes! All this and more as
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2097 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    ARRL'S INTERNATIONAL GRID CHASE HAS BEGUN

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: As hams start the new year learning the ins and outs of
    the Maidenhead grid squares that mark locations for U.S. contacts, one longtime radio operator in Texas recalls his own chase across the grid
    and the hard-won success it ultimately brought him. Jim Damron N8TMW has
    that story.

    JIM: The dawn of a new year has brought the ARRL International Grid
    Chase, which is challenging hams to operate on any band except 60 meters
    in pursuit of as many different Maidenhead grid squares as they can
    possibly work. Newsline managed to catch up with a veteran of this kind
    of grid square victory - Pat Rose, W5OZI, of Junction, Texas. In 2010,
    Pat became the second recipient of the ARRL's Fred Fish Memorial Award.
    The award is given to hams who successfully work all 488 grid squares in
    the contiguous United States. Pat became the first ham to replicate on 6 meters what Fred Fish himself had accomplished before becoming a Silent
    Key.

    Pat told Newsline that he once believed working all 488 grids was
    impossible. He said because it was a new award at the time he thought it
    would be fun to try. He wrote in his email to us: [quote] "I had no
    strategy, but I thought that with a good antenna and with a kilowatt
    from a home-built linear amp I would have a chance at competing against
    some big-time six-meter ops."

    He even ended up working some rare grids. He told us in his email:
    [quote] "I finally worked KB8U, Russ in CM79 on June 17, 2010 for the
    last one when he went back-packing there. I worked him I think the
    second day he was there. It was a big surprise and I have thanked him
    over and over again for his trip." [endquote]

    So as you consider this year's event, remember Pat's success and know
    that persistence surely pays off: Pat has been licensed since 1948. He
    was 17 years old when he hitchhiked from Austin, Texas to Dallas that
    year to take the test. That was the first of his many successes since.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    **
    DX CONVENTION GOES THE DISTANCE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: April will be here before you know it - and so will the International DX Convention, as we hear from Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER: If you're wanting an early seat at the table for the
    International DX Convention, you can secure yourself a spot in just a
    few days. Registration opens on the 15th of January for the 69th annual
    event.

    The convention is sponsored by the Southern California DX Club and is
    being held April 20th to 22nd at the Visalia Convention Center. The
    keynote speech at Saturday's banquet will focus on the Bouvet Island DXpedition 3-Y-0-Z. The team of hams is scheduled to leave later this
    month for the rare island, which is second on the DXCC most-wanted list.
    Other activities at the California weekend convention will feature talks
    by some of the world's most accomplished DXpeditioners, sharing their
    tips and their stories. To get more details visit their website
    dxconvention dot org (dxconvention.org).

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: An important part of that weekend's event is the
    Intrepid Spirit Award conferred by the Intrepid-DX Group. It is named in memory of Silent Key James McLaughlin WA2EWE/T6AF. James was among a
    number of Americans killed in April of 2011 after an Afghan military
    pilot opened fire. McLaughlin was working as a flight instructor in
    Kabul at the time of his death.

    Nominations for this year's award winner are being accepted through the
    15th of January. The award will be given on April 21st at the
    International DX Convention.

    Send nominations by email to intrepiddxgroup at gmail dot com (intrepiddxgroup@gmail.com).

    **

    CUBAN AMATEURS SCORE HIGH MARKS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The latest licensing exam in Cuba has produced plenty of
    new amateurs and quite a few impressive upgrades, as we hear from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: Radio amateurs in Cuba have proven themselves to be scholars. The
    FRC, the Cuban Radio Federation, reports that 98 percent of the
    candidates taking the licensing test on December 16th have passed. That
    means Cuba will have 103 newly licensed hams, gaining call signs with a
    CL prefix and 100 others qualified for upgrades to higher levels of
    licensing, with call sign prefixes of CM and CO.

    The FRC reports that this rate of success surpasses performance on the previous exam by 8 percent.

    The FRC announced that it was pleased with these latest test results and
    hopes the addition of new licensed amateurs will increase radio access
    to regions of Cuba that are mountainous and otherwise inaccessible. The
    FRC is also reaching out increasingly to youngsters and YLs.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    K2BSA ACTIVATION STARTS RADIO SCOUTS' NEW YEAR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The new year is only a few days old but already radio
    scouts have a busy agenda. We get those details from Bill Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL: This week in Radio Scouting we have one activation of the K2BSA callsign, the votes for officers are in at K2BSA, and we're looking at
    Radio Scouting Awards.

    Chris Clark, W6CBC, will be activating K2BSA/6 at Polar Camp in
    Idyllwild, CA, on Saturday January 13th. Polar Camp will include more
    than 250 Cub Scouts participating in winter activities. Chris will set
    up a Radio Scouting station where Scouts can learn how to include Ham
    Radios in all of their scouting adventures.

    The K2BSA organization had its biannual voting of officers this winter
    and the following will be the new leadership moving forward for a 2 year
    term as soon as the voting is approved: Jim Wilson, K5ND, will remain President, Bill Stearns, NE4RD, will become Vice President, Donald
    Sonnefeld, KD2FIL, will remain Secretary, and Mike Crownover, AD5A, will become Treasurer.

    Amateur Radio continues to be relevant in Scouting through awards that
    Scouts can earn in their various programs:

    Cub Scouts can use Amateur Radio for a component of their Arrow of
    Light, by communicating with a Scout in another country. This can be
    done at any time or during Jamboree on the Air.

    Girl Scouts can earn the Radio and Wireless Technology Patch. With this program and award, young women can learn about radio fundamentals,
    community service, and careers in radio.

    Boy Scouts can earn the Radio Merit Badge which teaches them about
    wireless technologies, Amateur Radio direction finding and modern
    methods of broadcast transmissions. In addition to the merit badge, Boy Scouts can earn the Morse Code Interpreter Strip by showing proficiency
    in CW by copying and sending a message at 5 words per minute. If a
    scout earns their amateur radio license, they can get an Amateur Radio Operator strip for their uniform as well. Amateur Radio Operators
    interested in helping scouts earn these awards, contact your local
    council, chapter, and district leadership.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **

    AUSTRALIAN AMATEURS PREP FOR 60th FIELD DAY

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In Australia, one amateur radio club is marking 60 years
    of being on the air by celebrating in a big way. For that story, we turn
    to Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Sunday February 25th, 2018 will see the 60th CCARC field
    day (Hamfest) at the Wyong horse racing course in New South Wales,
    Australia. The Central Coast ARC itself celebrated being 60 years old in
    2017 and now "the largest gathering of Radio Amateurs in the Southern Hemisphere" will hit its 60th edition in seven weeks' time.

    The racecourse is now owned by Racing New South Wales and a large high quality, air conditioned marquee will be available to house all of the commercial traders with the old under cover concourse area being
    available for flea market (car boot) sellers, so come rain or wind,
    visitors will be able to view goods undercover.

    As always there is a full and overflowing lecture program and attendance
    from the national society, the WIA and the QSL card bureau as well as
    other local radio clubs.

    The local "50-plus" radio station will be covering the event from an
    on-site installation.

    A big hit from last year, the drone flying demonstrations is being
    brought back and this year the drones, which will also be available for
    sale will be the "First Person View" type meaning the person flying the
    drone sees what the drone sees.

    The racecourse is conveniently located near to the main-line Wyong
    railway station and there is even a free courtesy bus from the station
    to the racecourse.

    For the 60 years young Central Coast Amateur Radio Club, this is Ed DD5LP.


    **
    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including
    W3BN, the 2-meter repeater of the Reading Radio Club in Reading,
    Pennsylvania on Friday evenings at 8 p.m. local time.

    **
    HAM GRANTED PATENT FOR "INVISIBILITY CLOAK"

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: It's no secret that hams are inventive. Paul Braun
    WD9GCO tells us about one ham in New England whose latest invention has
    won him yet another U.S. patent.

    PAUL: The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted a Massachusetts
    radio amateur a patent for an invisibility cloak that provides
    deflective electromagnetic shielding for ships, spacecraft, antennas, satellites, rockets, towers and other structures.

    Inventor Nathan Cohen W1YW, the founder of Fractal Antenna Systems Inc.
    issued a statement saying that while the company's previous patent
    covers an invisibility cloak itself, this technology can deflect electromagnetic waves, leaving an object invisible to those waves. The camouflage occurs at the level of heat and radio wavelengths. A press
    release from the company noted that the cloaking is possible even over a
    wide bandwidth. It can be used for defense and intelligence but also has commercial applications for towers and antennas.

    According to his QRZ profile, Nathan isn't just a fractal antenna
    specialist but an enthusiastic DXer.

    This is the latest patent to be granted to the firm.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (BUSINESS WIRE, QRZ)

    **
    MARKING ONE SHIP'S TRAGIC SINKING

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Special Event stations exist to remind us of important
    moments in world history. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us about one such
    station operating in Ireland to honor those who died aboard a torpedoed
    World War I ship.

    JEREMY: If you hear the callsign EI100MCV anytime between now and the
    end of the year, you are hearing a tribute to a World War I tragedy that
    is marking 100 years. More than 500 people died after the Royal Mail
    Ship Leinster was struck by a U-boat's torpedoes just off the Irish
    coast on the 10th of October in 1918. The ship's sinking 15 miles from Kingstown resulted in the most lives lost in the Irish sea. Many of
    those who were not killed immediately by the torpedoes died in the
    waters awaiting rescue. The Leinster was armed and its list of
    passengers included soldiers who were heading back to the war.

    The special station call sign contains the original call sign "MCV" from
    the ship. Amateur radio operators will be on all bands but are operating
    on or close to all amateur frequencies ending in the number 18. On 80
    meters that would include 3.518, 3.618 and 3.718 and on 160 meters that
    would include 1.918.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (IRTS, THE JOURNAL.IE)

    **
    SOUTH AFRICAN AMATEUR RADIO LEAGUE SEEKS AWARD NOMINEES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The South African Radio League is preparing for its
    convention in Pretoria and it's looking to honor deserving amateurs at
    the gathering this April in Pretoria. Here's more from John Williams
    VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: In preparation for its national convention in April the
    South African Radio League is accepting nominations for awards, as well
    as nominations for council positions and motions for discussion. The convention is being held on April 13th through 15th and is being hosted
    by the Pretoria Amateur Radio Club.

    All nominations are due by the 31st of January and should be sent to the secretary via the email address secretary at sarl dot org dot za (secretary@sarl.org.za.)

    SARL is also reminding its members that the new editions of its Blue
    Book and Diary of Events can be downloaded from the League's website at
    sarl dot org dot za (sarl.org.za). Since some contest rules have changed
    and a new VHF/UHF contest has been introduced, it's important to have
    the most up-to-date edition. The Diary of Events will contain full
    information about Summits on the Air, the Fauna and Flora program, SARL
    awards and IARU awards.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (SARL)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for the special call sign HH70A. The
    Radio Club of Haiti is operating with that call sign to celebrate its
    70th anniversary, which it is marking on March 29. Be listening on all
    bands. Send QSLs via W3HNK.

    Adrian EA1CYK is using the call sign OD5/EA1CYK while in Lebanon as a
    member of the Spanish UNIFIL contingent. He will be there until May. His
    QSL Manager is EA7LS.

    Be listening for Pat N2IEN operating as A52PD from Bhutan from the
    second to the fourteenth of January. QSLs go via NR6M.

    Jim, WB2TJO, is active as 3D2JS from Fiji through mid-March. Listen for
    Jim on 40-15 meters using CW, SSB and digital modes. Send QSLs via his
    home callsign.

    Alex UA1OJL is on King George Island in the South Shetland Islands where
    he is active as RI1ANO until the 31st of March. Listen for him using the special callsign RI50ANO to celebrate the 50th anniversary of
    Bellingshausen Base where he is stationed. QSL Manager is RN1ON via Club
    Log OQRS.

    (OHIO-PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: OUR AULD LANG SYNE-OFF

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Finally, should old acquaintances be forgot? Not in
    amateur radio, where eyeball QSOs and on-air contacts always keep us connected. So as we begin 2018, let's consider some of the top stories
    we connected you with during the past year. Here's Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    DON: What a year: Dayton Hamvention made its debut in a new location in
    Xenia, Ohio. Pilot Brian Lloyd WB6RQN circled the globe calling QRZ in a tribute to Amelia Earhart. TV's "Last Man Standing" aired its final
    sitcom episode about a ham radio family. A bankrupt Radio Shack closed
    more than a thousand stores in the U.S. In the UK, Radio Caroline, the
    former pirate broadcaster, went legit and got licensed. Radio Australia
    ended its shortwave service. In the U.S., the Amateur Radio Parity Act
    of 2017 was introduced on Capitol Hill where it remains stalled. Hams responded to three major storms during Atlantic hurricane season as well
    as earthquakes and wildfires around the world. Hams also tracked the
    first total solar eclipse in more than three decades. Where will 2018
    take us? Keep listening - and we'll explore that answer together.
    Meanwhile, we wish you, our listeners, a Happy New Year.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; Business Wire; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the IARU; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; the Intrepid DX Group; the Journal; K2BSA;
    Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; South African Radio League; Southgate
    Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, January 12, 2018 18:33:20
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2098 for Friday, January 12, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2098 with a release date of Friday, January 12 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Participants in the World Radiosport Team
    Championship in Germany are gearing up. Ham Radio University gives
    amateurs refresher courses in New York -- and the ham community grieves
    the sudden tragic loss of a noted DXer. All this and more as Amateur
    Radio Newsline Report 2098 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    SILENT KEY: DEATH OF A DXer

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast on a somber note. Following a tragedy not far from his home in Maryland, a beloved radio amateur has
    become a Silent Key. Mike Askins KE5CXP has more.

    MIKE: A tragic accident has claimed the life of a well-liked and
    respected amateur who was an accomplished DXpeditioner and an Elmer to
    so many young people. David Collingham, K3LP, became a Silent Key on
    Jan. 6. He died after falling through the ice during an attempt a day
    earlier to rescue his dog from a frozen pond in Frederick County, Maryland.

    President of the Intrepid DX Group, David had participated in more than
    70 DXpeditions. He visited more than 100 different DXCC entities,
    operating from 62 of them. In 2014, the CQDX Hall of Fame added his name
    to its roster. David's accomplishments included activating 8 of the Top
    10 Most Wanted DXCC Entities and 16 of the Top 50. He was also a member
    of the ARRL, Potomac Valley Radio Club, the National Capital DX
    Association and the Southwest Ohio DX Association.

    His many friends, including James Nitzberg WX3B recall David's
    unwavering love of children and the care in which he encouraged them to
    grow in the hobby. When David would visit a rare DX location, James
    said, it was not unusual for him to leave behind radios and antennas for
    the kids or the amateur clubs to use as their own.

    David Collingham was 59. We here at Newsline send our deepest
    condolences to his wife Rebecca and the rest of his family.

    Announcing his death, Paul Ewing N6PSE, his friend and coleader on the
    2016 VP8STI/VP8SGI South Sandwich and South Georgia Islands Dxpedition,
    wrote: [quote] “He will always be a hero in our hearts.”

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    **

    ARRL FACING CHALLENGES OVER POLICIES, CODES, LOBBYING

    NEIL/ANCHOR: As the ARRL prepares for its next board meeting later this
    month it is facing some grassroots challenges, as we hear from Paul
    Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: The ARRL is facing some major public challenges from the U.S.
    amateur community regarding its actions, bylaws and policies. A group
    known as myARRLvoice is advocating change in the ARRL Code of Conduct
    and lobbying efforts as well through its steering committee that
    comprises some of the ARRL's own past vice directors, Life Members and
    Maxim Society members.

    The group launched a website on Monday, Jan. 8, urging them to press the
    ARRL for more transparency at its next board meeting on Jan. 19.

    ARRL leadership first became embattled in an escalating war of words
    with a vocal coalition in California over the league's Code of Conduct.
    The Northern California Contest Club, an ARRL affiliate, claimed the
    Code stifled communications in league matters and prompted the
    controversial public censure of a division director in November.

    The ARRL will not publicly discuss the specifics of the censure.
    However, its leadership continues to stand by the Code as well as its
    more recent actions. On Jan. 6, ARRL Hudson Division Director Mike
    Lisenco N2YBB addressed that issue in very general terms when he gave a keynote speech at Ham Radio University on Long Island, New York.

    Calling the censure a personnel matter not open to public by the ARRL he nonetheless reaffirmed both the need for the Code and the content of the
    Code and supported the ARRL's actions.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.


    **
    TWO FOR THE ROAD AT WRTC 2018

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The World Radiosport Team Championship is coming up July
    12th through 16th near Wittenberg, Germany. The teams have been
    selected, and the competitors are well on their way of training for this
    event held only every four years, just like the Olympics. You’ll be
    hearing more about WRTC as the months go by, and our own Ed Durrant,
    DD5LP will be on site bringing you the latest news from the biggest
    radiosport event in the world. The event features the best of the best.
    And, this year there are three youth teams added to the field. One of
    the teams is a pair from the Americas – 22 year old Mathias Acevedo,
    CE2MVF, who had the highest qualifying point total of the under 25
    selections from La Calera, Chile, and his chosen partner 13 year old
    Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO from Montgomery, Alabama. These two are preparing
    the best they can, with some help of some very experienced contesters.

    MATHIAS: Well, in my case for this new challenge, the WRTC 2018…
    Roberto, CE3CT and Dale, VE7SV are helping me along the way. They are
    both serious contesters, and VE7 has participated in WRTC 2014.

    NEIL: Going up against 60 other teams consisting of the top contesters
    from all over the planet is a daunting task. But Bryant thinks it will
    be an experience of a lifetime.

    BRYANT: If you look up the word “underdog” in the dictionary, you’d see
    our picture. I’ve only been a ham two and a half years. We live 5,000
    miles apart, and we can’t do a mock run. And all of our interaction is
    via WhatsApp and on the phone. So we are definitely disadvantaged. But,
    I know we have a full tank of enthusiasm. And, I will say that we are
    very excited to be competing, and I know with hard work despite all
    these disadvantages, we will be in a huge learning experience.

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Good luck to these two and all the other competitors.

    **
    "DIPLOMAS" FOR VOLUNTEERS AT WRTC 2018

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Organizers of the championship are meanwhile finding ways
    to thank the volunteer supporters whose efforts form the backbone of the event. Ed Durrant DD5LP has more on that.

    ED'S REPORT: What would the World Radio Team Championship be without the volunteers? It simply wouldn't happen.

    In order to acknowledge the support provided by the volunteers, the WRTC organizers are issuing the "VOTA diploma" for those helping with WRTC 2018.

    VOTA stands for Volunteers On The Air and is intended to underline the
    fact that the work of the volunteers is central to the success of WRTC
    2018 in July in Wittenberg, Germany.
    Each volunteer is assigned a WRTC VOTA number which they can give out on
    air for the whole of 2018.

    Stations working the volunteer stations can apply for the VOTA-Award at
    25, 45, and 65 contact levels (classes 3,2 and 1 respectively) as well
    as Gold and Platinum awards for those working 100 or 200 volunteers.

    To launch the activity and award a special one hour "activity period"
    will take place between 0800 to 0900 UTC on the 80 metre band on Sunday
    the 14th. of January when the volunteers will be calling "CQ VOTA" and
    looking for contacts.

    Full details are on the DARC website at the link shown in the show notes.

    http://dcl.darc.de/~dcl/public/diplom_details.php?diplomid◄5

    For ARNewsline from Germany, this is Ed Durrant DD5LP and WRTC 2018 VOTA number DL-012.

    **
    HAM RADIO UNIVERSITY CLASSES IN SESSION

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There were no diplomas but a whole lot of education was
    going on nonetheless at a recent program in New York called Ham Radio University. Jim Damron N8TMW has those details.

    JIM'S REPORT: A $5 donation became the ticket to a full day of amateur
    radio workshops - everything from the basics of propagation to the
    nuances of successful contesting - as Ham Radio University opened its
    doors on Saturday, January 6. The annual New York event featured 30
    forums and a variety of hands-on workshops as well as special event
    station WHRU. Just like Dayton Hamvention, Ham Radio University was
    trying out a new venue - the C.W. Post campus of Long Island University
    in Brookville, New York. Despite the so-called "ice cyclone" that
    blasted the northeast only days earlier, the turnout drew attendance
    from around the region with an estimated attendance of about 300.
    Everything from scanning, SDR and satellites to digital modes and Dxing
    got full coverage. New forums were introduced for YLs, DMR and D-Star. Planning is already underway for another full day of Elmering and
    fellowship on Saturday, January 5, 2019.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    **

    BREAK HERE


    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    K8SCH repeater on Wednesdays at 9 p.m. local time in Cincinnati, Ohio,
    during the TechTalk Net.

    **
    COOPERATION AND CONSOLIDATION IN CANADA

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There's a new partnership starting up between Radio
    Amateurs of Canada and the amateur organization in Quebec. Geri Goodrich KF5KRN has more details.

    GERI: With the start of the new year, two amateur radio organizations in Canada are cooperating more closely with one another on amateur
    education and a QSL bureau. As of Jan. 1, Radio Amateurs of Canada and
    RAQI in Quebec have agreed to share resources for bureaus. The RAC's
    Outgoing QSL Bureau is to become Canada's sole outgoing bureau for QSL
    cards. RAQI's outgoing bureau will now serve as a branch of the larger
    RAC bureau.
    The organizations said the move makes particularly good sense with fewer
    QSL cards being sent and with postal rates rising.
    RAC has also agreed to promote RAQI's online amateur radio course to
    those outside the province of Quebec. According to the RAC this will
    provide an alternate form of instruction available to Canadians who are
    unable to receive instruction at their own local ham radio clubs. A
    portion of the registration fees paid by registrants outside Quebec will
    be given to the RAC.
    This agreement was worked out last year between the two organizations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **
    WHY K3Y KEEPS THE CODE COMING

    NEIL/ANCHOR: If you couldn't get enough of Code on Straight Key Night,
    Skeeter Nash N5ASH has another option that's available for you right now.

    SKEETER: The Straight Key Century Club knows how to keep a good party
    going: It was founded in 2006 after the ARRL's annual Straight Key
    Night. They simply didn't want the party to end. Now, it seems, they
    have another reason to continue that festive feeling: the club is
    marking 12 years and more than 18 thousand members. So the club is
    inviting hams everywhere to come and work its Special Event Station K3Y.
    The club has stations operating in the U.S. and around the world,
    including Europe, South America and Africa -- 19 areas in total. Working
    all 19 locations gives you 500 bonus points.

    Here's another reason to go for those points: If all the call signs you
    work have enough letters to spell out "Happy Twelfth Anniversary SKCC"
    give yourself an extra 100 points for each of the words you have managed
    to complete. Dust off your straight key and visit K3Y's QRZ page for
    more details. To obtain a special spreadsheet for scoring, email Jerry
    K6III at Jerry dot Bliss at gmail dot com (jerry.bliss@gmail.com).

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.

    (CURT WA2JSG)

    **
    HAMVENTION PICKS COMMUNITY SERVICE THEME

    NEIL/ANCHOR: No, it's not May yet but Hamvention 2018 planners aren't
    waiting until the last minute to pick this year's theme. It's "Amateur
    Radio, Serving the Community" and according to event chairman Ron Cramer KD8ENJ, it's a nod to all the hard work hams have done locally in the
    past year, especially in times of emergency. There will be forums
    devoted specifically to emergency communications and hams can get a
    closer look at vehicles used during such emergencies. Remember
    Hamvention is being held May 18th through 20th in Xenia, Ohio at the
    Greene County Fairgrounds and Expo Center.

    (HENRY RUMINSKI W8HJR)

    **
    FRIENDSHIP AND FOCUS IN THE PHILIPPINES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Girl Scouts in the Philippines are getting ready for some
    DXing that's designed to build bridges of friendship. Here's Jim Meachen ZL2BHF with more.

    JIM MEACHEN'S REPORT: For five hours on Saturday, Feb. 17, Girl Scouts
    in the Philippines will be in search of good friends and even better
    scores on the air during the 2018 International Friendship Exchange and
    DX Contest. Girl Scouts at the Senior and Cadet levels will be assisted
    by amateur radio stations affiliated with the Philippine Amateur Radio Association. Stations may apply for special call signs from the National Telecommunications Commission after getting approval from the Philippine
    radio group. Stations will have both low power and high power operations
    and will be on 40, 20 and 15 meters using phone only. Although this is a contest, its greater purpose is to foster friendships internationally
    and to show the girls the important role radio communications can have
    if needed in a disaster.

    The event is run by the Philippine Amateur Radio Association and "GSP
    SHARES," also known as the Girl Scouts of the Philippines Scouts Ham
    Radio Enthusiasts for Service. Participants need to register no later
    than February 1st. For more details, visit the website para dot org. (para.org)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (PARA)

    **
    'SERGIO AND SERGEI' IS A HIT

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Who doesn't love a good film in which amateur radio has a starring role? Apprently even the audiences in Cuba love this one, as we
    hear from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: Take a stranded Russian cosmonaut in a space station and add a
    Cuban amateur radio operator into the mix and you've got a winning
    combination for a feature film. That's what the Cuban amateur radio federation, the FRC, has to say about "Sergio and Sergei." The film,
    directed by Ernesto Daranas, has been voted most popular by moviegoers
    in Cuba.

    The fictional account of the men's friendship that develops while the cosmonaut is stranded during the Soviet collapse in 1991, is loosely
    based on actual contacts between amateur radio operators in Cuba and the
    Mir space station.

    The U.S.-Cuba collaboration, which also features Ron Pearlman as an
    American journalist, was recently screened at the 39th International
    Festival of New Latin American Cinema in Havana. It mae its premiere in September at the Toronto Film Festival.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (The CUBAN AMATEUR RADIO FEDERATION)

    **

    WORLD OF DX


    In the world of DX, listen for the FGC Radio Team from Eritrea between
    the 14th and 23rd of January. Zorro, JH1AJT, Franz/DJ9ZB, Dima/RA9USU, Yan/RZ3FW and Champ/E21EIC will be operating on CW, SSB and RTTY on 160
    meters through 6 meters. The trip is designed to support the Eritrea
    National Olympic Committee. Send QSLs via JH1AJT. Contacts will be
    entered into OQRS on ClubLog when he returns to Japan.

    Listen for John KB4FB operating holiday style from Laos. He began there
    on January 9th and expects to stay for about two weeks. He is using the
    call sign XW4FB. QSLs will be via LoTW.

    A group of Japanese amateurs is using the call sign 6Y6J from the
    Jamaica home station of Josh 6Y5WJ through the 22nd of January. QSLs can
    be sent through Club Log's OQRS. All logs will also be uploaded to LoTW.

    Listen until the 31st of January for Rich PA0RRS. Rich is operating from Penang Island, West Malaysia using his 9M2MRS callsign. QSLs can go to
    his home call sign.

    (IRTS, OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: THE SKY'S NOT FALLING BUT.....

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We close out this week's newscast with a report about a
    contest that, for a change, doesn't involve being on the air. Here's
    John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN: If you're a distant relative of Chicken Little, the odds are that
    this contest may not be right for you. But if your guessing game is good
    - and you don't run around shouting every 10 minutes that the sky is
    falling - you might have a chance at a nice prize in what's being called
    the Chicken Little Contest. No, the sky isn't falling but a Chinese
    space laboratory weighing nine tons is definitely set for a
    less-than-glorious return home. It's called the Tiangong-1 spacecraft.
    It's the first space lab built and launched by China. It went up in
    September 2011 and now, well, it's poised to come back down sometime in mid-March. The word "sometime" is the key here. The Aerospace
    Corporation's Center for Orbital and Re-entry Debris Studies is
    sponsoring a contest, asking people to guess as best as they can when
    the lab will land. The center will provide a prize, which it hasn't yet disclosed. Don't worry, the laboratory has no crew aboard. The only
    thing riding on it now are people's hopes their guess was the best of all.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (SPACE.COM)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; the
    Cuban Amateur Radio Federation; Curt WA2JSG; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; Henry Ruminski W8HJR; the IARU; the Irish Radio Transmitters
    Society; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Philippine Amateur Radio Association;
    QRZ; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Space.com; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our
    listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 02, 2018 10:00:48
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2101 for Friday, February 2, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2101 with a release date of Friday, February 2, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Delays plague the planned construction of Dayton Hamvention's new expo center. Arizona's Quartzfest has concluded and
    reports record attendance -- and a new award bears the name of a recent
    Silent Key who was an accomplished DXer and treasured friend. All this
    and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2101 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART


    **
    DELAYS PLAGUE HAMVENTION EXPO CENTER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We open this week's newscast with an update on this year's
    Dayton Hamvention and some disappointing news. Here's Stephen Kinford,
    N8WB with that report.

    STEPHEN: Hamvention 2018 is going forward on the weekend of May 18th to
    20th, as planned, but the massive international gathering of ham radio operators will not have the much-anticipated new expo center that was announced last year. Hamvention organizers report a backlog on the prefabricated building sections, causing a construction delay not just
    for Hamvention but the Greene County Fair. The announcement was made on
    Jan. 29 by Hamvention organizers Ron Cramer KD8ENJ, Jack Gerbs WB8SCT
    and Michael Kalter W8CI. They said it was regrettable but [quote] "It is
    well out of our control." [endquote]

    A Jan. 29 report in the Dayton Daily News said bidding for the $1.9
    million expo center closed with one bidder, Greater Dayton Construction
    Ltd., citing higher costs than the county had estimated. County
    Administrator Brandon Huddleson told the newspaper that the company was
    not able to guarantee the building's opening in time for Hamvention at
    the Greene County fairgrounds. The county's plan now, he said, is to
    rebid the project again in the summer to ensure the building would be in
    place later this year.

    Ron Cramer reaffirmed Hamvention's commitment to the fairgrounds,
    however. Organizers noted that an additional building will be available
    this year - a 7,500-square-foot structure being vacated by Fairgrounds Furniture, which has until April to leave the premises.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth, Ohio.

    (DAYTON DAILY NEWS, DAYTON HAMVENTION)


    **

    ARIZONA'S QUARTZFEST BREAKS RECORDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Arizona, another much-celebrated gathering of amateurs,
    has just concluded and as we hear from James Pastorfield KB7TBT, it was
    quite a finish.

    JAMES: Quartzfest 2018 is now in the history books -- and what a year we
    had. The all-time attendance record was not only broken but it was
    smashed with 853 people. The previous record, set in 2016, was 820.

    There were 118 activities on the schedule ranging from antenna building, Winlink, A Ladies Circle, Rasberry Pi, a four-by-four off-road trail
    ride and even a Pet Parade. At night, lots of people would gather around
    one of the RVs where they had a movie night. The WIN-System group was in charge of making the coffee during the event and we all were thankful
    for that on the chilly mornings. The WIN-System group even had a 440 MHz repeater linked into the network all week long. Many people checked in
    and got on the air to talk to people all over the U.S. and around the
    world via VoIP.

    On Tuesday afternoon the Western Country Cousins put on a Pot Luck
    dinner that had lots of side dishes and 40 pounds of brisket.

    The Laurel Amateur Radio Club on Wednesday and the ARRL on Saturday held
    VE sessions that together passed nine new Technicians, 7 Generals and 5
    Extra class operators. During Happy Hour we gathered all the new
    technicians to make their first VHF 2 meter contact with Gordon West
    WB6NOA and receive a First Contact Certificate.

    Every morning and night we all gathered around the campfire for a
    fireside chat, on Wednesday night we had the Burning Ham-Man activity.

    On Thursday Rick-W7RAP held the annual Hobo Stew and again we all had
    full bellies by nightfall.

    On Thursday night we had a Hootenanny at the fire circle and enjoyed
    lots of great music that was put on by Russell-KB6YAF, Michele-K7MGO,
    and Kevin-NB7O.

    The Salome High School did a project with the kids to build QRP Fox Hunt transmitters, we had tiny spiders, dinosaurs and even a flower in a pot
    to hide in a garden. The projects were used for the Fox Hunting
    activities during the week.

    The W7Q Special event station was on the air all week long and made 244 contacts with James-KB7TBT - that would be me! - winning the most
    contacts award at 125.

    Kristyn Weed-KR1SS has been coordinating the event for six years now,
    she worked endlessly to make the event one of the best ever, we all
    thank her for the spectacular job that she has done.

    We also give out a special thank-you to all the volunteers who took care
    of us.

    We hope to see you all again January 20-26, 2019.

    Reporting from Quartzfest 2018, this is James Pastorfield-KB7TBT, 73
    till next year!

    **
    NEW SATELLITE READY FOR ACTION

    PAUL/ANCHOR: There's one more satellite out there ready for amateur use
    and Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN: Now this is the kind of grand opening that satellite enthusiasts
    can't resist: the Fox 1D satellite, AO-92, is available for amateur
    radio operations. The satellite had been launched on January 12th from
    India and underwent vigorous testing by AMSAT Engineering and Operations
    teams before making its debut. The announcement of its availability by
    Drew Glasbrenner KO4MA, AMSAT vice president of general operations, came
    after word that the satellite had been commissioned and turned over to
    AMSAT.

    Updates on the satellite's schedule will be available via AMSAT's
    Twitter account, at AMSAT (@AMSAT) and will also appear on AMSAT's North America Facebook grou page and in the AMSAT News Service Weekly
    Bulletins. The operation is being shared among the U/v FM transponder,
    L-Band Downshifter, Virginia Tech Camera and the University of Iowa's
    High Energy Radiation CubeSat Instrument.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (ARRL, AMSAT)

    **

    HUMANITARIAN AWARD NAMED FOR RECENT SILENT KEY

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Just weeks after he became a Silent Key, the name of one
    ham will live on in a special honor as we learn from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE: Only recently we shared the news of the tragic death of noted DXer
    and Elmer to many, David Collingham, K3LP. To honor his memory, there is
    now an award that bears his name. The K3LP Humanitarian and Service
    Award has been introduced by the Intrepid-DX Group honoring the group's cofounder and president who became a Silent Key in early January while attempting to rescue his dog from a frozen pond.

    The first such award will be given in April when the DX group holds its international convention in Visalia, California. The nomination period
    closed on the 31st of January and we await word on who will be the first recipient. The award is to be presented to the amateur or amateur group
    that has accomplished some enduring humanitarian work or service during
    2017.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (INTREPID DX GROUP)

    **
    NONSTOP RADIO, NONSTOP COFFEE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: If you've ever wondered what a radio marathon is like, this report from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT might give you an idea.

    CARYN: Among the few things that are good any time of the day or night,
    we can include coffee and, of course, ham radio. Who would know that
    better than an international gathering of hams who've been meeting on
    EchoLink twice a day for the past eight years?
    They call themselves Our Coffee Shop. On Saturday February 10th they're marking eight years of friendship with 24 hours of radio. Richard Bascom KB4SVP said the round-the-clock marathon is the group's way to celebrate
    and invite the world to join in. It's not a Net. It's not a Special
    Event station. It's a gathering of friends on a conference server from
    the UK to the US and beyond. The EchoLink software has the group listed
    under KB4SVP, node number 370143.
    Join them February 10th. Bring your thoughts, bring your good wishes,
    bring your ideas and, oh yes, bring your own coffee.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    (RICHARD BASCOM KB4SVP)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    W2GLD repeater in Pinckney, Michigan on Saturdays at 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

    **

    RECOGNIZING THE YOUNGEST 'HELPING HAMS'

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Hams are known for being helpful to others in their amateur pursuits but when they start young, it's worth recognizing that giving
    spirit. Neil Rapp WB9VPG tells us about an awards program just for them.

    NEIL: It’s time once again for nominations for the "Young Ham Lends a
    Hand" award. Carole Perry, WB2MGP will be collecting nominations to
    recognize a young licensed person, 19 years of age or younger, who has
    gone above and beyond to help others. Perhaps it’s assistance with an
    antenna installation, demonstrating ham radio to others, or volunteering
    with emergency communications. The winner will receive the award from
    Radio Club of America Youth Activities at the Dayton Hamvention Youth
    Forum and a $100 stipend donated by the Quarter Century Wireless
    Association for his or her good deeds. The Young Ham Lends a Hand award
    was first presented in 2012 to Mikaila Williams, K4IDS, who was 8 years
    old at the time. She was involved with helping an elderly citizen in her community. Last year’s winner was Ryan Cutshall, KD9DAB, who helped a
    blind ham operate Field Day, managed contesting efforts at Bloomington
    High School South, and taught ham radio to 4th graders at an elementary school. If you know a young person who is deserving of such an award,
    send your nomination to Carole at wb2mgp@gmail.com by April 1st.
    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.


    **
    REQUEST FOR AUSTRALIAN HAMS TO BE GRANTED MORE POWER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Communications officials in Australia are being asked to
    consider some changes you might call powerful changes. Robert Broomhead
    VK3DN brings us that story.

    ROBERT: The phrase "more power to the hams in Australia" isn't just a
    rallying cry or a way to drum up spirit. It's a real push that the
    Wireless Institute of Australia has taken on, asking the nation's
    regulator, the Australian Communications and Media Authority, to allow
    greater power levels for each of the three license classes.

    The WIA is asking for the Foundation license to be granted 50-watt
    operation; the Standard license to be given 200 watts and they are
    seeking 1500 watts for the Advanced License.

    The WIA had conducted several surveys during the last yaer and based its recommendations on the responses from the amateur community.

    The Foundation license is presently granted no more than 10 watts SSB,
    the Standard license, 100 watts on SSB and the Advanced License cannot
    exceed 400 watts on SSB.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    (SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO)

    **

    NEW ZEALAND RADIO OPERATORS TRY OUT 60 METERS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In New Zealand it's time to take 60 meters for a test drive
    and amateur radio operators can't wait. Here's Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM: Sixty meters may well be on its way for New Zealand's amateurs. The
    New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters reports that its
    negotiations with the New Zealand Defense Force and the government's
    Radio Spectrum Management have resulted in approval for one year's trial
    usage for single sideband on 5 MHz. Authorized usage will be low power
    and on a secondary basis only. Before going on the air, hams will need
    to submit a completed form to NZART after downloading and completing it.
    The form establishes a sub-license for band usage.

    The trial period will be used to determine whether 60 meter
    transmissions are feasible for amateurs without interfering with primary users.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **
    WIA SEEKING VOLUNTEER QSL MANAGER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: If you like receiving and sending QSL cards and you live in Australia, John Williams VK4JJW tells us about an opportunity in the
    Northern Territory there.

    JOHN: Now here's an opportunity to work with QSL cards that may inspire someone to...well.....QSL. There's an available position for Northern Territory Inwards QSL Manager - that would be VK8 - and the Wireless
    Institute of Australia is hoping for a well-organized volunteer who can
    sort incoming cards as well as send sorted cards to radio clubs and
    amateurs in the Territory. The position also requires record-keeping for
    the cards distributed on a yearly basis and contributing input into the
    WIA annual report on bureau operations.

    Applicants should belong to the QSL Card Committee and preferably be a resident of the Northern Territory. Training, if it's needed, is
    available and hours are very flexible.

    To express your interest, visit the WIA website and search for Northern Territory Inwards QSL Manager.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (WIA)


    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, you have only a few days left to contact Dutch
    operators Johannes PA5X and Gerben PG5M. They are operating as C8X and
    C81G respectively from Ibo Island off the coast of Mozambique. The
    contact counts as AF-061 for the Islands on the Air Award. They will be
    on CW, SSB and FT8 on 80 – 10m. QSL via Club Log OQRS.

    Ofcom has issued the special event callsign GB8OEGGCN to commemorate the
    80th anniversary of the launch of HMS Belfast. Be listening for the
    RNARS London Group operating it from the 1st of March until the 31st of
    May. The callsign signifies "GGCN" which was the maritime callsign of
    the HMS Belfast, launched in March of 1938. For QSL information, visit
    the QRZ page of G-Zero-TOC. (G0TOC)

    Arnaud, JG1XMV will be operating as FK/JG1XMV from New Caledonia
    starting February 17th. He will operate from a number of islands in the
    IOTA reference group. Arnaud will be operating holidays style on 40, 20,
    17 and 15 meters using SSB. QSL via his home callsign, direct, LoTW or
    eQSL.

    Finally, in case you missed a chance to contact any of the WRTC
    volunteers who were on the air on the 14th of January, you're getting a
    second and even a third and fourth chance - if not more. From now until
    the WRTC in July, volunteers will be on the air and making contacts
    Fridays from 1700 to 1800 UTC. So if you are collecting VOTA numbers for
    the VOTA awards, listen out for stations calling "CQ VOTA" across
    whichever HF bands are open.

    (ED DURRANT DD5LP, IRTS)

    ***
    KICKER: ASHES TO ASHES, STARDUST TO STARDUST

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, before we say goodbye to our listeners this week,
    here's a story about a somewhat more unconventional goodbye - one that involves a launch pad. With that story is Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    DON'S REPORT: If the old Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young song lyrics are
    true and we all are, in fact, stardust, it was only a matter of time
    before funerals in space came along. A company called Elysium Space,
    which bills itself as a memorial spaceflight business, has plans to
    begin sending ashes into space on rideshare missions. It expects it
    first launch to be aboard one of the SpaceX rockets of Elon Musk.

    The concept isn't totally new. "Star Trek" fans will recall that James
    Doohan, who portrayed Enterprise chief engineer Scotty, had his ashes
    sent into orbit in 2012 aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

    But for common folks the ritual hasn't been quite so common. Elysium
    Space executives hope to change that and claims there are already 100
    such reservations for its inaugural mission, the Elysium Star II. It is apparently popular with aerospace fans and military veterans.
    Reservations for the one-way trip start at $2,490.

    The Elysium website itself offers a glimpse into its vision for lunar
    and orbital memorials that have come of age. No longer do aging space enthusiasts have to wish upon a star.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW

    (NEWSWEEK, ELYSIUM SPACE)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; AMSAT; the ARRL; CQ Magazine;
    Dayton Daily News; Dayton Hamvention; Elysium Space; Hap Holly and the
    Rain Report; Intrepid DX Group; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society;
    New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Newsweek; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Richard Bascom KB4SVP; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted
    Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 09, 2018 09:15:44
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2102 for February 9, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2102 with a release date of Friday, February 9 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The Bouvet Island DXpedition is scrapped. School
    Club Roundup gears up in the U.S. - and in Australia, an amateur TV
    repeater is on the move. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline
    Report 2102 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    TOP STORY: BOUVET ISLAND DXPEDITION SCRAPPED

    JIM/ANCHOR: Our top story this week is the Bouvet Island DXpedition
    3Y0Z, a journey that turned out to be different from the one so
    long-awaited by the amateur radio community. After experiencing problems
    with the weather and one of the ship's engines, the team reluctantly
    aborted their mission on Saturday the 3rd of February for safety reasons
    - even with Bouvet itself clearly in view. As they reversed course,
    ocean conditions diverted their planned return to Chile and the ship was rerouted to Cape Town, South Africa where the radio operators plan to
    catch flights home. In the meantime, they are safe and have been
    operating maritime mobile as time permits using CW and FT-8 with their 100-watt rigs said their lead pilot, Valerie Hotzfeld, NV9L. The team is
    also making plans to ship the radio equipment back home.
    Val said their estimated arrival on U.S. soil should be sometime around
    the 15th and 16th of this month. The saga of what is easily one of the
    most expensive DXpeditions ever is not over yet. Plans are being worked
    on to try again.

    (VALERIE HOTZFELD, NV9L)

    **
    FIRST-TIMERS ENTER SCHOOL CLUB ROUNDUP

    JIM/ANCHOR: The chase to contact school ham radio clubs is on again and
    this time there's a brand new club in the contest. Neil Rapp WB9VPG has
    more.

    NEIL'S REPORT: It’s time once again for School Club Roundup! Twice each
    year, school clubs from elementary through college get on the air for a
    week to make as many contacts as possible. The event takes place Monday, February 12th through Friday, February 17th. The exchange is RS(T),
    class (individual, club, or school) and state, province, or country. So
    get on the air and give these budding students someone to contact. They
    will be on all bands and modes but there are suggested frequencies on
    each band. That’s where you will find most of the schools. At least one
    of those school clubs is so new that it's getting on the air for the
    first time during the Roundup! Ben Piecora, K2CPU, a 15-year-old student
    at West Islip High School in New York, worked School Club Roundup
    stations from home in the past and decided to get permission to add his school, complete with a vanity callsign W2WIH, to those participating.

    BEN: Originally, the whole story of the starting this club is... I got
    my license and he got his license, and we met at the VE session. And
    then towards the the end of the year, I jokingly suggested that we start
    a radio club. He was like, "That's actually a cool idea." So, this
    September we started going through with it, and requested the callsign
    and got the vanity callsign, and all that stuff... and set up the
    logbooks. So, we are all ready to go with the contesting software.

    NEIL: Ben explains that they are starting with a temporary setup to get
    the ball rolling.

    BEN: My teacher, KD2FKP... he just bought his 7300 for his home
    station. So we're just going to use that. We're planning on setting up
    a 40 and 20 meter dipole up about 30 feethoping to make some contacts.

    NEIL: The event is sponsored by the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio
    Club and ARRL. Look for hashtag arrlscr on Twitter, and for complete
    rules visit ARRL.org/school-club-roundup. For Amateur Radio Newsline,
    I’m Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, hoping to hear YOU on the air from K9SOU.

    **
    ALABAMA OLD-TIMERS GET THEIR BIG NIGHT

    JIM/ANCHOR: On the opposite end of the ham radio timeline are the
    old-timers - and they had their big night recently in Huntsville,
    Alabama. Here's Paul Braun WD9GCO with more.

    PAUL'S REPORT: You don't need to rely on DMR and digital modes to
    generate excitement in amateur radio. Sometimes even the newest hams
    enjoy a trip back to radio's roots. The February 2nd meeting of the
    Huntsville Amateur Radio Club in Huntsville, Alabama turned back the
    clock and turned over the proceedings to veteran hams for "Old Timers'
    Night." Leading the road back was club vice president M.D. Smith WA4DXP,
    who emcee'd the parade of memories back to the 1960s and beyond. One ham
    told how he had turned an old AM radio receiver into a low-power AM transmitter which used a record player as its input. M.D. himself
    recalled the first electronic keyer he built in 1962, the year he got
    his license. These are the kinds of tales older hams are famous for, of course, but the audience included a good many enthusiastic young Tech
    tickets. The response was a mix of amazement and perhaps inspiration as
    many told the storytellers: Gee whiz, I can't believe you did all that
    with so little stuff!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (HUNTSVILLE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB)

    **

    AMATEURS PREPARE TO MARK ALABAMA'S BICENTENNIAL

    JIM/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, Alabama hams everywhere are poised to celebrate.
    What's the big deal? Stephen Kinford N8WB tells us.

    STEPHEN: Fresh from celebrating its 198th birthday on December 14th, the
    State of Alabama is ready to party, ham-radio style. It's a big blowout
    that will continue for the next two years until the state's bicentennial
    year. The Alabama Bicentennial Amateur Radio Club AL2C marked the
    occasion late last year with Gov. Kay Ivey and control operator Otto
    Arnoscht N4UZZ but that on-air moment is hardly the end of it. Special
    event stations will be operating throughout the state in the months
    ahead, beginning with a station at the BirmingHamFest on March 2nd and
    3rd on HF and possibly D-Star on REF058B. Any special event operations
    that happen subsequently on DMR can be found on Brandmeister TG-3101
    Alabama.

    You can keep track of happenings on the club's Facebook Page or on the
    website al2c dot org (al2c.org) or QRZ. Send QSLs via Logbook of the
    World. Hams wanting a certificate can download and print one out at the
    club website.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (Grady L. Evans W4GLE)

    **
    IN THE UK, SOTA ENTHUSIAST REACHES NEW PEAK

    JIM/ANCHOR: Hams in the Summits on the Air program always set their
    sights on new peaks - and one ham in the UK just reached a new one, as
    we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: There's nothing like having a cooperative spouse if you're going
    to achieve great heights in amateur radio. For one UK amateur active in
    the Summits on the Air program, it proved invaluable to his achieving
    the honor of Mountain Goat status. On his latest SOTA expedition, Simon Melhuish G4TJC reached the qualifying 1,000 points as an activator,
    earning him that honor. The Derbyshire amateur was operating in the
    company of his friend Allan Jones GW4VPX, himself a Mountain Goat. To
    achieve his goal, Simon had to collect four distinct QSOs from a summit
    in the Arenig range of Snowdonia. His friend Allan wasn't his only inspiration, however. That all-important fourth QSO was what made the difference - it was with Simon's XYL Helen 2E0VMP/P who was operating
    from Derbyshire on a local hill. Helen can not only be proud of her
    husband but perhaps share in some of that credit.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.


    (ED DURRANT DD5LP)


    **
    GETTING IN SHAPE FOR AMATEUR RADIO DIRECTION-FINDING

    JIM/ANCHOR: It's ham radio on the run. Finding hidden transmitters in
    the woods is a growing sport. Here's Joe Moell (MELL) K-zero-O-V with an upcoming opportunity.

    JOE'S REPORT: Spring is still a few weeks away, but the season has
    already started for Amateur Radio Direction Finding, or ARDF.
    California's first introductory session of on-foot transmitter hunting
    took place in Irwindale on January 28.

    And later this month, there will be nine days of intense ARDF training
    near Raleigh, North Carolina. It's sponsored by the Backwoods
    Orienteering Klub and it will be led by Illia Ivanko. He's a former
    member of the elite Ukrainian ARDF team and now lives in the USA. Illia
    was a multi-medal-winner at the 2017 IARU Region 2 ARDF championships
    with the best in both classic events in the age category requiring the
    finding of all five-fox transmitters. At the 2012 World Championships
    in Serbia, he was silver medalist in both the two-meter and 80-meter
    classic competitions, beating competitors from a dozen other countries.

    This month's training sessions will begin on February 17 and will take
    place in The Triangle area near Raleigh-Durham Airport. More information
    is at backwoodsok.org.

    From southern California, this is Joe Moell K-zero-Oscar-Victor.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    N8VAA repeater, serving parts of West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania and the Potomac Highlands Amateur Radio club from
    Moorefield, West Virginia on Monday nights at 8.


    **

    GROUNDHOG DAY SPECIAL EVENT CASTS SHADOWS

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Pennsylvania, Groundhog Day awakens a special weather-forecasting rodent and also inspires local hams. Here's more
    from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: It's a proud tradition on Groundhog Day for the
    Punxsutawney Area Amateur Radio Club K3HWJ to run its special event
    station around the same time that Punxsutawney Phil, America's celebrity groundhog, wakes up and goes in search of his shadow to find out how
    many more weeks of winter we should expect. Phil, of course, always gets
    the limelight at Gobbler's Knob while the hams call QRZ on the Saturday closest to the holiday using their shack at the Puxsutawney Airport.
    According to Steve Waltman KB3FPN, it's a longstanding tradition and
    it's as seasonal as the arrival of spring or - in the case of this
    year's prediction - as seasonal as the wintry weeks some of us still
    have left. Steve said conditions on 40 and 20 meters were a little more challenging for this year's event on Saturday the 3rd of February but
    the handful of contacts kept the proud tradition going for another year.
    Next year should bring especially good timing since Groundhog Day falls
    on a Saturday. Maybe next year Phil will even find a little spring in
    his step.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    **
    AFTERLIFE FOR STATIONS AFTER WRTC

    JIM/ANCHOR: After this summer's World RadioSport Team Championship ends,
    the equipment isn't likely to gather dust. Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP with
    the details.

    ED's REPORT: What happens to equipment after the World RadioSport Team Championship is finished?

    As of February 1st, radio clubs and groups around Germany have been
    allowed to request purchase of a "Station Packet" for a discounted price
    of €2000. These are the actual equipment packs that will be used in the
    WRTC, and to be collected by their new owners after the event is finished.

    The packs consists of a Spiderbeam 40 through 10 meter antenna, an 80
    meter dipole antenna, three 50 meter lengths of low loss coax, a Yaesu G1000DXC rotator, cable and controller, a Spiderbeam 14.5 meter
    aluminium mast, a Honda EU20i generator, a 50m reel of power cable with
    a 6-outlet board, a "High Peak Benito" tent, 3 tables and 3 chairs and
    various small items such as fan, table lamp, etc.

    It is expected that all packs will be sold by the time this report goes
    to air.

    For details of WRTC 2018, please go to WRTC2018 (dot) DE on the web.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    AUSTRALIAN AMATEUR TV REPEATER'S ON THE MOVE

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Victoria, Australia, an amateur TV repeater is looking
    for a new home, as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN: The Amateur Television repeater VK3RTV which has been the mainstay
    for greater Melbourne and Geelong is enroute to a new home - somewhere.
    Its operations at Olina have been shut down and the site was
    decommissioned after the repeater's tower was taken down. Surrey Hills
    is being eyed as a possible new site and test transmissions are being
    sent to determine its suitability. VK3RTV's transmissions will be moved
    from an output of 446.5 MHz to 445.6 MHz so that a guard band can be
    created to reduce transmissions out of band.

    Although operators will miss the good coverage from Mount Dandenong, the Surrey Hills site and one other possible site -- Mount View in Mount
    Waverly -- show promise.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (AMATEUR RADIO VICTORIA)

    **

    FCC SEEKS INPUT ON WEATHER RESPONSE

    JIM/ANCHOR: The FCC wants to hear from you about emergency response to
    this past Atlantic hurricane season. Here's Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER'S REPORT: In the U.S., the Atlantic hurricane season is over -
    but in a way it's not really finished. The Federal Communications
    Commission has been trying to assess emergency response to the deadly
    2017 season, which included the four major hurricanes Maria, Nate,
    Harvey and Irma in the U.S. and its territories.

    The agency's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau was receiving
    public comments until the 22nd of January and is now awaiting reply
    comments which are due no later than the 21st of February. The notice,
    which is on the FCC website, is PS Docket Number 17-344.

    Comments are being sought on broadcasters' response, government agency response and of course amateur radio response. The FCC is looking for
    answers in particular as to whether ham radio services should be
    increased to assist in the planning, testing and delivery of emergency response and recovery communications.

    For assistance in filing your comments online, call the FCC's Electronic Comment Filing System at 202-418-0193. You can also file directly from
    the website at fcc dot gov forward slash ecfs (fcc.gov/ecfs)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD


    (FCC)

    **

    THE WORLD OF DX


    In the world of DX, members of the Veron Club station PI4FL in the
    Netherlands are active until the 28th of February. They are on the air
    marking the 40th anniversary of their club. According to QRZ, QSL cards
    are being accepted by PA3HEB via the bureau.

    On Bonaire, John, K4BAI, is active as PJ4/K4BAI until February 23rd. Be listening for him with the PJ4A team during the ARRL International DX CW Contest which runs February 17th and 18th. Send QSLs to PJ4A and
    PJ4/K4BAI via K4BAI.

    In Barbados, Richard G3RWL will once again be active as 8P6DR between
    March 20th and April 29th. He will be working holiday style on 80-10
    meters using CW and some RTTY. Send QSLs via his home callsign, direct
    or by the Bureau using ClubLog's OQRS.


    (OHIO-PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: ALIVE AND STILL KICKING

    JIM/ANCHOR: Finally, we hear the story of one ham in Canada who went
    searching for a atellite and surprised even NASA. Here's Mike Askins
    KE5CXP.

    MIKE: Scott Tilley VE7TIL is almost always in search of a somewhat
    unusual QSO: He's often listening for secret military satellites. One of
    his more recent attempts to sniff out something interesting put him on
    the trail of the Zuma satellite. Zuma was a secret U.S. government
    payload that had gone missing shortly after its launch in January. No
    one really knows what happened to Zuma - it was a secret mission, after
    all -- but that didn't stop Scott, an amateur radio astronomer, from
    trying.

    Enroute to his hoped-for contact with the super-secret spy in the sky,
    Scott instead came across another one that turned out to be a voice from
    the undead. He heard a transmission -- clear and unmistakable - from
    what he believed was the NASA satellite called IMAGE. The only thing is
    this: IMAGE had long since severed communications with NASA back in
    2005. The satellite had gone high above the Earth in 2000 in the hopes
    of studying the magnetosphere but NASA believed a power malfunction took
    it out of service permanently.

    As Scott might say, rumors of its death may be greatly exaggerated. He
    soon realized this could indeed be IMAGE and it was still transmitting
    quite actively. He even successfully matched its rotation rate to the
    rate associated with the IMAGE satellite. That, of course, piqued NASA's interest.

    NASA told the aerospace website AmericaSpace that if this is indeed
    IMAGE, it would like to put the satellite back on the job. In other
    words, death is no excuse for not showing up to work - even after 13 years.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.


    (ARSTECHNICA)


    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur Radio Victoria;
    Arstechnica; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; the FCC; Grady Evans W4GLE; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; Huntsville Amateur Radio Club; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; Valerie Hotzfeld NV9L; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 09, 2018 09:20:08
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2102 for February 9, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2102 with a release date of Friday, February 9 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The Bouvet Island DXpedition is scrapped. School
    Club Roundup gears up in the U.S. - and in Australia, an amateur TV
    repeater is on the move. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline
    Report 2102 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    TOP STORY: BOUVET ISLAND DXPEDITION SCRAPPED

    JIM/ANCHOR: Our top story this week is the Bouvet Island DXpedition
    3Y0Z, a journey that turned out to be different from the one so
    long-awaited by the amateur radio community. After experiencing problems
    with the weather and one of the ship's engines, the team reluctantly
    aborted their mission on Saturday the 3rd of February for safety reasons
    - even with Bouvet itself clearly in view. As they reversed course,
    ocean conditions diverted their planned return to Chile and the ship was rerouted to Cape Town, South Africa where the radio operators plan to
    catch flights home. In the meantime, they are safe and have been
    operating maritime mobile as time permits using CW and FT-8 with their 100-watt rigs said their lead pilot, Valerie Hotzfeld, NV9L. The team is
    also making plans to ship the radio equipment back home.
    Val said their estimated arrival on U.S. soil should be sometime around
    the 15th and 16th of this month. The saga of what is easily one of the
    most expensive DXpeditions ever is not over yet. Plans are being worked
    on to try again.

    (VALERIE HOTZFELD, NV9L)

    **
    FIRST-TIMERS ENTER SCHOOL CLUB ROUNDUP

    JIM/ANCHOR: The chase to contact school ham radio clubs is on again and
    this time there's a brand new club in the contest. Neil Rapp WB9VPG has
    more.

    NEIL'S REPORT: It’s time once again for School Club Roundup! Twice each
    year, school clubs from elementary through college get on the air for a
    week to make as many contacts as possible. The event takes place Monday, February 12th through Friday, February 17th. The exchange is RS(T),
    class (individual, club, or school) and state, province, or country. So
    get on the air and give these budding students someone to contact. They
    will be on all bands and modes but there are suggested frequencies on
    each band. That’s where you will find most of the schools. At least one
    of those school clubs is so new that it's getting on the air for the
    first time during the Roundup! Ben Piecora, K2CPU, a 15-year-old student
    at West Islip High School in New York, worked School Club Roundup
    stations from home in the past and decided to get permission to add his school, complete with a vanity callsign W2WIH, to those participating.

    BEN: Originally, the whole story of the starting this club is... I got
    my license and he got his license, and we met at the VE session. And
    then towards the the end of the year, I jokingly suggested that we start
    a radio club. He was like, "That's actually a cool idea." So, this
    September we started going through with it, and requested the callsign
    and got the vanity callsign, and all that stuff... and set up the
    logbooks. So, we are all ready to go with the contesting software.

    NEIL: Ben explains that they are starting with a temporary setup to get
    the ball rolling.

    BEN: My teacher, KD2FKP... he just bought his 7300 for his home
    station. So we're just going to use that. We're planning on setting up
    a 40 and 20 meter dipole up about 30 feethoping to make some contacts.

    NEIL: The event is sponsored by the Long Island Mobile Amateur Radio
    Club and ARRL. Look for hashtag arrlscr on Twitter, and for complete
    rules visit ARRL.org/school-club-roundup. For Amateur Radio Newsline,
    I’m Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, hoping to hear YOU on the air from K9SOU.

    **
    ALABAMA OLD-TIMERS GET THEIR BIG NIGHT

    JIM/ANCHOR: On the opposite end of the ham radio timeline are the
    old-timers - and they had their big night recently in Huntsville,
    Alabama. Here's Paul Braun WD9GCO with more.

    PAUL'S REPORT: You don't need to rely on DMR and digital modes to
    generate excitement in amateur radio. Sometimes even the newest hams
    enjoy a trip back to radio's roots. The February 2nd meeting of the
    Huntsville Amateur Radio Club in Huntsville, Alabama turned back the
    clock and turned over the proceedings to veteran hams for "Old Timers'
    Night." Leading the road back was club vice president M.D. Smith WA4DXP,
    who emcee'd the parade of memories back to the 1960s and beyond. One ham
    told how he had turned an old AM radio receiver into a low-power AM transmitter which used a record player as its input. M.D. himself
    recalled the first electronic keyer he built in 1962, the year he got
    his license. These are the kinds of tales older hams are famous for, of course, but the audience included a good many enthusiastic young Tech
    tickets. The response was a mix of amazement and perhaps inspiration as
    many told the storytellers: Gee whiz, I can't believe you did all that
    with so little stuff!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (HUNTSVILLE AMATEUR RADIO CLUB)

    **

    AMATEURS PREPARE TO MARK ALABAMA'S BICENTENNIAL

    JIM/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, Alabama hams everywhere are poised to celebrate.
    What's the big deal? Stephen Kinford N8WB tells us.

    STEPHEN: Fresh from celebrating its 198th birthday on December 14th, the
    State of Alabama is ready to party, ham-radio style. It's a big blowout
    that will continue for the next two years until the state's bicentennial
    year. The Alabama Bicentennial Amateur Radio Club AL2C marked the
    occasion late last year with Gov. Kay Ivey and control operator Otto
    Arnoscht N4UZZ but that on-air moment is hardly the end of it. Special
    event stations will be operating throughout the state in the months
    ahead, beginning with a station at the BirmingHamFest on March 2nd and
    3rd on HF and possibly D-Star on REF058B. Any special event operations
    that happen subsequently on DMR can be found on Brandmeister TG-3101
    Alabama.

    You can keep track of happenings on the club's Facebook Page or on the
    website al2c dot org (al2c.org) or QRZ. Send QSLs via Logbook of the
    World. Hams wanting a certificate can download and print one out at the
    club website.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (Grady L. Evans W4GLE)

    **
    IN THE UK, SOTA ENTHUSIAST REACHES NEW PEAK

    JIM/ANCHOR: Hams in the Summits on the Air program always set their
    sights on new peaks - and one ham in the UK just reached a new one, as
    we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: There's nothing like having a cooperative spouse if you're going
    to achieve great heights in amateur radio. For one UK amateur active in
    the Summits on the Air program, it proved invaluable to his achieving
    the honor of Mountain Goat status. On his latest SOTA expedition, Simon Melhuish G4TJC reached the qualifying 1,000 points as an activator,
    earning him that honor. The Derbyshire amateur was operating in the
    company of his friend Allan Jones GW4VPX, himself a Mountain Goat. To
    achieve his goal, Simon had to collect four distinct QSOs from a summit
    in the Arenig range of Snowdonia. His friend Allan wasn't his only inspiration, however. That all-important fourth QSO was what made the difference - it was with Simon's XYL Helen 2E0VMP/P who was operating
    from Derbyshire on a local hill. Helen can not only be proud of her
    husband but perhaps share in some of that credit.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.


    (ED DURRANT DD5LP)


    **
    GETTING IN SHAPE FOR AMATEUR RADIO DIRECTION-FINDING

    JIM/ANCHOR: It's ham radio on the run. Finding hidden transmitters in
    the woods is a growing sport. Here's Joe Moell (MELL) K-zero-O-V with an upcoming opportunity.

    JOE'S REPORT: Spring is still a few weeks away, but the season has
    already started for Amateur Radio Direction Finding, or ARDF.
    California's first introductory session of on-foot transmitter hunting
    took place in Irwindale on January 28.

    And later this month, there will be nine days of intense ARDF training
    near Raleigh, North Carolina. It's sponsored by the Backwoods
    Orienteering Klub and it will be led by Illia Ivanko. He's a former
    member of the elite Ukrainian ARDF team and now lives in the USA. Illia
    was a multi-medal-winner at the 2017 IARU Region 2 ARDF championships
    with the best in both classic events in the age category requiring the
    finding of all five-fox transmitters. At the 2012 World Championships
    in Serbia, he was silver medalist in both the two-meter and 80-meter
    classic competitions, beating competitors from a dozen other countries.

    This month's training sessions will begin on February 17 and will take
    place in The Triangle area near Raleigh-Durham Airport. More information
    is at backwoodsok.org.

    From southern California, this is Joe Moell K-zero-Oscar-Victor.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    N8VAA repeater, serving parts of West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania and the Potomac Highlands Amateur Radio club from
    Moorefield, West Virginia on Monday nights at 8.


    **

    GROUNDHOG DAY SPECIAL EVENT CASTS SHADOWS

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Pennsylvania, Groundhog Day awakens a special weather-forecasting rodent and also inspires local hams. Here's more
    from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: It's a proud tradition on Groundhog Day for the
    Punxsutawney Area Amateur Radio Club K3HWJ to run its special event
    station around the same time that Punxsutawney Phil, America's celebrity groundhog, wakes up and goes in search of his shadow to find out how
    many more weeks of winter we should expect. Phil, of course, always gets
    the limelight at Gobbler's Knob while the hams call QRZ on the Saturday closest to the holiday using their shack at the Puxsutawney Airport.
    According to Steve Waltman KB3FPN, it's a longstanding tradition and
    it's as seasonal as the arrival of spring or - in the case of this
    year's prediction - as seasonal as the wintry weeks some of us still
    have left. Steve said conditions on 40 and 20 meters were a little more challenging for this year's event on Saturday the 3rd of February but
    the handful of contacts kept the proud tradition going for another year.
    Next year should bring especially good timing since Groundhog Day falls
    on a Saturday. Maybe next year Phil will even find a little spring in
    his step.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    **
    AFTERLIFE FOR STATIONS AFTER WRTC

    JIM/ANCHOR: After this summer's World RadioSport Team Championship ends,
    the equipment isn't likely to gather dust. Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP with
    the details.

    ED's REPORT: What happens to equipment after the World RadioSport Team Championship is finished?

    As of February 1st, radio clubs and groups around Germany have been
    allowed to request purchase of a "Station Packet" for a discounted price
    of €2000. These are the actual equipment packs that will be used in the
    WRTC, and to be collected by their new owners after the event is finished.

    The packs consists of a Spiderbeam 40 through 10 meter antenna, an 80
    meter dipole antenna, three 50 meter lengths of low loss coax, a Yaesu G1000DXC rotator, cable and controller, a Spiderbeam 14.5 meter
    aluminium mast, a Honda EU20i generator, a 50m reel of power cable with
    a 6-outlet board, a "High Peak Benito" tent, 3 tables and 3 chairs and
    various small items such as fan, table lamp, etc.

    It is expected that all packs will be sold by the time this report goes
    to air.

    For details of WRTC 2018, please go to WRTC2018 (dot) DE on the web.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    AUSTRALIAN AMATEUR TV REPEATER'S ON THE MOVE

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Victoria, Australia, an amateur TV repeater is looking
    for a new home, as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN: The Amateur Television repeater VK3RTV which has been the mainstay
    for greater Melbourne and Geelong is enroute to a new home - somewhere.
    Its operations at Olina have been shut down and the site was
    decommissioned after the repeater's tower was taken down. Surrey Hills
    is being eyed as a possible new site and test transmissions are being
    sent to determine its suitability. VK3RTV's transmissions will be moved
    from an output of 446.5 MHz to 445.6 MHz so that a guard band can be
    created to reduce transmissions out of band.

    Although operators will miss the good coverage from Mount Dandenong, the Surrey Hills site and one other possible site -- Mount View in Mount
    Waverly -- show promise.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (AMATEUR RADIO VICTORIA)

    **

    FCC SEEKS INPUT ON WEATHER RESPONSE

    JIM/ANCHOR: The FCC wants to hear from you about emergency response to
    this past Atlantic hurricane season. Here's Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER'S REPORT: In the U.S., the Atlantic hurricane season is over -
    but in a way it's not really finished. The Federal Communications
    Commission has been trying to assess emergency response to the deadly
    2017 season, which included the four major hurricanes Maria, Nate,
    Harvey and Irma in the U.S. and its territories.

    The agency's Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau was receiving
    public comments until the 22nd of January and is now awaiting reply
    comments which are due no later than the 21st of February. The notice,
    which is on the FCC website, is PS Docket Number 17-344.

    Comments are being sought on broadcasters' response, government agency response and of course amateur radio response. The FCC is looking for
    answers in particular as to whether ham radio services should be
    increased to assist in the planning, testing and delivery of emergency response and recovery communications.

    For assistance in filing your comments online, call the FCC's Electronic Comment Filing System at 202-418-0193. You can also file directly from
    the website at fcc dot gov forward slash ecfs (fcc.gov/ecfs)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD


    (FCC)

    **

    THE WORLD OF DX


    In the world of DX, members of the Veron Club station PI4FL in the
    Netherlands are active until the 28th of February. They are on the air
    marking the 40th anniversary of their club. According to QRZ, QSL cards
    are being accepted by PA3HEB via the bureau.

    On Bonaire, John, K4BAI, is active as PJ4/K4BAI until February 23rd. Be listening for him with the PJ4A team during the ARRL International DX CW Contest which runs February 17th and 18th. Send QSLs to PJ4A and
    PJ4/K4BAI via K4BAI.

    In Barbados, Richard G3RWL will once again be active as 8P6DR between
    March 20th and April 29th. He will be working holiday style on 80-10
    meters using CW and some RTTY. Send QSLs via his home callsign, direct
    or by the Bureau using ClubLog's OQRS.


    (OHIO-PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: ALIVE AND STILL KICKING

    JIM/ANCHOR: Finally, we hear the story of one ham in Canada who went
    searching for a atellite and surprised even NASA. Here's Mike Askins
    KE5CXP.

    MIKE: Scott Tilley VE7TIL is almost always in search of a somewhat
    unusual QSO: He's often listening for secret military satellites. One of
    his more recent attempts to sniff out something interesting put him on
    the trail of the Zuma satellite. Zuma was a secret U.S. government
    payload that had gone missing shortly after its launch in January. No
    one really knows what happened to Zuma - it was a secret mission, after
    all -- but that didn't stop Scott, an amateur radio astronomer, from
    trying.

    Enroute to his hoped-for contact with the super-secret spy in the sky,
    Scott instead came across another one that turned out to be a voice from
    the undead. He heard a transmission -- clear and unmistakable - from
    what he believed was the NASA satellite called IMAGE. The only thing is
    this: IMAGE had long since severed communications with NASA back in
    2005. The satellite had gone high above the Earth in 2000 in the hopes
    of studying the magnetosphere but NASA believed a power malfunction took
    it out of service permanently.

    As Scott might say, rumors of its death may be greatly exaggerated. He
    soon realized this could indeed be IMAGE and it was still transmitting
    quite actively. He even successfully matched its rotation rate to the
    rate associated with the IMAGE satellite. That, of course, piqued NASA's interest.

    NASA told the aerospace website AmericaSpace that if this is indeed
    IMAGE, it would like to put the satellite back on the job. In other
    words, death is no excuse for not showing up to work - even after 13 years.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.


    (ARSTECHNICA)


    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur Radio Victoria;
    Arstechnica; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; the FCC; Grady Evans W4GLE; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; Huntsville Amateur Radio Club; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; Valerie Hotzfeld NV9L; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 16, 2018 10:33:18

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2103 for Friday, Feb. 16, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2103 with a release date of Friday, February 16, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Theft and vandalism destroy a repeater in the
    UK. A Hamvention team member becomes a Silent Key -- and there's a new
    chance to get Bouvet Island in your log. All this and more as Amateur
    Radio Newsline Report 2103 comes your way right now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    BOUVET ISLAND REDUX

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We open this week's report with an update of sorts for
    DXers hoping to get Bouvet Island in their logbooks, despite the
    recently scrapped Three Why Zero Eye DXpedition (3Y0I). Robert Broomhead
    VK3DN has the good news.

    ROBERT: The Bouvet Island DXpedition is on - well, sort of. A team of
    eastern European amateurs who had planned their activation in late 2017
    has put the trip back on the calendar. Southgate Amateur News reported
    that Dominik 3Z9DX, Stanislaw SQ8X, Leszek SP3DOI, Branko YU4DX and
    Frans J69DS have put their trip back on the agenda with what they
    describe as [quote] "a matter of urgency." [endquote] The team had
    cancelled its plans late last year at the request of the 3Y0Z DXpedition
    that had to be unexpectedly aborted earlier this month after reaching
    its destination.

    Although no dates for the trip have been made public, reports indicate
    that the radio license has been renewed and the Norwegian Polar
    Institute has also issued a landing permit that is good through February
    of 2019. The team has indicated they want the expedition to occur during
    the Southern Hemisphere's sub-antarctic summer.

    So if you're still looking to get Bouvet Island in your logbook, you may
    get your chance after all. The team's plans will be to sail from South
    Africa to the island where they will set up a camp and radio on the
    glacier plateau.

    Until you can listen for Three Why Zero Eye (3Y0I) on the bands, watch
    for updates on their web page at bouvetoya dot org
    (https://bouvetoya.org) in Polish or a Google translated version is at
    tinyurl dot com forward slash Bouvet dash three Why Zero EYE (tinyurl.com/Bouvet-3Y0I)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    **

    VANDALS DESTROY REPEATER IN UK

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: It's tough enough when equipment failure knocks a
    repeater off the air, but in the UK presumed criminal activity has
    destroyed a popular SSTV repeater. Ed Durran DD5LP has those details.

    ED'S REPORT: Security had been high but it apparently was not enough to protect the MB7TV repeater used by the Martello Tower Group for SSTV. Following reports that the repeater had gone off the air, the group's
    chairman Tony G0MBA visited the site on Feb. 3 and discovered vandalism
    and theft had destroyed it.

    The cables had been cut and the repeater itself was stolen - a laptop, a Kenwood TM-D700E radio, SSTV interface, wi-fi interface, thermostatic controlled heater, PSU, 20ft pole, aerial and coax, according to Keith
    G6NHU.

    Keith told Amateur Radio Newsline that there are no suspects. He said
    [quote] "nobody outside the group knew the exact location of the
    repeater as the information on the website said it was located somewhere completely different. As far as we know there are no bad feelings
    between the group and other local hams so the only conclusion we can
    draw is that it's some chancers who have seen it on the wall and decided
    to break it open and steal the contents."

    The group estimated the cost of the equipment lost as between £600 and
    £700 -- or between eight hundred fifty and a thousand dollars in U.S. currency. Keith said there is no other local alternative until the
    repeater is rebuilt and put back on the air. The group has meanwhile
    requested financial gifts towards the costs of the new build via its
    website or through PayPal. For more information, contact repeaters at martellotowergroup dot com (repeaters@martellotowergroup.com).

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **
    SILENT KEY: HAMVENTION'S JERRY MILLER WD8QAI

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The ham radio community has suffered two big losses -
    two Silent Keys. We hear first from Don Wilbanks AE5DW with this report
    on the death of a key contributor to Dayton Hamvention.

    DON: Jerry Miller WD8QAI, one of Hamvention's core organizers become a
    Silent Key. Jerry died on Sunday, Feb. 11 at his Centerville, Ohio home.

    Jerry was a valued member of Dayton Amateur Radio Association, most
    especially on the board of directors and in helping the club put
    together the annual Dayton Hamvention. He also served as editor of its newsletter, the RF Carrier and was also considered the driving force
    behind the group's new clubhouse that became the W8BI ham shack.

    Jerry had been licensed since the 1970s and his name was widely known
    among hams around the world. A retiree from Delco Products, Jerry
    operated his own company, Windbluff Computer Services, in the Dayton area.

    Funeral services were to be held on Saturday the 17th of February at the Tobias Funeral Home's Beavercreek Chapel in Dayton.

    Hamvention's Michael Kalter W8CI said of Jerry: [quote] "He will be
    sorely missed by his family and hams all over the world." [endquote]

    Jerry Miller was 77.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    **
    SILENT KEY: DAVID HANNA WX4NCS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: A ham active in emergency communications in the
    Birmingham, Alabama area, has also become a Silent Key, as we hear from
    Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: Alabama amateurs are mourning the loss of David Hanna WX4NCS who
    died on the 10th of February in a tragic accident. David, who was active
    in emergency communications, had been cleaning his gun when it
    discharged, striking him in the chest. He was rushed to UAB Hospital in Birmingham where he died during emergency surgery. David, who lived in
    Leeds, worked as a security officer for Security Engineers, a private
    security firm in Birmingham. He was actively involved in Birmingham area emergency communications including Skywarn, and served as control
    manager of several local nets on VHF.
    He was an A-double-R-L Traffic Manager for Jefferson Co., as well as an Assistant Emergency Coordinator. A former firefighter and emergency
    medical technician, Hanna leaves a wife and young daughter.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    **

    FINE OF $50,000 IMPOSED ON HAM IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: As Newsline reported late last year, a ham in Trinidad
    and Tobago was awaiting sentencing after being found guilty of
    unlicensed radio transmissions. The judge has spoken and John Williams
    VK4JJW has that story.

    JOHN: An amateur radio operator in Trinidad and Tobago must pay a
    $50,000 fine or face five years in jail for unlicensed radio
    transmissions in 2007, before he was licensed.

    Desi-Lee Bonterre, a master certified electronics technician, had
    testified during his trial that he was in the process of repairing the transmitters when police visited his home 11 years ago and found the equipment. He was found guilty of operating without a license from his
    home. At the time, his attorney had asked for leniency for his client,
    who was eventually granted a license by the Telecommunications
    Authority, TATT. His attorney noted at the time that Bonterre, an Extra
    Class license holder in the U.S. is also an American Red Cross volunteer
    and a member of the Radio Emergency Association Citizen Team, or REACT.

    His QRZ page lists his U.S. call sign from a New Jersey address as N2DLB.

    Although Bonterre won his case in magistrate's court, the
    telecommunications authority appealed and the judges ruled that the prosecution had proven its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

    According to a recent report in the Trinidad and Tobago Newsday,
    Bonterre must pay the fine within 90 days or face prison.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO NEWSDAY)

    **

    AMATEUR BECOMES PRESIDENT OF HARVARD

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Add to the long list of achievements by amateur radio operators the presidency of Harvard University. As we hear from Heather
    Embee KB3TZD, the newest university president taking office this summer
    has a mission - and a call sign.

    HEATHER: Lawrence S. Bacow, KA1FZQ, of Brookline, Massachusetts, is
    taking office as the 29th president of Harvard University this summer. A graduate of MIT, Lawrence earned three additional degrees on the Harvard campus and now he can add "president" to that list. Bacow will take the
    reins of the campus effective July 1.

    Lawrence, who grew up in Pontiac, Michigan, is the son of a ham radio operator: the call signs W8JYZ and N4MB were used by his father
    Mitchell, who died in 2007.

    There's another reason Lawrence should feel right at home on campus:
    Harvard University is home to amateur radio station W1AF.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    **
    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    ZS0MOT repeater in Middelburg South Africa on Wednesdays at 1900 UTC.

    **
    RADIO SCOUTS RELEASE WORLD REPORT FOR JAMBOREE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Jamboree on the Air's official report has been released
    and Bill Stearns NE4RD has those details.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in Radio Scouting we have the release of the
    World Report for Jamboree on the Air for 2017 and we hear from Jim
    Wilson, K5ND, on his meeting in Kuala Lumpur.

    Although the U.S. numbers were down as previously reported, the world
    report on Jamboree on the Air and Jamboree on the Internet shows an
    increase of overall activity. Around 1.6 million people participated in
    the 2017 JOTA including 1.4 million youth at 28,178 locations around the
    globe representing 152 countries. This is an increase of around 200,000
    more participants over 2016. The most activity for Amateur Radio was
    found on SSB. Over on the Internet side, IRC (Internet Relay Chat)
    scored the top position. You can find a link to the full report on the jotajoti.info website.

    Every month we have a Net on Echolink that amateurs and scouters
    participate in to share stories and learn about various activities going
    on around the U.S. This month we had an update from Jim Wilson, K5ND,
    who just got back from the international committee meeting in Malaysia,
    about the good things to come from the new Secretary General of the
    World Organization of the Scout Movement, Mr. Ahmed AlHendawi.

    [K5ND] Perhaps one of the most exciting things for me personally was
    the Secretary General who was the United Nations Youth Envoy for a
    number of years has recently stepped into the World Organization of the
    Scout Movement as their Secretary General, very dynamic individual, very connected across the planet. They're actually opening an office in New
    York to better work with the United Nations, better work with the media center, essentially of the universe. Just a complete breakthrough in
    the thinking and the enthusiasm that is underway in that office in the thinking of Jamboree on the Air and Jamboree on the Internet.

    BILL: We also heard about high altitude ballooning from Keith Kaiser,
    WA0TJT, and how you can integrate this activity with your radio scouting adventures. All interested amateurs are invited to join the net monthly
    on the second Thursday of every month at 9PM central on the *JOTA-365* conference node.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **
    HAMS PREP FOR DIRECTION-FINDING COMPETITION

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: This summer, hams from all over will gather in northern California to run in the woods seeking hidden transmitters. Here with
    the details is Newsline's Joe Moell (MELL) K-zero-O-V, who is also the
    ARRL's Direction Finding Coordinator.

    JOE: They range in age from the teens to the 70s and they're coming from
    all over to compete in the most physical of all ham radio sports. I'm
    talking about on-foot hidden transmitter hunters, also called foxtailers
    and radio-orienteers. Their sport is Amateur Radio Direction Finding,
    or ARDF.

    It's all done on foot in a BIG outdoor space. Thanks to a set of
    standard international rules, it's pretty much the same all over the
    world so we can have international competitions. Your mission is to try
    to find up to five hidden ham radio transmitters without assistance
    while on the run or trotting or just walking. You'll carry a map and
    compass so you don't get lost.

    You can mix in with the USA's best radio-orienteers at the eighteenth
    national ARDF championships in mid-June near Truckee, California, which
    is 33 miles southwest of Reno, Nevada. It starts off with a day of
    optional intense training on June 13, followed by four days of
    competition on the two-meter and eighty-meter bands. If your time is
    limited, just come for the classic competitions on the weekend.

    Learn from the experts, then see how you do for yourself out on the
    courses. You don't have to be a marathoner, but it helps to be in good
    shape. There are eleven separate categories with medals for the best
    three in each, so you'll only be competing against people of your own
    age range and gender.

    Registration for the championships will open soon. So start making
    plans. You can read all the details on the web at www.homingin.com.
    That's homingin -- as one word -- homingin.com.

    I hope to see YOU at the championships. For Amateur Radio Newsline,
    this is Joe Moell K-Zero-Oscar-Victor.

    **
    TOUGH SLEDDING FOR AMATEURS IN WISCONSIN

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: When hams find themselves operating in the cold grip of winter, public service events aren't likely to be the usual walkathons, marathons or bicycle races. Instead, think "mush" - as we hear from Kent Peterson KC0DGY.

    KENT's REPORT: When you're planning a serious sled-dog race, there are
    some things you just can't do without: First of all, you need dogs - but
    it's a good idea to bring along some ham radio operators too. Those
    elements plus some skilled mushers are what always seem to make the
    Apostle Islands Dog Sled Race in Bayfield, Wisconsin a success. Hams
    have been a part of this race in northern Bayfield County for the past
    23 years. The tracks of the various races along the Sand River Trail
    System reach within two miles of Lake Superior. The one thing the route doesn't reach, however, is a cell phone tower. According to Chris Keezer KC9NNV, that's where the hames come in.

    They are part of Wisconsin's ARES/RACES and experienced at passing
    traffic. Chris, who's been coordinating the amateurs at the race for
    four years, said this year's team of six amateurs welcomed Haily KD9GCC
    as a first-timer helping keep an eye on race participants at the various
    check points. Chris was also joined by Larry K9LRD, Travis KC9GYD, Joe
    KD9CJX and Chuck N9CZM.

    Chris told Newsline in an email: [quote] "We were there to keep everyone informed and for the safety of the races." [close quote]

    Chris said there were about 50 teams and they raced the clock as they
    covered as much as 80 miles a day on the weekend of February 3rd and
    4th. Keeping an eye out for safety in this kind of freezing weather, no
    doubt the hams themselves did their job doggedly.


    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY.


    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, begin listening on February 24th for members of the Lufthansa Amateur Radio Club of Frankfurt Germany as they begin
    operating as XV9DLH from Phu Quoc Island, Vietnam. It's not known how
    long they plan to be there. Operators include Bernhard/DK7TF and Jürgen/DH6ICE. QSL via DK8ZZ.

    Jean-Pierre F6ITD is operating as FG/F6ITD from the island of Guadeloupe
    until 15th of March. He can be found on SSB and FT8.

    Listen for Lou, W0FK, operating as W0FK/4 on Longboat Key between the
    first of March through the 14th. He will be on 40-10 meters using CW,
    SSB and FT8. According to his QRZ page, he will upload contacts to
    Logbook of the World. Contacts wanting a QSL card instead should send a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

    (OHIO PENN DX BULLETIN)


    **

    KICKER: QSL, ANOTHER WAY OF CONTACTING YOUR IDENTITY

    STEPHEN: Sometimes a QSL card is just a QSL card. Other times it's the
    start of some amazing new connections that turn out to be - well - very
    OLD connections. We'll let Mike Askins KE5CXP explain.

    MIKE'S REPORT: One of the mainstays of amateur radio is the QSL card.
    It's a mutual confirmation of contact. But what happens when a new
    contact turns out to very possibly be an old contact -- one that
    happened, say, generations and generations ago? That may well be the
    case for Rita McConnell NE0DB of Colorado and Gene Giddings AA1XD of
    Maine. On the last day of 2017, Rita received a card from Gene
    confirming their recent QSO. Rita noted Gene's last name - Giddings - is
    the same as her maiden name.

    Having a great interest in researching ancestry, Rita started digging.
    She noted in a Facebook post on December 31 that, at the very least, the
    two amateurs may share a New England connection.

    She wrote: [quote] "We discovered that our eighth great-grandfather
    landed in Ipswich, Massachusetts on the Planter in 1635." [endquote]

    This piqued Gene's interest even more. Gene told Newsline that he
    suspects the connection, if there is one, does indeed go way, way back.
    He has enlisted the help of a friend who is good at such research and
    she is helping him do his own side of the genealogical dig. Now, he
    says, it is time to wait and see.

    Clearly, our QSL cards tell the world who we are - through our call
    signs, our photos and our addresses - but for these two hams, the
    discovery of identity through a QSL card may turn out to be so much more.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; Chris Keezer KC9NNV;
    CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; K2BSA; Michael Kalter W8CI; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ;
    Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the Trinidad
    and Tobago Newsday; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and
    you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please
    send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information
    is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 23, 2018 12:11:50

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2104 for Friday, February 23, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2104 with a release date of Friday, February 23, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A planned DXPedition will honor Amelia Earhart.
    CQ Magazine is looking for some Hall of Famers -- and we revisit the distracted-driving controversy. All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2104 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    HAMS AND DISTRACTED DRIVING, REVISITED

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast by revisiting the
    controversial issue of distracted driving laws and ham radio - a
    particularly murky area, at times, when it comes to hams traveling
    outside their home territories. Kent Peterson KC0DGY updates us on the
    issue as it relates to the U.S. and Canada.

    KENT: An Amateur Radio Newsline Report several weeks ago noted that U.S.
    hams wishing to operate mobile while behind the wheel in New Brunswick, Canada, would be breaking the law. We heard from Dave Goodwin VE9CB,
    Atlantic Director of Radio Amateurs of Canada, who contends this is not correct. Additional reporting by us has found that while a reciprocal
    treaty for radio operators does indeed exist between the U.S. and
    Canada, a tangle of local regulations has caused much confusion and
    appears to supersede this treaty.

    Distracted driving regulations have been imposed by State and Provincial governments in both the US and Canada. Individual amateurs and groups
    have lobbied their own localities for exemptions for Amateur Radio
    operation. Where such exemptions for radio exist, language in many of
    these regulations only allow for mobile operation by amateur radio
    operators provided they are licensed residents of that country.

    Treaty Series 1952 Number 7, which governs amateur radio by Canadians operating in the US and US amateurs operating in Canada, allows for
    reciprocal operation across borders. But the various states and
    provinces have distracted-driving regulations that fail to take this
    treaty into account.

    Newsline obtained an email from Alan Killam, licensing officer in New Brunswick, who points out their provincial regulation only covers
    amateur radio operators licensed in Canada. It is important to clarify
    that Newsline has not been able to find any instances of an American
    Amateur being cited in the provincial distracted driving regulations.

    Newsline did make repeated requests to the New Brunswick Attorney
    General's office for clarification on their regulation, but our requests
    went unanswered.

    Conversely, distracted-driving regulations in Connecticut, Delaware,
    Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Washington and West Virginia
    state require an FCC license for legal mobile amateur radio operation.
    Only the state of New Jersey generically specifies licensed amateur
    radio operators may operate mobile. Thus, for Canadian amateur radio
    licensees to operate mobile in the U.S. would require that that those operators also hold a valid FCC license.

    Amateurs in either country need to research the distracted driving
    regulations in the state/province they plan to operate in and be
    prepared to defend a moving citation.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY

    **

    SWEDISH AMATEURS TAKE NEW LOOK AT HAND-HELD MICROPHONE BAN

    NEIL/ANCHOR: With distracted-driving regulations becoming more and more commonplace, concerns about mobile operation of amateur radios have
    become increasingly global. Add one more country to that list, as we
    hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: In Sweden, the SSA, the country's national amateur radio
    organization, recently asked the government to revisit legislation that
    bans the use of mobile phones while driving. The radio group is hoping
    to clarify the wording which it fears may impact on hams operating
    mobile in their vehicles as well as on those in the transport industry.
    The group is asking, in its letter to the Ministry of Food and
    Transport, that the wording make it clear that the ban is not applicable
    to hand-held microphones attached to radios mounted inside the vehicles.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO)

    **

    BAKER ISLAND DXPEDITION TO HONOR EARHART

    NEIL/ANCHOR: American aviatrix Amelia Earhart still captures the
    imagination of the world and certainly the world of amateur radio. This
    year, the pilot is being remembered as part of a larger commemoration on
    a major DXpedition, as we hear from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM M: Most of us remember the American amateur Brian Lloyd WB6RQN who
    last year commemorated Amelia Earhart's final flight by piloting his single-engine plane around the globe along what was Earhart's final
    route. This year the Baker Island DXpedition KH1/KH7Z is staging its own tribute, marking the 81st anniversary of Earhart's disappearance on that flight. At the same time, the DXpedition is also honoring the colony of students who were living on those islands at the time of her flight and
    who had helped prepare for her arrival.

    Earhart went missing on July 2, 1937 near Baker and Howland islands. An airstrip had been built for her much-anticipated landing by Hui
    Panala'au students from Hawaii who were living on the islands at the
    time. The students were living there as part of a colonization project designed to help legitimize the islands as U.S. territories. They
    awaited the pilot's landing, which never came.

    The location is the fourth most-wanted DX entity.

    The DXpedition is expected to cost an estimated $400,000 in U.S.
    currency with the operator team contributing about half.

    For more details, visit baker2018.net

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    **
    CQ MAGAZINE SEEKS HALL OF FAME NOMINEES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: It's not enough to make a good contact on the air - it's
    often the connections made with other hams in person that count more. CQ Magazine has plans to recognize these amateurs and Stephen Kinford N8WB
    tells us to get involved.

    STEPHEN's REPORT: If there is a ham whose contributions make you proud
    to be part of this hobby, you have until March 1st to show your
    admiration with a nomination for membership in one of three halls of
    fame: the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame, the DX Hall of Fame and the Contesting Hall of Fame.

    In making the announcement CQ Magazine noted that induction into one of
    these three groups is based on [quote] "considerable personal sacrifice" [endquote] -- in other words, an amateur who has gone above and beyond
    with tremendous personal effort.

    Clubs or individuals or even national organizations can make nominations
    and should do so before the March 1st deadline. Email submissions are preferred and can be sent to w 2 v u at cq hyphen amateur hyphen radio
    dot com (w2vu@cq-amateur-radio.com). Conventional mail should be
    postmarked by March 1 and sent to CQ Magazine, 17 West John Street,
    Hicksville New York 11801 USA. Please indicate which hall of fame your nomination applies to.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (CQ MAGAZINE)

    **

    SILENT KEY: WIA'S JIM LINTON VK3PC

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The amateur radio community has suffered yet another major
    loss, a ham with a prominent role among Australian operators. We hear
    more from Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT'S REPORT: Jim Linton VK3PC, a mainstay of the Wireless Institute
    of Australia which he served as executive secretary, has become a Silent
    Key. He died on Thursday, the 22nd of February following a short battle
    with thyroid cancer.

    Jim, who was one of the WIA's longest-serving office holders, joined the organization as a teenager and an enthusiastic shortwave listener. A
    career journalist with 3UZ Nilsen's Broadcasting Service and later AAP
    news agency and various trade magazines, he became a senior newsman
    covering the major stories of the day. His active life in amateur radio included the presidency of WIA Victoria, WIA Federal Councillor, news
    editor of Amateur Radio magazine and guest editor. Known as a ham with a strong volunteer spirit, he was the WIA Exam Service inaugural assessor
    for VK3 and a WIA team member for a number of IARU Region 3 triennial conferences, IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee Chairman
    and the WIA IARU Liaison. He was also an honorary life member of the WIA
    which awarded him its highest honor in 2011: the GA Taylor Medal. He
    also received the Chris Jones Award for his exceptional contributions to
    the WIA and amateur radio.

    Jim Linton was age 71. Vale Jim Linton VK3PC.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the KE0MQF-R
    repeater in Sikeston, Missouri on Mondays at 7 p.m.

    **
    JAPANESE YLs GEAR UP FOR FESTIVAL

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The month of March brings a special festival for YLs in
    Japan and they're going - where else? - on the air to celebrate. Jeremy
    Boot G4NJH has those details.

    JEREMY: If YLs in Japan are a little busier than usual right now, it's
    because they're preparing to take part in a celebration that's believed
    to be at least 900 years old. It's called the Doll Festival, also known
    as Hina-matsuri, and it celebrates the birth of a baby girl while
    offering hope and prayers for her future happiness. Japanese families do
    that with an elaborate display of dolls at home, figurines dressed in
    ancient costumes.

    The day of the festival is March 3 - or on the calendar, three-three,
    the same numbers that YLs use to say goodbye to one another in ham
    radio. So on that day, the Japan Ladies Radio Society is operating the
    "3.3 Hina Contest" as a way of encouraging YLs to use three-three to say
    hello instead.

    Yukiko Maki 7K4TKB told Newsline that the event grew into a national
    contest from its humble beginnings 14 years ago. She said it's a way for
    YLs to meet other YLs on the air. By the way, it's not just for YLs -
    although a contact with a YL counts as 10 points while non-YL counts as
    only 1 point. The contest begins on the 2nd of March at 1500 UTC and
    continues until 1500 UTC on March 3. All modes and all bands, except for
    the WARC bands, may be used.

    For more details, visit the JLRS website at triple w dot jarl dot com
    forward slash jlrs forward slash and click on "Hina Contest" for contest
    rules in English. (www.jarl.dot.com/jlrs)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **
    NORWAY CONTESTERS GET A CALL SIGN BOOST

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Avid contesters in Norway just got encouraging news about
    the call signs they will be able to use, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Hams in Norway with big plans for radio contesting just got
    a boost from Norwegian authorities: amateurs can now apply for 2x1
    contest call signs that have the prefix LC. According to the NRRL - the Norwegian radio relay league - the call signs can only be used in
    national and international contests and are valid for five years after
    being assigned. The call signs cannot be used during Lighthouse Weekend,
    Field Day or Jamboree on the Air. In Norway, there is only one class of Amateur Radio license and it permits an operating output of up to 1,000
    watts. While the 2x1 call signs should give the hams something of a competitive edge, they're still going to have to win those contests on
    their own.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (SOUTHGATE, NRRL)

    **

    IN SEARCH OF AN AUSTRALIA-SOUTH AFRICA CONNECTION

    NEIL/ANCHOR: It's a long way between Australia and South Africa but one
    ham is looking to bridge that distance on 6 meters, as we hear from
    Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT: An amateur in western Australia is trying to stir up interest
    among hams to explore a VHF path between Australia and South Africa.
    Andy Hemus VK6OX, who lives in a suburb of Perth, believes that if there
    is a VHF path from Eastern Australia to Argentina, Chile and the South Shetland and nearby islands, then surely there must be one between South Africa's east coast and Australia's western coast. He's looking for a
    ham to try 6 meters with him using SSB, CW, JT65A or FT8.

    Noting that the season for Es propagation is pretty much done in the
    Southern Hemisphere, he'd still like to be able to plan for later in the
    year.

    This sort of challenge is nothing new. The South African Radio League, acknowledging the great and longstanding challenge of Indian Ocean
    contacts, notes that there have been attempts before - without success.
    A more recent campaign to stir up interest came from Ken Bainbridge
    VK6RH of the West Australian Radio Group. Ken had hoped at the time
    South African VHF operators would participate in chirp modulation tests
    but support for that experiment waned.

    Andy, meanwhile, remains hopeful someone will answer his call. Andy said
    he is reachable via email at vk6ox at wia dot org dot au
    (vk6ox@wia.org.au) or through ON4KST chat. As he told Newsline in an
    email [quote] "the six meter band has not been labeled 'the Magic Band'
    for no good reason, so anything\92s possible for those of us dedicated
    enough and around at the time of some weird and wonderful opening!"
    [endquote]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    (SARL, ANDY HEMUS VK6OX)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, Arnaud, JG1XMV, is active through the third of March
    as FK/JG1XMV from Grande Terre in New Caledonia. He is operating with
    Yves FK4RD. The duo will also activate two other islands - Lifou and
    Mare as FK/JG1XMV. Arnaud may also try to activate a few SOTAs. Send
    QSLs direct via JG1XMV, by the Bureau or by FK/JG1XMV via LoTW or eQSL.

    John, KB7LBY, is in Tanzania operating as 5H2LBY while ascending Mt. Kilimanjaro through March 2nd. His operating hours will be limited
    during his climb. He will be running QRP on 40/20 meters into a
    magnetic-loop antenna. QSL via LoTW.

    In Honduras, Clay, WC6YJ, will be active as HR8/WC6YJ from Rus Rus
    Hospital until the 28th of February. He is operating holiday style on 80 through 17 meters. Clay is using 10 to 15 watts into an end-fed wire
    antenna. QSL via LoTW or ClubLog.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: THREADS OF FRIENDSHIP AMONG YLS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Finally, we consider friendship, a common thread among
    radio amateurs. We close with this story about certain threads that have
    made their way into cross-stitch creations of a talented YL in the Philippines. Here's Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: Theresa Aniceto DW3TRZ knows her way around the dots and dashes
    of CW. Lately, though, when she has wanted to say thank you to other YLs
    for their help and friendship she's been using Xs instead. These are
    tiny, carefully crafted Xs that make up the cross-stitch needlework
    pieces she has been sending her far-away friends incorporating their
    call signs and the word "Mabuhay" (ma-BOO-hay) which, in the
    Philippines, is a welcoming wish for a good life.

    Unfortunately, Theresa has been off the air lately so her connections
    have been limited to email and social media.

    THERESA: My last transmission was first week of December last year. I
    think I pushed my rig too much on the CQWWCW contest and after that
    something went wrong.

    CARYN: While her rig awaits repairs, her friendships in the Young Ladies
    Radio League remain intact. The cross-stitching serves as a variation on
    the QSL card.

    THERESA: The Young Ladies, they are really helpful in their support, especially on Facebook. So they have been very supportive and encouraging.

    CARYN: Hams are no stranger to homebrew of course but this kind of
    homebrew is created with a needle and thread -- and that's something
    special in this worldwide community of YLs.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; the
    Norwegian Radio Relay League; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show;
    Waverley Amateur Radio Society; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, February 23, 2018 12:12:20

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2104 for Friday, February 23, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2104 with a release date of Friday, February 23, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A planned DXPedition will honor Amelia Earhart.
    CQ Magazine is looking for some Hall of Famers -- and we revisit the distracted-driving controversy. All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2104 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    HAMS AND DISTRACTED DRIVING, REVISITED

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast by revisiting the
    controversial issue of distracted driving laws and ham radio - a
    particularly murky area, at times, when it comes to hams traveling
    outside their home territories. Kent Peterson KC0DGY updates us on the
    issue as it relates to the U.S. and Canada.

    KENT: An Amateur Radio Newsline Report several weeks ago noted that U.S.
    hams wishing to operate mobile while behind the wheel in New Brunswick, Canada, would be breaking the law. We heard from Dave Goodwin VE9CB,
    Atlantic Director of Radio Amateurs of Canada, who contends this is not correct. Additional reporting by us has found that while a reciprocal
    treaty for radio operators does indeed exist between the U.S. and
    Canada, a tangle of local regulations has caused much confusion and
    appears to supersede this treaty.

    Distracted driving regulations have been imposed by State and Provincial governments in both the US and Canada. Individual amateurs and groups
    have lobbied their own localities for exemptions for Amateur Radio
    operation. Where such exemptions for radio exist, language in many of
    these regulations only allow for mobile operation by amateur radio
    operators provided they are licensed residents of that country.

    Treaty Series 1952 Number 7, which governs amateur radio by Canadians operating in the US and US amateurs operating in Canada, allows for
    reciprocal operation across borders. But the various states and
    provinces have distracted-driving regulations that fail to take this
    treaty into account.

    Newsline obtained an email from Alan Killam, licensing officer in New Brunswick, who points out their provincial regulation only covers
    amateur radio operators licensed in Canada. It is important to clarify
    that Newsline has not been able to find any instances of an American
    Amateur being cited in the provincial distracted driving regulations.

    Newsline did make repeated requests to the New Brunswick Attorney
    General's office for clarification on their regulation, but our requests
    went unanswered.

    Conversely, distracted-driving regulations in Connecticut, Delaware,
    Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Washington and West Virginia
    state require an FCC license for legal mobile amateur radio operation.
    Only the state of New Jersey generically specifies licensed amateur
    radio operators may operate mobile. Thus, for Canadian amateur radio
    licensees to operate mobile in the U.S. would require that that those operators also hold a valid FCC license.

    Amateurs in either country need to research the distracted driving
    regulations in the state/province they plan to operate in and be
    prepared to defend a moving citation.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY

    **

    SWEDISH AMATEURS TAKE NEW LOOK AT HAND-HELD MICROPHONE BAN

    NEIL/ANCHOR: With distracted-driving regulations becoming more and more commonplace, concerns about mobile operation of amateur radios have
    become increasingly global. Add one more country to that list, as we
    hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: In Sweden, the SSA, the country's national amateur radio
    organization, recently asked the government to revisit legislation that
    bans the use of mobile phones while driving. The radio group is hoping
    to clarify the wording which it fears may impact on hams operating
    mobile in their vehicles as well as on those in the transport industry.
    The group is asking, in its letter to the Ministry of Food and
    Transport, that the wording make it clear that the ban is not applicable
    to hand-held microphones attached to radios mounted inside the vehicles.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE AMATEUR RADIO)

    **

    BAKER ISLAND DXPEDITION TO HONOR EARHART

    NEIL/ANCHOR: American aviatrix Amelia Earhart still captures the
    imagination of the world and certainly the world of amateur radio. This
    year, the pilot is being remembered as part of a larger commemoration on
    a major DXpedition, as we hear from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM M: Most of us remember the American amateur Brian Lloyd WB6RQN who
    last year commemorated Amelia Earhart's final flight by piloting his single-engine plane around the globe along what was Earhart's final
    route. This year the Baker Island DXpedition KH1/KH7Z is staging its own tribute, marking the 81st anniversary of Earhart's disappearance on that flight. At the same time, the DXpedition is also honoring the colony of students who were living on those islands at the time of her flight and
    who had helped prepare for her arrival.

    Earhart went missing on July 2, 1937 near Baker and Howland islands. An airstrip had been built for her much-anticipated landing by Hui
    Panala'au students from Hawaii who were living on the islands at the
    time. The students were living there as part of a colonization project designed to help legitimize the islands as U.S. territories. They
    awaited the pilot's landing, which never came.

    The location is the fourth most-wanted DX entity.

    The DXpedition is expected to cost an estimated $400,000 in U.S.
    currency with the operator team contributing about half.

    For more details, visit baker2018.net

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF

    **
    CQ MAGAZINE SEEKS HALL OF FAME NOMINEES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: It's not enough to make a good contact on the air - it's
    often the connections made with other hams in person that count more. CQ Magazine has plans to recognize these amateurs and Stephen Kinford N8WB
    tells us to get involved.

    STEPHEN's REPORT: If there is a ham whose contributions make you proud
    to be part of this hobby, you have until March 1st to show your
    admiration with a nomination for membership in one of three halls of
    fame: the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame, the DX Hall of Fame and the Contesting Hall of Fame.

    In making the announcement CQ Magazine noted that induction into one of
    these three groups is based on [quote] "considerable personal sacrifice" [endquote] -- in other words, an amateur who has gone above and beyond
    with tremendous personal effort.

    Clubs or individuals or even national organizations can make nominations
    and should do so before the March 1st deadline. Email submissions are preferred and can be sent to w 2 v u at cq hyphen amateur hyphen radio
    dot com (w2vu@cq-amateur-radio.com). Conventional mail should be
    postmarked by March 1 and sent to CQ Magazine, 17 West John Street,
    Hicksville New York 11801 USA. Please indicate which hall of fame your nomination applies to.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (CQ MAGAZINE)

    **

    SILENT KEY: WIA'S JIM LINTON VK3PC

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The amateur radio community has suffered yet another major
    loss, a ham with a prominent role among Australian operators. We hear
    more from Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT'S REPORT: Jim Linton VK3PC, a mainstay of the Wireless Institute
    of Australia which he served as executive secretary, has become a Silent
    Key. He died on Thursday, the 22nd of February following a short battle
    with thyroid cancer.

    Jim, who was one of the WIA's longest-serving office holders, joined the organization as a teenager and an enthusiastic shortwave listener. A
    career journalist with 3UZ Nilsen's Broadcasting Service and later AAP
    news agency and various trade magazines, he became a senior newsman
    covering the major stories of the day. His active life in amateur radio included the presidency of WIA Victoria, WIA Federal Councillor, news
    editor of Amateur Radio magazine and guest editor. Known as a ham with a strong volunteer spirit, he was the WIA Exam Service inaugural assessor
    for VK3 and a WIA team member for a number of IARU Region 3 triennial conferences, IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee Chairman
    and the WIA IARU Liaison. He was also an honorary life member of the WIA
    which awarded him its highest honor in 2011: the GA Taylor Medal. He
    also received the Chris Jones Award for his exceptional contributions to
    the WIA and amateur radio.

    Jim Linton was age 71. Vale Jim Linton VK3PC.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the KE0MQF-R
    repeater in Sikeston, Missouri on Mondays at 7 p.m.

    **
    JAPANESE YLs GEAR UP FOR FESTIVAL

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The month of March brings a special festival for YLs in
    Japan and they're going - where else? - on the air to celebrate. Jeremy
    Boot G4NJH has those details.

    JEREMY: If YLs in Japan are a little busier than usual right now, it's
    because they're preparing to take part in a celebration that's believed
    to be at least 900 years old. It's called the Doll Festival, also known
    as Hina-matsuri, and it celebrates the birth of a baby girl while
    offering hope and prayers for her future happiness. Japanese families do
    that with an elaborate display of dolls at home, figurines dressed in
    ancient costumes.

    The day of the festival is March 3 - or on the calendar, three-three,
    the same numbers that YLs use to say goodbye to one another in ham
    radio. So on that day, the Japan Ladies Radio Society is operating the
    "3.3 Hina Contest" as a way of encouraging YLs to use three-three to say
    hello instead.

    Yukiko Maki 7K4TKB told Newsline that the event grew into a national
    contest from its humble beginnings 14 years ago. She said it's a way for
    YLs to meet other YLs on the air. By the way, it's not just for YLs -
    although a contact with a YL counts as 10 points while non-YL counts as
    only 1 point. The contest begins on the 2nd of March at 1500 UTC and
    continues until 1500 UTC on March 3. All modes and all bands, except for
    the WARC bands, may be used.

    For more details, visit the JLRS website at triple w dot jarl dot com
    forward slash jlrs forward slash and click on "Hina Contest" for contest
    rules in English. (www.jarl.dot.com/jlrs)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **
    NORWAY CONTESTERS GET A CALL SIGN BOOST

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Avid contesters in Norway just got encouraging news about
    the call signs they will be able to use, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Hams in Norway with big plans for radio contesting just got
    a boost from Norwegian authorities: amateurs can now apply for 2x1
    contest call signs that have the prefix LC. According to the NRRL - the Norwegian radio relay league - the call signs can only be used in
    national and international contests and are valid for five years after
    being assigned. The call signs cannot be used during Lighthouse Weekend,
    Field Day or Jamboree on the Air. In Norway, there is only one class of Amateur Radio license and it permits an operating output of up to 1,000
    watts. While the 2x1 call signs should give the hams something of a competitive edge, they're still going to have to win those contests on
    their own.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (SOUTHGATE, NRRL)

    **

    IN SEARCH OF AN AUSTRALIA-SOUTH AFRICA CONNECTION

    NEIL/ANCHOR: It's a long way between Australia and South Africa but one
    ham is looking to bridge that distance on 6 meters, as we hear from
    Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT: An amateur in western Australia is trying to stir up interest
    among hams to explore a VHF path between Australia and South Africa.
    Andy Hemus VK6OX, who lives in a suburb of Perth, believes that if there
    is a VHF path from Eastern Australia to Argentina, Chile and the South Shetland and nearby islands, then surely there must be one between South Africa's east coast and Australia's western coast. He's looking for a
    ham to try 6 meters with him using SSB, CW, JT65A or FT8.

    Noting that the season for Es propagation is pretty much done in the
    Southern Hemisphere, he'd still like to be able to plan for later in the
    year.

    This sort of challenge is nothing new. The South African Radio League, acknowledging the great and longstanding challenge of Indian Ocean
    contacts, notes that there have been attempts before - without success.
    A more recent campaign to stir up interest came from Ken Bainbridge
    VK6RH of the West Australian Radio Group. Ken had hoped at the time
    South African VHF operators would participate in chirp modulation tests
    but support for that experiment waned.

    Andy, meanwhile, remains hopeful someone will answer his call. Andy said
    he is reachable via email at vk6ox at wia dot org dot au
    (vk6ox@wia.org.au) or through ON4KST chat. As he told Newsline in an
    email [quote] "the six meter band has not been labeled 'the Magic Band'
    for no good reason, so anything\92s possible for those of us dedicated
    enough and around at the time of some weird and wonderful opening!"
    [endquote]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    (SARL, ANDY HEMUS VK6OX)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, Arnaud, JG1XMV, is active through the third of March
    as FK/JG1XMV from Grande Terre in New Caledonia. He is operating with
    Yves FK4RD. The duo will also activate two other islands - Lifou and
    Mare as FK/JG1XMV. Arnaud may also try to activate a few SOTAs. Send
    QSLs direct via JG1XMV, by the Bureau or by FK/JG1XMV via LoTW or eQSL.

    John, KB7LBY, is in Tanzania operating as 5H2LBY while ascending Mt. Kilimanjaro through March 2nd. His operating hours will be limited
    during his climb. He will be running QRP on 40/20 meters into a
    magnetic-loop antenna. QSL via LoTW.

    In Honduras, Clay, WC6YJ, will be active as HR8/WC6YJ from Rus Rus
    Hospital until the 28th of February. He is operating holiday style on 80 through 17 meters. Clay is using 10 to 15 watts into an end-fed wire
    antenna. QSL via LoTW or ClubLog.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: THREADS OF FRIENDSHIP AMONG YLS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Finally, we consider friendship, a common thread among
    radio amateurs. We close with this story about certain threads that have
    made their way into cross-stitch creations of a talented YL in the Philippines. Here's Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: Theresa Aniceto DW3TRZ knows her way around the dots and dashes
    of CW. Lately, though, when she has wanted to say thank you to other YLs
    for their help and friendship she's been using Xs instead. These are
    tiny, carefully crafted Xs that make up the cross-stitch needlework
    pieces she has been sending her far-away friends incorporating their
    call signs and the word "Mabuhay" (ma-BOO-hay) which, in the
    Philippines, is a welcoming wish for a good life.

    Unfortunately, Theresa has been off the air lately so her connections
    have been limited to email and social media.

    THERESA: My last transmission was first week of December last year. I
    think I pushed my rig too much on the CQWWCW contest and after that
    something went wrong.

    CARYN: While her rig awaits repairs, her friendships in the Young Ladies
    Radio League remain intact. The cross-stitching serves as a variation on
    the QSL card.

    THERESA: The Young Ladies, they are really helpful in their support, especially on Facebook. So they have been very supportive and encouraging.

    CARYN: Hams are no stranger to homebrew of course but this kind of
    homebrew is created with a needle and thread -- and that's something
    special in this worldwide community of YLs.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; the
    Norwegian Radio Relay League; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show;
    Waverley Amateur Radio Society; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 02, 2018 13:17:54
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2105 for Friday, March 2, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2105 with a release date of Friday,
    March 2 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Bouvet Island DXpeditioners extend some
    friendship and a special invitation. Dayton Hamvention is offering a new
    way for attendees to stay in touch -- and it's time to think about
    nominating the 2018 Young Ham of the Year. All this and more as Amateur
    Radio Newsline Report 2105 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    UPDATE: R.S.V.P. REQUESTED FOR BOUVET ISLAND

    JIM/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with yet another update on
    plans to activate Bouvet Island. There's speculation this adventure
    could become an even bigger team effort, as we hear from Jim Meachen
    ZL2BHF.

    JIM MEACHEN: In the spirit of cooperation so characteristic of amateur
    radio, the organizers of the 3Y0I Bouvet Island Expedition have extended
    an invitation to the team members from the recently scrapped 3Y0Z Bouvet expedition to operate together from the coveted DX location. The
    Polish-led team issued a statement in late February saying [quote] "we
    are fully aware and full of sympathy of their disappointment."
    [endquote] The team said it believes the shared operation will not only
    keep costs down for both teams but provide more opportunity to the
    global ham community. Although there has not yet been any response from
    the 3Y0Z team, it should be noted that their radio equipment meanwhile
    remains in storage in South Africa.

    Meanwhile, another team - the Saint Brandon Island DXpedition 3B7A --
    has announced that they expect to reach their Indian Ocean destination
    by early April. The eight-member team expects to be active from the 5th
    to the 17th of April. Saint Brandon Island is Number 28 on the DXCC most-wanted list.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    **

    YOUNG HAMS INVITED TO DX ADVENTURE IN CURACAO

    JIM/ANCHOR: Another DX adventure awaits too - this one specifically for
    young amateurs. It's in Curacao and, as we hear from Kevin Trotman
    N5PRE, the window to accept applications is getting ready to shut.

    KEVIN: If you're a young amateur with your sights set on big DX this
    summer, you have a few more days to apply for acceptance to this year's
    Dave Kalter Memorial Youth DX Adventure. The destination this year is
    the PJ2T contest site in Curacao. Three young amateurs between the ages
    of 12 and 17 will be accepted for the trip. They're to be accompanied by
    a parent or legal guardian who needn't be a licensed ham. All
    participants should have a valid passport and be a U.S. resident.

    The purpose of the trip is to teach young operators the best way to
    handle pileups, to learn how to optimize gray line propagation and, of
    course, to work as much DX as possible. This year's trip will take place
    July 19th through 24th.

    Application deadline is Saturday, March 17. A downloadable application
    form is available at qsl dot net slash n6jrl (qsl.net/n6jrl)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (YDXA)

    **
    NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC HIGHLIGHTS YL'S SPACE RECORD

    JIM/ANCHOR: Space is the ultimate DX, and one astronaut with a special
    claim to fame in the sky just got her own cover story here on Earth.
    Here's Heather Embee KB3TZD with that report.

    HEATHER: Even though she no longer has an active ham radio license,
    research biochemist Peggy Whitson has something that's perhaps just as
    good - a national record. The March edition of National Geographic
    magazine celebrates the International Space Station astronaut who last
    April surpassed the record for spending the cumulative time in space. In
    April 2017 she bested astronaut Jeff Williams' record of 534 days. Peggy
    also has the distinction of being the first woman to serve twice as
    commander of the ISS.

    The Iowa native, who turned 58 on February 9th, had been a Technician
    class operator, with the call sign KC5ZTD, until its expiration, which
    the FCC website lists as 2007.

    She remains, however, the longest-serving American in space -- and that
    record is expected to last quite some time.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    (NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC)

    **

    INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY A GLOBAL HAM EXPERIENCE

    JIM/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, YLs back here on Earth are turning on their rigs
    for a major celebration. We hear more from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED: March 8th once again marks the International Women's Day, a time to formally recognize the accomplishments of women around the world, be
    they political, academic, economic, social or cultural. It's a tradition
    that has its roots in a gathering more than 100 years ago with its
    earliest observers in Germany, Australia, Denmark, the US and Switzerland.

    For the past five years, the YL group of the Deutscher Amateur Radio
    Club, or DARC, has joined with Sophie F4DHQ to increase amateur radio participation in this global event. On that day, for four hours between
    18:00 UTC and 22:00 UTC, YLs are encouraged to be as active as possible
    on the air on 20m, 40m and 80m using SSB and CW. Yes, this is a contest.

    OMs are welcome to participate but - needless to say - contacts with YLs
    are worth more points.

    Hams in Germany should send their logs to Heike, DL3HD at dl3hd at darc
    dot de while participants from other countries should email their logs
    to Sophie F4DHQ at orange dot fr. Logs should be in chronological order
    and include date, time (in UTC), band, mode, call of QSO partner, name
    of the YL, RST and the points claimed. Submission deadline is May 1st.

    For more details and rules simply search for F4DHQ on qrz DOT com.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    (DARC)

    **
    HAMVENTION-BOUND? TEXT TO KEEP IN TOUCH

    JIM/ANCHOR: Are you heading to Hamvention this year? Neil Rapp WB9VPG
    tells us a new way to stay in touch - and plan for the trip.

    NEIL:The Dayton Hamvention has added yet another way to communicate the
    more time-sensitive types of information: text alerts. According to the hamvention.org web site, hams can sign up for text alerts from the
    official Hamvention staff and National Weather severe weather watch and warning service. To sign up for the text alert service, text
    Hamvention18 to 888777. Once again, that's Hamvention18 to the text
    number 888777. Once you successfully sign up, you'll receive a
    confirmation text welcoming you to the service. When I signed up a few
    days ago, 123 people had already registered. There's no charge for the service, but as always message and data rates may apply depending on
    your cell phone plan.

    Counting down the days until Hamvention, this is Neil Rapp, WB9VPG
    reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline.

    (DAYTON HAMVENTION)

    **

    NATIONAL RADIO CENTRE ADDS HOURS OF OPERATION

    JIM/ANCHOR: If you're in the UK, you're in luck: the National Radio
    Centre has more isiting hours. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH with the details.

    JEREMY: The National Radio Centre, an educational showcase at Bletchley
    Park in Buckinghamshire, will be open to visitors six days a week
    effective Monday the 2nd of April. The centre's hours of operation will
    be the same as the Bletchley Park museum, opening at 9:30 a.m., and
    closing at 4 p.m. in the winter and 5 p.m. in the summer.

    The centre traces the development of radio technology from the pioneers
    in the late 19th century. Best of all, there's a state-of-the-art
    amateur radio station GB3RS available to hams who want to get on the air.

    Admission is free to members of the Radio Society of Great Britain.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (RADIO SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    N5OZG repeater in New Orleans, Louisiana on Sundays at 8 p.m.

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS HARBOR HOPES FOR GOOD CONTACTS WITH FERRIES

    JIM/ANCHOR: What could be better than a day on board a boat? Try adding
    radio. John Williams VK4JJW tells us about some hams who are doing just
    that.

    JOHN'S REPORT: Amateurs in and around Sydney, Australia are getting
    ready for a field day without an actual field. For the third year,
    they're using ferries instead as they float through Sydney's harbor
    aboard one of the city's historic ferries on March 11.

    The UHF-VHF event is organized by the Waverley Amateur Radio Society
    VK2BV in the hopes that hams will use their handheld transceivers to
    make as many contacts as they can from the ferries or the wharves over
    the course of six hours, starting at 10 am local time. Contacts may be
    on simplex or through a repeater and in any mode the operator wishes.
    Mobile operators are encouraged to activate wharves and home-based hams
    are invited to work any of the harbor stations.

    Hams looking to operate from ferries and who have a New South Wales
    Transport Opal card have just the ticket - the maximum fare on a Sunday
    is $2.60 and it's money well spent for a day of smooth sailing.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (WAVERLEY AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY)

    **

    RADIOS BECOME THE TEACHERS IN SCOTTISH CLASSROOM

    JIM/ANCHOR: Radio doesn't just promise the magic of communication, it
    also offers the magic of education. Jeremy Boot G4NJH has this story
    from Scotland.

    JEREMY: For a group of young schoolchildren in Scotland, a lesson on
    basic electronics combined with a taste of amateur radio has brought
    history to life in a very personal way. The CQScotland group was
    wrapping up the final session in its four-part series of visits to two Hamilton Schools on behalf of the South Lanarkshire Council. The
    students, who had earlier explored electronic circuits and components,
    turned their attention on the 20th of February to Morse Code by building
    a simple sender and learning a little CW. Then Roy Kavannah GM4VKI of
    the GQRP club showed his collection of radio equipment that had been
    used in clandestine operations. The youngsters, already intrigued by the notion of secret codes, grew wide-eyed.

    The power of radio was also driven home by Tony Miles MM0TMZ, Scottish
    Region 1 manager of the Radio Society of Great Britain. He told the
    children that both his father and grandfather used equipment similar to
    Roy's whilst working for the UK clandestine special operations during
    both world wars.

    That's when one of the visiting parents stepped forward and declared he
    too had been a radio operator involved in such operations: He had been
    in the Soviet Navy!

    According to David Searle MM0HQD, the next series of workshops will be
    held for older students at the secondary school level.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (DAVID SEARLE MM0HQD)

    **

    SOTA ACTIVATORS PREPARE FOR LONG PATH PROPAGATION

    JIM/ANCHOR: Hams in Europe and the Asian Pacific region are planning to
    climb high and aim even higher, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: In Summits on the Air (SOTA), one of the more difficult and therefore challenging actions is to communicate from one summit to
    another usually using low power and a simple antenna at both ends. Add
    to that distance and poor propagation and the challenge is enormous.

    This will not deter over 30 SOTA activators who are planning to climb
    again this year to summits in Europe, Canada, South Africa, Australia,
    New Zealand and Japan on Saturday the 10th of March. In time for long
    path propagation between Europe and Asia Pacific.

    The summit to summit (or S-2-S) event will start around 0630 UTC � for
    Long Path between Europe and Australia over the following 90 minutes or
    so. Despite predicted poor propagation there are from time to time
    openings even at the bottom of the solar cycle.

    It is the first time that South Africa is joining in and while contacts
    from there to Europe are unlikely contacts over to Australia may take
    place.

    The organisers � Mike 2E0YYY, Andrew VK1AD and Ed DD5LP are hopeful that
    as well as several S2S contacts within the regions, contacts between
    regions will be possible. The best chance will be stations using CW
    however those using SSB will be trying hard as well.

    For anyone wanting to join the party, either as an activator on a summit
    or a chaser, home station, discussions can be found on the "reflector
    (dot) sota (dot) org (dot)uk" web site.

    These events are organised by individuals within the SOTA community, so
    it just shows how much fun can be had based simply on an idea, choosing
    a date and a loooong walk up a hill on possibly a freezing morning!

    This is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the World of DX, Dom, M1KTA, is operating as C6AKT from Eleuthera
    Island between the 8th and 17th of March. He is operating mainly QRP
    using CW on 80/40/20/15/10 meters. He expects to participate in the Commonwealth Contest on March 10th and 11th. Visit his QRZ page for his contest schedule. QSL via his call sign M1KTA, direct, by the Bureau, ClubLog's OQRS
    or LoTW.

    Listen for Hardy/DL3KWF and YL Rosel/DL3KWR operating as CT9/DL3KWF and CT9/DL3KWR respectively from Madeira between the 8th of March and the
    5th of April. They expect to spend the most time on 30/17/12 meters and
    will be using CW. You can also try listening for them on 60 meters. QSL
    via home call signs, direct, by the Bureau (also via E-mail request),
    eQSL or LoTW.

    Later this month, be listening for Hartwig, DL7BC, who will arrive in
    French Guiana around the 12th of March. He will be active as FY/DL7BC/p
    after that and most likely will return home on the 26th of March. Listen
    for him as TO2BC during the BARTG HF RTTY contest on March 17-18th and
    the CQWW WPX SSB on March 24th and 25th. Outside the contests, his call
    sign will remain FY/DL7BC/p on 40 through 10 meters. QSL via his home callsign, direct, by the Bureau, Club's OQRS or LoTW.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: APPLICATIONS OPEN FOR YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR

    JIM/ANCHOR: Finally, Amateur Radio Newsline would like to remind
    listeners that the nomination period has opened for this year's Bill
    Pasternak Memorial Young Ham of the Year Award. Although we accept
    nominations through May 31, don't wait too long to download your
    application from our website and get your documentation together to
    support your nominee. Young Ham candidates must be 18 or younger and be
    a resident of the United States, its possessions or any Canadian
    province. Application forms are available on our website arnewsline.org
    under the "YHOTY" tab. Please read the rules carefully. Applications are
    being accepted from now until May 31. The award will be presented in
    August at the Huntsville Hamfest in Huntsville Alabama. Join us in
    helping celebrate young, talented, community-minded amateurs by
    nominating a youngster you admire.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; David
    Searle MM0HQD); Dayton Hamvention; Deutscher Amateur Radio Club; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society;
    National Geographic; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; the Radio Society of
    Great Britain; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; the Waverley Amateur Radio Society; Wireless Institute of
    Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 16, 2018 11:48:12
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2107 for Friday, March 16, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2107 with a release date of Friday,
    March 16 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The FCC halts the planned launch of four
    satellites. A ham in the UK connects with the QSL card of an uncle who inspired him -- and wait, are those ZOMBIES on the air? All this and
    more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2107 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    FCC RESCINDS PERMISSION FOR SATELLITES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We open this week's newscast with the story of a setback
    for a Silicon Valley company that builds communications satellites. The
    FCC has rescinded permission for the firm's launch next month - citing
    serious reasons, as we hear from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN'S REPORT: The Federal Communications Commission has raised
    concerns about four small experimental satellites that were sent into
    space from India on Jan. 12. The four so-called SpaceBees are said to
    have been among the array of secondary CubeSats aboard the Polar
    Satellite Launch Vehicle. The FCC says these four satellites were
    unauthorized by the agency.

    The four communications satellites are a project of Swarm Technologies,
    a Silicon Valley startup manufacturer. They were designed to test out an Internet-of-Things communications network from space by communicating
    with ground stations and swapping data for as long as eight years.

    Swarm's application to operate them from space, however, was rejected by
    the FCC in December, with the agency citing concerns about their
    possible collision with other craft in space. The FCC noted that the
    miniature nature of the SpaceBees' technology would make them difficult
    to track to prevent such collisions.

    In an apparent move against the company, the FCC has since revoked
    permission it previously gave Swarm for its next four satellites,
    according to a CNBC report. Those satellites were to have been launched
    in just a few weeks in April.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.


    (IEEE, CNBC)

    **
    AT 8, SHE'S LICENSED TO LOVE RADIO

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Radio has a role in our lives, whether we're very young
    and discovering it or older and REdiscovering it. Jim Damron N8TMW
    introduces us to a YL in the throes of discovery.

    JIM: Seeing a pony-tailed second grader holding a directional antenna
    towards the sky is not exactly what you’d expect. But then Lacy Beckett W4LCY is not what you’d expect in a ham, either. This eight year old resident of Blacksburg, Virginia was shown demonstrating satellite-antenna-technique in an article in the Radford Virginia News
    Journal shortly after she acquired her Technician license this past
    January. But if you think that’s an accomplishment—wait! Lacy just upgraded to General two weeks ago. Her aunt and uncle drove her to
    Charleston, West Virginia—a 2 and a half hour ride—for the VE test
    session. I was honored to be a part of that VE team. Let me tell you,
    we were all cheering her on—quietly, of course. I talked to Lacy and
    she told me how her uncle Malcolm NB3T, and Aunt Jessica KW4GH, both
    Extra Class operators, helped her get interested in ham radio.

    Lacy: We were going out and we were working the satellites and I wanted
    to do it by myself, so I decided that I wanted to go and get my
    license…and I just wanted to use my own call sign and do it myself. I
    wanted to go on the ISS when I grow up and I thought it would be cool to
    talk to the ISS now.

    Jim: And why did you decide to upgrade to General so quickly?

    Lacy: If I got my General, I could just be on the big radio!

    Jim: I understand you’re now studying Morse Code?

    Lacy: Morse Code is really fun. It’s just pressing buttons. I
    probably shouldn’t be pressing buttons, but who cares!

    Jim: So Lacy, how would you explain ham radio to someone?

    Lacy: The way I would explain it is you have hard work at first but
    then after you pass the test, you get your license and then you can talk
    on the radio. It’s just like that!

    Jim: So are you going to upgrade to Extra soon?

    Lacy: I might do it later.

    Jim: But not next month?

    Lacy: Probably not!

    Jim: And what’s your favorite part of ham radio?

    Lacy: Field Day. That’s what’s my favorite part of the summer. Well, maybe the pool is!

    Jim: We can tell you, Lacy—pool or not—you’ve made a big splash in ham radio! Eight year old Lacy Beckett, W4LCY. For Amateur Radio Newsline,
    I’m Jim Damron, N8TMW.

    **
    FOR THIS HAM IT'S RADIO REDUX

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: There are also radio returnees, embracing what they once
    loved so long ago. Paul Braun WD9GCO caught up with a ham who's enjoying rediscovery.

    PAUL'S REPORT: As one who got involved in ham radio as a teenager and
    then went inactive for a few decades before getting back in, I am always interested in people with similar stories. I recently spoke with Alan Thompson, AJ6AR who was originally licensed as a Novice and then a
    Technician in 1962. I asked Thompson how he got started:

    THOMPSON: I'd have to owe a debt to my father. He owned a TV repair shop
    in Whittier, California and during the daytime, my mom was also working
    so he'd kind of babysit me in a way. They had a big shop in the back and they'd work on repairing radios and TV sets so I just kinda grew up with electronic gear around me.

    PAUL: And then, as is the case with many young boys, as our own Don
    Wilbanks, AE5DW said, he was overcome by fumes - car fumes and perfumes.
    His license eventually expired and he was out of amateur radio for 55
    years. And then, suddenly, it came back into his life:

    THOMPSON: I think what started it was that I do VSAT - Very Small
    Aperture Terminals for satellite internet. I started to look at the marketplace that's out there for disaster mitigation, emergency services
    and so on and I thought, "You know, there's a real need for this, to be
    able to have a mobile communications rig to be able to go out and
    provide internet communications with some of these remote fire camps and things like that," and of course with the hurricanes and all that that
    pretty well underscored that.

    So it was kind of a short step from there as I started to think about
    that type of communication and I'd think, "You know, I used to do this
    stuff. I used to do it with ham radio, used to talk all over the world
    and that was a great way to run out there in an emergency and throw
    something up there in a tree and get some communications when other
    types of communications simply wouldn't work. That just made me think,
    "You know, this is something that I love to do when I was a kid, I had a passion about it." I made the determination that I was going to go for
    it again only this time around I promised myself that I was going to
    just go straight to the top and get an Extra so I studied for all three
    exams to take them all at once, I didn't want to fool around and I
    didn't want to have any restrictions on my license capabilities.

    PAUL: Thompson is active in the El Dorado County Amateur Radio Club in California. He's enjoying exploring all that modern ham radio has to
    offer while getting comfortable in the shack again. His business is communications and electronics, so he's finding it a very good fit. For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO.

    **
    FINDING FAMILY TREASURE IN A QSL CARD

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Ham radio is the story of connections. Jeremy Boot G4NJH
    has this story of one connection that was deferred for decades - until now.

    JEREMY'S REPORT: Peter G0GPH credits his uncle Alan Haycock GD2HCX with opening his eyes and ears to ham radio. At 13, he first watched his
    uncle operate from his shack on 80 meters with a Collins 75A4 receiver
    and a homebrew transmitter into a trapped dipole that ran down into the garden. Uncle Alan also gave Peter's older brother an army receiver
    which Peter used for listening to 80 meters at night. That was the birth
    of Peter's love of radio - and of 80 meters. By the time Peter became
    licensed in the 1980s, his uncle had relocated to the Isle of Man and
    the two did get to sit together again to chat about radio. Then Uncle
    Alan, who had been in failing health, became a Silent Key.

    In February of this year, Peter was on 80 meters in a QSO with David
    G3ZPF and mentioned he was in search of anyone who might have known his
    late uncle. David, who maintains the website for The Radio Amateurs Old
    Timers Association, posted a message there. Within two days Mike G3TEV responded in a note. Mike, it seems, had been a good friend of Peter's
    uncle, starting in the 1960s. The men shared old radio parts, a love of angling and membership in an 80 meter net.

    As it turns out, Mike offered just what Peter had been seeking for so
    long: a chance to see his uncle's QSL card. Mike scanned and attached a
    copy of the card with the G2HCX call sign Alan Haycock had used when he
    lived in England. It was the highlight of his experience, Peter said.

    Sometimes when you're making the search of a lifetime, you don't need to
    turn to Scotland Yard - just a fellow amateur.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **

    BREAK HERE

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the Montgomery
    Amateur Radio Club's KV3B repeater in Rockville Maryland on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m. local time.

    **
    SIX METER BAND LAUNCHED IN AUSTRALIA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Australian hams in Central Victoria believe in magic -
    so much so that they're committed to a real magic net. Here's Graham
    Kemp VK4BB with those details.

    GRAHAM: Like many ham activities that get started over a casual cup of
    coffee, this next one is no exception. Graeme Knight VK3GRK recalls the morning chat that started it all among members of the Bendigo Amateur
    Radio and Electronics Club. They were keen to learn more about the
    so-called "magic band" and discussed the possibility of a weekly 6 metre
    net, experimenting on the band with different modes and different antennas.

    Facebook helped the group spread the word and, as Graeme told us at
    Newsline, before long, a group found themselves chatting with each other
    after their weekly Thursday evening 80 metre Net. Graeme tells us
    [quote]: "In keeping with true ham
    ingenuity, one member uses a simple 6 metre dipole made out of a pair of salvaged mop handles - and no they weren't made out of wood!" [endquote]

    The Net meets on 52.250 MHz Upper Side Band. It's only been on the air a
    short time and comprises a small group of local hams -- but who knows
    who may join them when the "magic band" opens? Look for them on the
    Facebook group page for the Central Victorian Amateur Radio Newsletter.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Graham Kemp VK4BB and I cannot leave this week’s broadcast without a HUGE thanks to Editor Caryn Eve Murray and
    the team of presenters on ARNewsline who passed on notes of condolence
    in the January loss of my YL Sharon. Thanks one and all and special
    thanks to the donation made in her memory to Australia’s Gallipoli
    Cancer Research organisation.

    (BENDIGO AMATEUR RADIO AND ELECTRONICS CLUB)

    **
    HAM TRAPPED ON TOWER WHILE SECURING ANTENNA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Hams are accustomed to being part of a rescue effort but
    not on the receiving end. Heather Embee KB3TZD explains.

    HEATHER: With a big storm getting ready to slam New England, William
    Welch K-one-I-O-C of Edgartown Massachusetts was only trying to make his
    ham radio antenna more secure. So he scaled his backyard tower and
    20-feet up got his sneaker caught. The electrician, who is 80 years old,
    was trapped.

    His wife Betty told the Martha's Vineyard Times that Fire Chief Alex
    Schaeffer was the first to arrive and a ladder truck showed up soon
    after. William was caught just below the apex and a large pine tree was blocking access to him. The firefighters gave him a helmet and a
    harness, which they fastened to the tower; after a few more maneuvers he
    was hoisted safely over the tree to the ground below, where firefighters
    and EMTs met him and he was taken by ambulance for observation. His wife
    told the newspaper later that he was fine and that the incident was, as
    she called it, a fluke. She said he has been climbing for most of his 80 years.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, K-B-3-T-Zed-D.

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Just a reminder to Newsline listeners to please follow
    safety procedures if you're climbing.

    (THE MARTHA'S VINEYARD TIMES)

    **
    HAM RADIO APPEARS ON TV's 'WALKING DEAD'

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Amateur radio just landed in another popular TV show.
    Mike Askins KE5CXP tells us how.

    MIKE's REPORT: Sure, ham radio can save lives but....that apparently
    doesn't count if you're a zombie. The March 11th episode of "The Walking Dead," a popular American TV show, seemed to try to make that point - at
    least for fans who tuned in that night. The episode marked the latest appearance ham radio has made in a TV series - this one being a popular post-apocalyptic drama.

    Two of the show's protagonists, known as Father Gabriel and Carson,
    discover an abandoned QTH with radio equipment and a script of messages designed to reassure anyone who can copy the operator's signal. The men
    also find a corpse on the ground - a zombified man who had somehow
    suffocated. He is presumed to have been the ham radio operator
    transmitting those messages.

    While this popular American TV show is about the un-dead, it's somehow a comfort that the script-writers recognize that ham radio is anything but
    left to the realm of zombies. The fact that the deceased ham was relying
    on good band conditions tells us this is definitely fiction. Stay tuned, perhaps there'll be a sequel. Not "The Walking Dead" but the
    "Push-To-Talking Dead."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP

    (BUSTLE.COM)

    **
    RADIO SCOUTS PLAN FOR SUMMER

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In Radio Scouting, summer plans are getting under way,
    as we hear from Bill Stearns NE4RD.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in Radio Scouting we have 1 activation of the
    K2BSA callsign, summer camps callsign reservations are starting to come
    in, and the executive committee seeks comments on some new and expanding initiatives.

    Chris Clark, W6CBC, will be activating K2BSA/6 at Camp Emerson
    Leadership Camp in Idyllwild, CA from March 24th to March 26th. This leadership camp will prepare new unit leaders with the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops curriculum. Chris always runs a great
    operation, and this will introduce and demonstrate Radio Scouting to
    these new leaders.

    We're starting to see several summer camp operations starting to appear
    on our calendar and over on our Scout Camps on the Air site. One that
    stands out so far due to the length of operation is William Coverdell
    WD0BC's operation as K2BSA/0 at Camp Geiger in St. Joseph, MO. They
    will be doing 6 weeks of Radio Merit Badge classes and activating the HF
    bands from their Scout owned station on camp that was built through 100% donations. In addition to the Merit Badge, they'll be introducing
    Scouts to the emergency aspect of Ham Radio and Morse Code. We look
    forward to seeing them on the air this summer as well as your summer camp!

    The executive committee of the K2BSA met earlier this month and talked
    about some new initiatives and expansions of current projects. These
    include developing a best practices guide to doing Radio Merit Badge at
    Summer Camp, develop an incentive program that increases interest and participation in getting Scout Camps on the Air,
    develop information on how to set up and operate a council level
    committee for radio scouting, and determine how to raise funds to
    support council/camp station construction. We're currently seeking
    input on these projects, so check out our latest member newsletter for
    more details.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **
    NOMINATE NEXT YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We remind all listeners that we are accepting
    nominations for the 2018 Bill Pasternak Young Ham of the Year award. If
    you know a promising young amateur who is 18 or younger and lives in the
    U.S., its possessions or Canada, please download a nomination form from
    our website, arnewsline dot org, under the YHOTY tab. Nominations are
    due May 31 and the award will be presented in August at the Huntsville Hamfest.

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In the World of DX, Will W0ZRJ and Bill KH6OO are active
    until March 17th in Tahiti using the call sign TX5X. They are operating
    on CW and in Digital modes. QSL via Club Log OQRS.

    The Italian DXpedition Team is in Cameroon until the 29th of March using
    the call sign TJ3TT. Be listening on 160 – 10m CW, SSB and Digital. QSL direct to I2YSB. For additional QSL information visit their web page at
    i2ysb dot com

    Listen for a small group led by Zorro JH1AJT from Bhutan. They will be
    there until the 18th of March activating their A5A callsign while they
    operate on SSB, CW and RTTY. QSL via Club Log OQRS.

    (IRTS)

    **

    KICKER: NO HANG-UPS HERE ABOUT ANTENNAS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We close with a story of a creative homebrew competition
    in Australia. It's a fun challenge -- that is, once you get the hang of
    it, in every sense of the word. Here's John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN: When it comes to amateur radio, have you ever felt like hanging it
    up? If you're in Central Victoria, that option just became a reality.
    Hams attending AntennaPalooza, a two-day club event next month just east
    of Dandenong, will be encouraged to enter an antenna-building
    competition using metal coat hangers.

    That's right, those very same things you've got in your closet keeping
    your jackets and shawls from getting wrinkled. Using a pair of pliers
    and some creativity, homebrew enthusiasts will get to grab as many as a
    dozen hangers and work their magic. Their goal? To create an antenna
    useful for the 2m or 70 cm band. Judges will score them on originality, attractiveness, gain and, of course, SWR. This is the first time in its five-year history that the AntennaPalooza gathering has set this kind of challenge. The event usually concentrates on more conventional antennas
    like dipoles, loops and beams. If this year's coat hangers are a
    success, perhaps next year they can move on to umbrella stands.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; Bendigo Amateur
    Radio and Electronics Club; BUSTLE.COM; CNBC; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and
    the Rain Report; the IEEE; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; K2BSA;
    the Martha's Vineyard Times; the Norwegian Radio Relay League; Ohio-Penn
    DX Bulletin; Peter Butterworth G0GPH; South African Radio League;
    Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Waverley
    Amateur Radio Society; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave;
    and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline.
    Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More
    information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official
    website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 16, 2018 15:59:58
    AMATEUR RADIO NEWSLINE YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR

    We are accepting nominations for the 2018 Bill Pasternak WA6ITF Young
    Ham of the Year award. If you know a promising young amateur who is 18
    or younger and lives in the U.S., its possessions or Canada, please
    download a nomination form from our website
    https://www.arnewsline.org/yhoty/ Nominations are due May 31 and the
    award will be presented in August at the Huntsville Hamfest.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org

    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the
    world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the
    internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12.
    We hope you enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related
    to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 7bit)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Sunday, March 18, 2018 21:47:48
    *Amateur Radio Newsline headlines for Ham Nation. March 21, 2018.*

    https://youtu.be/C8llr8md0Z8


    Amateur Radio Newsline headlines for Ham Nation. March 21, 2018.


    https://youtu.be/C8llr8md0Z8

    *Amateur Radio Newsline headlines for Ham Nation. March 21, 2018.*

    https://youtu.be/C8llr8md0Z8



    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org

    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the
    world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the
    internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12.
    We hope you enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related
    to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 7bit)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 23, 2018 11:17:50
    <*>[Attachment(s) from James KB7TBT included below]

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2108 for Friday, March 23, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2108 with a release date of Friday,
    March 23, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Alabama hams take to repeaters as tornadoes
    touch down. A ham in Colombia helps a German amateur in distress -- and
    does your pet know Morse Code? All this and more as Amateur Radio
    Newsline Report 2108 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    HAMS RESPOND AS TORNADOES TOUCH DOWN IN ALABAMA

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In our top story this week, tornadoes swept through Alabama
    here in the U.S. on Monday, March 19th, the night before the start of
    spring. Hams were on the air delivering information and assisting in
    rescue efforts, as we hear from Bobby Best WX4ALA.

    BOBBY: Ham radio operators across north and east Alabama assisted in
    passing ground truth storm reports to both the National Weather Service offices in Huntsville and Birmingham. Amateur radio operators and
    members of the North Alabama and Southern Middle Tennessee SKYWARN
    groups linked up multiple repeaters to cover that entire region and
    assisted the Huntsville NWS office with reports on multiple tornadoes
    that struck north Alabama. Amateur radio operators in east Alabama on
    the WB4GNA repeater atop Mount Cheaha, the tallest peak in the state,
    assisted not only with passing storm reports but also volunteer efforts
    in the wake of a major tornado that struck the city of Jacksonville
    Alabama as well as other portions of east Alabama late Monday night. As
    of last report late Monday night, volunteers were headed to Jacksonville
    from as far away as Anniston, Oxford and Birmingham Alabama to assist in rescue efforts. All in all, though, considering the fact that the storm prediction center had much of Alabama under a marginal risk for severe weather, things could have been much worse. For Amateur Radio Newsline reporting from Jacksonville Alabama I'm Bobby Best WX4ALA.

    ***

    AMSAT's HAMVENTION TEAM NEEDS VOLUNTEERS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Here's another opportunity for hams to be helpful - and
    it's even easier if you happen to be going to Hamvention this year.
    Stephen Kinford N8WB explains.

    STEPHEN: What are you doing May 17th through May 20th? If Hamvention is included in any of your plans on those days, you may want to think about helping out the AMSAT Hamvention Team, which is looking for help in
    setting up or staffing the AMSAT booth during the big event at the
    Greene County Fairground and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio.

    If you aren't sure how to assist at the booth when visitors stop by,
    AMSAT has plenty of Elmers to train you. If you just want to help with
    setup or tear-down, that's OK too.

    Contact Phil Smith W1EME if you're interested in being a part of the
    AMSAT presence in Ohio this year. Email him at w1eme at amsat dot org.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (SOUTHGATE, AMSAT)

    **

    GERMAN AMATEUR'S CALL FOR HELP GOES GLOBAL

    NEIL/ANCHOR: This next story is about a disabled radio operator and his
    cries for help that were heard - quite literally - around the world.
    Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Erding Radio Club member Lothar Fröhlich, whose call signs
    are DK8LRF and HK3JCL, was on the air from his QTH in Colombia, South
    America recently talking to friends in New York and Germany, when he
    heard a voice call out repeatedly. At first he thought it was someone
    was trying to break into the QSO but then he realized it was a ham in distress. He recognized the voice - this was an amateur in Dingden on
    the German-Dutch border, a ham with whom he enjoys ragchews often.

    The ham, who is disabled and relies on a wheelchair, had fallen and was
    home alone. His radio was on, fortunately with the transmitter in "VOX"
    mode so his cries activated the microphone Lothar called for any German
    hams who could copy him, asking them to please notify local police.
    Then, using EchoLink, he reached a repeater in Isen, east of Munich. A
    ham in Eichstätt in Bavaria responded and also called police who
    responded immediately.

    Ham radio had made distance vanish. The ham in distress was 5 metres
    from the microphone but his call went through anyway -- and those who
    assisted astounded the police by the fact that the call was started by a
    ham in Colombia on the other side of the world.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **
    STANDING WHERE WARTIME HISTORY WAS MADE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Any ham radio operator can appreciate the power of code,
    even if they themselves have never touched a straight key. One exhibit
    in the UK has taken the appeal of code several steps further, as we hear
    from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: A new exhibit at Bletchley Park doesn't just show an important
    part of World War Two history the way it happened - the exhibit has been established on the very site WHERE that history took place. Stepping
    inside the Bletchley Park building known as Hut 11A, visitors will be
    able to learn the story of the Bombe machines located there to help
    Allied intelligence crack the mysteries of the Enigma code and decrypt
    Nazi messages during the Second World War. The now-historic team behind
    that effort comprised Alan Turing, Gordon Welchman and serveral others.
    The exhibit invites museum visitors to [quote] "discover the truth and
    stand where they stood." [endquote]. The exhibit is a permanent one and
    so hopefully there will be plenty of time for that.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (RSGB)

    **

    NETS OF NOTE: THE COLORADO ASTRONOMY NET

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Our occasional series, Nets of Note, looks at how and why
    hams gather on the air to share viewpoints and interests. This week
    we're introduced to the Colorado Astronomy Net by Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: As the Newsline office space nerd, this week's Net of Note
    combines two of my favorite things - space and ham radio. Burness
    Ansell, KI0AR, has been hosting the weekly Colorado Astronomy Net for
    over 20 years now. Ansell explains how it started:

    ANSELL: I've always been interested in astronomy and I started this net
    back in 1996. I just wanted to combine radio with astronomy and share my
    love of astronomy and looking at the night skies and how it could also
    relate to amateur radio.

    PAUL: The net covers basically anything having to do with astronomy,
    according to Ansell:

    ANSELL: I usually start off with phases of the moon and stuff like that
    - where the planets are through the week, rise and set times, any other planetary special events like conjunctions or photo ops. And then do
    some JPL bulletins or whatever sources I can find about what's up with
    the night skies, what's going on in the world of astronomy or cosmology
    - things like that. Radio astronomy, especially. If I can find clips of stellar noise or pulsars, I've done that before.

    PAUL: The hams that check into the net are from all over the country and
    have varied interests. Ansell explained:

    ANSELL: We have one member that's doing observational astronomy looking
    at galaxies. We have one teacher who lives up in Berthoud who does radio astronomy with his students at the Little Thompson Observatory up there
    and he's tracking meteor scatter. He's got students now pointing their
    dishes at the center of our galaxy and trying to record radio waves from there.

    PAUL: If you'd like to join in, you can find the schedule, repeater information, and the Echolink and Allstar nodes at Ansell's website at www.KI0AR.com/astro.html. You can also subscribe to his monthly
    astronomy newsletter from the site.

    So, keep one hand on the mic, and your eyes on the stars and check out
    the Colorado Astronomy Net every Tuesday night. For Amateur Radio
    Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO.


    NEIL/ANCHOR: If you have an interesting Net to share with us, write us
    at newsline at arnewsline dot org (newsline@arnewsline.org)


    **
    NOMINATE THE NEXT 'YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR'

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    Candidates for the award must be 18 or younger and reside in the US (or
    its possessions) or Canada. Nominees must hold a valid Amateur Radio
    license issued by the US or Canada. The award will be presented at the Huntsville Hamfest in Huntsville Alabama in August.

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including the
    N2JDW repeater in New York City on Monday nights at 8 local time, just
    before the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Service Net.


    **

    INDONESIAN HAMS ARE ON BOARD FOR ON-LINE TESTING

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Big news for license applicants in Indonesia. Tests are
    being given differently now, as we hear from Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    JASON'S REPORT: When it comes down to doing things online, more and more countries appear to be climbing on board - particularly with respect to conducting ham radio license exams.

    Indonesian hams in the Bulukumba district of South Sulawesi province are
    now taking their test - which was to be March 24th and 25th - and the
    move was credited by officials there are showing authorities' commitment
    to making things easier and more transparent. This is a "first" for the
    nation and has been a change welcomed by the Amateur Radio Organization
    of Indonesia, known as ORARI, as well as those sitting for the test.

    According to authorities, the move to e-Licensing will allow for greater automation in the process and provide great savings by making the
    process paperless. The ORARI said that following the March testing,
    other regions are expected to follow suit, including the province of
    South Sumatra.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We received word late that two nine-year-olds were among
    those to sit for the exam and they successfully answered the questions. Ordinarily that would make them eligible for their licenses. In
    Indonesia, however, youngsters under the age of 14 are not permitted to
    hold an amateur license. Are other reforms in the works? Newsline will
    let you know what we learn.

    (SOUTHGATE, ORARI)

    **

    THELMA SOUPER MEMORIAL CONTEST CANCELLED

    NEIL/ANCHOR: A annual popular contest hosted by YLs in New Zealand has
    had to be scrapped this year, as we hear from Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    JIM'S REPORT: There's disappointing news for fans of the annual Thelma
    Souper Memorial Contest held annually in April. This year's event has
    been cancelled, as reported by the New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters. The popular competition, which typically runs for two
    evenings, honors Thelma Souper ZL2JO, who became a Silent Key in
    December of 1977. Thelma was a founder of the New Zealand Women Amateur
    Radio Operators and served as its secretary. The contest was begun in
    1976 as the WARO contest but it was renamed in 1978 at the group's
    annual general meeting. No additional details were given about the cancellation or its prospects for next year.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen, ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)

    **
    RADIO'S WORLD CUP COINCIDES WITH 'THAT OTHER ONE'

    NEIL/ANCHOR: If you're a good sport about radio and you also happen to
    be a good sport about soccer, you'll want to give extra attention to the
    World Radio Team Championships in Germany, as we hear from Ed Durrant
    DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: It's all coming together, they're all coming together! What
    are we talking about? - Well the World Cup of Amateur Radio - the World
    Radio Team Championships in Wittenberg, Germany this year from July 11th through 17th.

    There's a full program surrounding the 24 hours of actual competition on
    the Saturday and Sunday. The opening ceremony on Thursday has the
    Introduction of all competitors, referees and sponsors and the closing ceremony on Monday has the award presentations. Both take place in the historic Exerzierhalle hall from the 19th. Century, with dancing late
    into the night after the closing ceremony at the nearby "Stadthaus." Six hundred attendees are expected at the opening and 900 at the closing
    ceremony.

    If Germany wins that "other World Cup" - the soccer one, on Sunday the
    15th of July - there could be dancing in the streets!

    YASME is sponsoring the "Ham Widows Ball" on the Wednesday evening which brings together spouses of competitors and referees.

    To book a place at the opening or closing ceremony or to book a trip
    around the region the website booking.wrtc2018.de/en/ is now available.
    For those not able to get to Wittenberg in July as a competitor, judge,
    helper or visitor, there are several on-air award schemes that will run
    during the event.

    WAWRTC - Worked all WRTC stations.

    WRTC Sprint - work all of the WRTC stations in the shortest time you can
    - in less than 24 hours.

    Most QSOs - up to 630 QSOs are possible - how many can you manage?

    WRTC Distance challenge - based not only on the number of QSOs but also
    the total of all the distances.

    One competition that is already running is VOTA or Volunteers on the
    air. Collect the Volunteers allocated numbers to enter this award
    scheme. There are about 300 current volunteers worldwide so they
    shouldn't be too difficult to find on the air!

    To find details on anything to do with WRTC 2018 and to keep up-to-date
    with what's happening go to the WRTC2018.de website where you can also
    still donate to help support the event.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In the world of DX, be listening for Sergio, IZ3NXC,
    operating as 9A8NXC from Pag Island from March 30th through April 2nd.
    You can find him on 80/40/20/15/10 meters using SSB and the Digital
    modes. QSL via ClubLog's OQRS or via IK3GES direct.

    Members of the Curva do Rio Group will be using the call sign PR2CI from Couves Island between April 6th to 8th. Find them on 80-10 meters using
    CW, SSB and the Digital modes. QSL via the Bureau, ClubLog's OQRS or
    LoTW. For direct, via PY2AE with self-addressed envelope and two dollars
    in U.S. currency.

    In Belize, find Victor, WB0TEV, active as V31VP until the 27th of March
    on 80-10 meters. He plans to operate some RTTY with a special session
    focusing on Asia starting around 2200z on March 26th. Send QSLs to V31VP
    via WB0TEV, direct, by the Bureau or ClubLog's OQRS. No LoTW or eQSL.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: PUTTING THE 'HAM' IN HAMSTER

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Our last story this week is about a talented and tiny pet -
    and it may at long last shed light on why it's no coincidence that the
    first three letters of "hamster" spell "ham." With that story, here's
    Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: Some people enjoy the sound of Morse code. Some don't. But what
    about our little furry friends? Has anyone asked them? Kurt Zoglmann,
    AD0WE, had wanted to learn Morse as a child, but didn't really pursue it
    until recently. He then discovered something strange during his practice sessions.

    ZOGLMANN: You know, I noticed after a while that our little hamster,
    Waffles, she'd normally wake up around 11 o'clock at night but she would
    wake up early whenever I would start practicing. I didn't really think
    too much of it. I noticed that when they're happy or excited that they
    have a tendency to chirp, so I started putting two and two together that
    the frequency of the chirp was not too far away from my preferred
    frequency on practicing with Morse code. (1:05)

    PAUL: Zoglmann couldn't actually ask Waffles what she was thinking, but
    has a theory: (:05)

    ZOGLMANN: From little Waffles' perspective, I think she probably was
    mistaking it for a nearby hamster that was just extraordinarily happy
    and she wanted to know what all that was about.

    PAUL: Zoglmann would have been tempted to just write it off as a strange behavioral quirk in Waffles. However:

    ZOGLMANN: After her passing, we decided to get another hamster. Because
    the same behavior started to happen, I was like, "This is just so weird
    to be a coincidence!" so that inspired me to write a cute story to try
    to capture the call of hamster being Morse code.

    PAUL: Zoglmann figured that he should have some illustrations to go with
    the story, so he asked his husband, an artist, to draw a few. He ended
    up with a painting of a hamster working a straight key.

    Who knows? Given enough training, perhaps the new hamster can help out
    during contests. Will probably need a much smaller key, though. Or a teeny-tiny paddle. How would that be logged? AD0WE/H for "hamster"?

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun, WD9GCO.

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Just a postscript here -- next time you're in a QSO with
    another ham using CW, before you accuse their station of having a
    "chirp" in the signal, it pays to ask first if their hamster needs
    adjusting.

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; the Amateur Radio Organization of Indonesia; the BBC; CQ Magazine; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the IARU; the Irish Radio Transmitters Society; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Radio Society
    of Great Britain; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio
    Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our
    listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:35:52
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:36:54
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:38:02
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:39:02
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:39:58
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:41:00
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:41:48
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:42:40
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, March 30, 2018 02:43:26
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 for Friday, March 30, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2109 with a release date of Friday,
    March 30, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Look out: a Chinese satellite is headed back to
    Earth. Samuel Morse's birthday festivities are in the works in New York
    -- and in New Zealand, hams help discover a missing woman's remains. All
    this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2109 comes your way right
    now.

    **
    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    NEW ZEALAND HAMS ASSIST IN SEARCH FOR MISSING WOMAN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Our top story this week comes from New Zealand, where a
    dozen or so members of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Group
    joined in a weekend effort to find a woman who'd been missing for three months. Jim Meachen ZL2BHF tells us how it unfolded.

    JIM: It began as a training exercise by members of the Amateur Radio
    Emergency Communications Group, part of the New Zealand Association of
    Radio Transmitters - but the drill turned real after its participants discovered the body of a young woman who had been missing since
    December. More than 100 Land Search and Rescue professionals had been
    deployed in the Ashley River area near Rangiora, just north of
    Christchurch. AREC section leader Richard Smart ZL4FZ was one of them.
    Richard says the team also had help from vehicles best described as "communications hubs on wheels:"

    RICHARD: The vehicles are multi-role and capable of operating on several bands. They are already configured and set up with the radios
    established in the right places physically. They have computing
    facilities made available: We have portable laptops and all the network cabling is in the vehicles. As much as possible when we arrive we
    basically stop the vehicle, establish a power connection, establish a
    network connection and turn the radios on. As far as pragmatically
    possible we are ready to operate.

    JIM: The hams were in constant contact with one another over amateur frequencies and with New Zealand Police and Land Search and Rescue team members on their emergency channel on the weekend of March 24th and
    25th. Their discovery of Emma Beattie's body on the riverbank that
    second day underscored the value that amateurs' skills bring to such
    scenes, time and again.

    RICHARD: There is a core team in Christchurch of people who respond to
    police search and rescue requests and they train regularly once a month
    so that they are ready. Part of that training is an acceptance and understanding of being needed for both search and rescue exercises and
    the real event.

    JIM: Getting it right is always important - even when the shared effort ultimately turns up a tragic result.

    RICHARD: We made it work and I think the results were acceptable and
    achieved what we set out to do. But there are certainly some points
    we'll go back over on our training nights and look into and see if we
    can do it either easier, faster or better for next time.

    JIM: Unfortunately, said Richard, there is often a next time. For
    Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (NZART)


    **

    SATELLITE'S RETURN: LOOK OUT BELOW!

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Look out below! There's a satellite headed back to Earth
    and hams may want to keep an eye - and an ear - out for it, as we hear
    from Lloyd Colston KC5FM.

    LLOYD: Tiangong-1 will join the ranks of satellites such as SkyLab and
    Mir when it re-enters Earth's atmosphere around Easter Weekend. The 8.5
    ton satellite from China is expected to disintegrate upon re-entry but
    pieces may reach the surface of the Earth. Skywarn volunteers may be
    watchful for the satellite using the information pinned to the top of
    twitter dot com slash kc5fm (twitter.com/kc5fm)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Lloyd Colston KC5FM looking up for you.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One benefit for hams would be a nice meteor trail for VHF
    and UHF weak signal opening on meteor scatter.

    **
    ON SAMUEL MORSE'S FRONT PORCH

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Some big birthday plans in New York's Hudson Valley don't
    involve candles and cake, but you can expect perhaps a straight key or
    two, as we hear from Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    MIKE'S REPORT: Samuel Morse is turning 227 years of age this year! Well,
    OK, he was born on April 27 in 1791 so he's long gone but anyone who's
    ever known the thrill of CW knows his legacy is a big part of amateur
    radio life. The QSY Society in Poughkeepsie (PO-KIPPSY) New York will
    mark his birthday by visiting the estate in their community that had
    been his home and will be giving a CW demonstration - with real QSOs
    taking place - for four hours.

    Scott Dunlavey W2NTV told Amateur Radio Newsline [quote]: "We try to put
    on a good show. It is really fun to see the joy on one's face who has
    been away from the hobby for a while." [endquote] People don't forget
    code, he said, even if they've been away from it for a while.

    People don't forget Samuel Morse either - or his birthday - so if you're
    in the Hudson Valley, New York area on April 28, stop by Locust Grove
    and raise a fist - gently of course - in honor of the birthday boy. If
    you can't get to New York, work the special event station. Be listening
    for the call sign W2M -- in CW of course.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (THE QSY SOCIETY)

    **
    AUSTRALIAN HAMS GET THEIR DAYS IN THE SUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Wireless Institute of Australia sees bright days ahead
    for its annual convention and meeting - bright because, as we hear from
    Graham Kemp VK4BB, it's all happening in Queensland, the Sunshine State.

    GRAHAM'S REPORT: How do you make a boring old AGM interesting? Well,
    start by holding it somewhere that is fun for the whole family, like the SeaWorld resort on the Gold Coast of Australia's Sunshine State,
    Queensland. Then add some presentations on ground breaking technologies
    and of course some good food along with a free Blues Music Festival.

    That's what the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society have organised for the Wireless Institute of Australia for their 2018 Radio and Electronics convention and AGM, which will run from the 18th to the 20th of May this
    year.

    The organisers have just added two important presenters to the mix:
    David Rowe (VK5DGR) is the leading expert for Digital Voice on the HF
    bands and will be talking about his creation CODEC2 which powers the
    FreeDV mode. David, a father of three, who was first licensed at age 14
    in 1981 works part time as a senior engineer for a defence signal
    processing company. He writes a popular blog that is read by 70,000
    people each month, drives a home-brew Electric Car and also enjoys bike
    riding and sailing (both while operating a 70cm HT).

    Another world leader in his area, Tim (VK5ZT) was first licensed in 1971
    as VK5ZTD while still a Post Master General's department trainee who
    went on to careers in the private and public sectors including work in
    the defence industry. Tim been engaged to present his experiments in
    optical communication on “nanowaves” or to be precise 474 terahertz
    (i.e. light). As well as providing tips for solutions that are easy to
    build, he will also cover the current ‘state of the art’ and theorise
    over what can be achieved in prospective future projects.

    The Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society is a busy group and in parallel to arranging this event for the WIA they also have been issued with the
    VI4GAMES special event callsign for use during the upcoming Gold Coast Commonwealth Games between April 4th. and 15th. There will be a rota of operators around the South east of Queensland using the call sign to
    publicise the games which will involve athletes from seventy one British Commonwealth nations.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **

    QSOs WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM THEIR FRIENDS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Another kind of gathering - a global gathering of friends -
    is in the works for April 18. Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN's REPORT: On April 18, World Amateur Radio Day will mark that day
    when the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris in 1925.
    There was, of course, no IRLP or EchoLink back then, but there's a group
    of relative newcomers operating on the Western Reflector feeling just as festive over marking the occasion. The World Radio Network/World
    Friendship Net is preparing for its fourth year as participants in the
    global event and it's making sure that all hams - even those who can't
    get on the HF bands - have a chance to get in on the action. The World Friendship Net will operate nonstop for 12 hours starting on 1600 UTC on
    April 18 and for the first year will be using a special event call sign
    W2W. Those who participate will get a commemorative special event QSL
    card this year as well.

    Organizer John De Ryke (duh RIKEY) said last year's success has
    encouraged even more participation this year. The 2017 participation
    logged 426 check-ins with 45 international stations representing 23
    different countries. This year's 12-hour net will be run by 8 different
    net controllers around the clock.

    Node 9251 is located on the World Conference Server and part of the
    Nevada Amateur Radio Repeater network.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (JOHN DE RYKE W2JLD)

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    NL7RQ repeater of the Cabot STARS Club in Cabot Arkansas on Sundays at
    7:30 p.m local time.

    **

    DXing BY FOOT

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For one ham in the UK, the journey of 560 miles begins with
    a single step - and, of course, an HT. Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us more.

    JEREMY: Sunday the 1st of April marks the day that Paul Truswell M3WHO
    takes the first of many, many steps along a 900-mile walk across Great Britain. Paul and his 2m transceiver are making the trek in support of Fibromyalgia Action UK, a national charity. This is truly the equivalent
    of DXing for walkers, though the Macclesfield, Cheshire resident has
    done previous challenges, including a 560-mile journey in 2016 that took
    him from Lowestoft west to Land's End for the benefit of his local
    Scouting group.

    This year's trip will begin at the English Channel at Dover and finish - eventually - at the lighthouse in Britain's northwest corner at Cape
    Wrath. He's dubbed the trip Magnetic North acknowledging its direction.

    According to published reports, it will take him about 50 days to finish
    if he averages 18 or so miles a day and gives himself some rest time in between. He's hoping to raise 10,000 pounds - the equivalent of about
    fourteen thousand U.S. dollars

    Richard Newstead, G3CWI, will be providing logistic support to Paul from
    his motor home using the 2 metre FM band during the last, most remote
    stages of the walk, between Oykel Bridge and Cape Wrath, across the
    north-west highlands of Scotland.

    As he wrote on his website: [QUOTE]: "Easter Day and April Fool's day -
    what could be better?!!" [ENDQUOTE] Perhaps a glorious finish and some
    QSOs along the way, especially with Richard Newstead G3CWI from his
    motor home.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (SOUTHGATE ARC)


    **
    A LIGHTHOUSE WITH 2 REASONS TO SHINE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: One of the registered stations for International Marconi
    Day is a lighthouse with two reasons to shine. Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT
    brings us those details.

    CARYN: International Marconi Day is as close as we can get to having our
    own amateur radio holiday. The annual event is held on the Saturday
    closest to Guglielmo Marconi's birthday and is organized by the Cornish
    Radio Amateur Club GX4CRC. This year stations in Ireland, Austria,
    Germany and Australia will be among the registered stations
    acknowledging that we are all beneficiaries of this radio pioneer's
    legacy. In Atlantic Canada, activation of the Cape Bear Lighthouse on
    Prince Edward Island as VY2PLH brings extra significance to the 24-hour period.

    GEORGE: Well Cape Bear has the distinction of being the only Marconi
    station in Canada that was in contact with the Titanic when that ship
    was in distress. Now people may say that Cape Race in Newfoundland also
    made a contact which they did but at the time Newfoundland and Labrador weren't a part of Canada. They didn't join until 1949 so technically
    Cape Bear is the only Canadian station to have had contact with the
    Titanic.

    CARYN: That was George Dewar VY2GF, one of the hams operating from this historic site, which includes a small museum dedicated to the Titanic.
    George said he and Bernie Cormier VE9BGC and the other operators have a
    pretty good idea of who they want to contact.

    GEORGE: Just about anybody and everybody! Well, it would be nice to
    contact stations at other historical Marconi sites.

    CARYN: Will that include GB4IMD, the special event callsign being used
    by the Cornish radio amateur club? They are, after all, the creators of
    the event and will be giving out awards.

    GEORGE: Well I hope so. They put a tremendous amount of effort into
    organizing this.

    CARYN: If you want the Cape Bear Lighthouse VY2PLH in your log, be
    listening on Saturday the 21st of April from 0000 UTC to 2359 UTC.
    They'll be operating on SSB and digital modes.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **

    FINE-TUNING THE DETAILS FOR WORLD RADIO TEAM CHAMPIONSHIP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Excitement is building for the World Radio Team
    Championship as Ed Durrant DD5LP tells us.

    ED: With just about 100 days to the World Radio Team Championship 2018
    near Wittenberg in Germany, the organisation is running with the
    expected German precision, with everything on schedule to be up and
    running from July 12th to the 16th.

    The competitors have been "honing their skills," using their intended equipment in contests such as the WPX SSB contest last weekend and
    others, so that nothing should go wrong with the transmitting and
    receiving equipment that the competitors provide themselves. The support infrastructure is taken care of by the organisers and no problems are
    expected there, although spares of everything are also in the warehouse
    "just in case."

    Almost all hotels around Wittenberg are now full with reservations for
    the competitors and their families, the VIPs, the judges, the visitors
    and those of the helpers who aren't self sufficient in their own motor
    homes or similar.

    As mentioned in my last piece, award schemes will run alongside the
    event so that all amateurs everywhere can be a part of the event. The volunteers on the air award is already running and will run all year -
    how many WRTC Volunteers have you contacted so far?

    The excitement is growing, everything is being double checked but this
    "World Cup of Amateur Radio" - which incidentally coincides with the
    Soccer World Cup, looks set to be the best WRTC yet. Run with German efficiency and amateur radio camaraderie.

    One hundred days out finances are at about 97 percent - so anyone who
    would still like to make a donation, be it large or small is very
    welcome to do so through the website at WRTC 2018 (dot) D E.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    NOMINATE THE NEXT ╥YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR╙

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind you again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award is an honor for radio operators 18
    and younger who hold licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May 31. If you know of a deserving candidate who has
    been of service to the community or helped improve amateur radio for
    those in the hobby, submit his or her name for consideration. You can
    find the nomination forms on our website at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab. The award is named in memory of
    Amateur Radio Newsline founder Bill Pasternak WA6ITF.

    **

    KICKER: THEORETICAL PHYSICS MEETS REAL RADIO - MAYBE?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally - we ask - Wouldn't we all like to work only one
    day a year? Well, Newsline's April 1st roving correspondent Pierre
    Pullinmyleg has that dream job - with us! Here he is again this year.
    Pierre?

    PIERRE's REPORT: Among zee many unpublished papers left behind by the
    late Stephen Hawking was a groundbreaking document describing his
    little-known discoveries in radio. Ziss theoretical physicist believed
    in Parallel Universes but not many realize he had also discovered
    Parallel Radio Frequencies. Now sources have said to me, "Pierre
    Pullinmyleg - because zat is my name! - Stephen Hawking believed that at
    the time ziss universe of ours was born, multiple universes actually
    came into being and with them - and ziss explosion, she created all
    kinds of amateur radio bands. But zey are, you see, all parallel. So now
    to operate QRP in ziss parallel world, you simply operate barefoot at 1 kilowatt. Ah, but zee real superpowers of the ham world, their signal
    steps on everyone else when zey turn on their linear de-amplifiers and
    key their mic with their ear-splitting super power of 1 mW. And to use
    CW? In zee code created by the famous Manuel Zorse, you send zee dots as dashes and zee dashes as zee dots. Zere is no need to have a good fist
    for sending zee code, you simply sit on your straight key and send your message with your - excuse my French - DERRIERE. Antennas? Mais non,
    chéri!! So unneeded, so passe. Just sink a grounding rod, hook up and
    tune up, no SWR to worry about! So you see? Thanks to theoretical
    physics, parallel bands will create a Big Bang of sorts for all of us.
    You go first.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, this is Pierre Pullinmyleg in zee world of Parallel Frequencies saying "37" for now.

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Gold
    Coast Amateur Radio Society; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; John De Ryke W2JLD; New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters; Ohio-Penn DX
    Bulletin; the QSY Society; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:17:56
    Hello,

    The owner of the arnewsline Yahoo Group has moved the group to Groups.io, a
    new Groups service. You have been subscribed to the new group using your
    email address arnewsline@ftn.wpusa.dynip.com. The name of the new group is ARNewsline, and messages can be sent to it at ARNewsline@groups.io. The group homepage is located at https://groups.io/g/ARNewsline.

    Groups at Groups.io are similar to Yahoo Groups, but we have several new features and we encourage you to explore the Groups.io website. If you have never registered with Groups.io before, your account will not have a password set yet. To log in, you can use the 'Email me a link to login' button to have
    a link emailed to you that will let you log into the website.

    You do not have to do anything to continue being a member of this group. If
    you do not wish to be a member of ARNewsline, click here: https://groups.io/g/ARNewsline/leave/2103143/629458047/xyzzy?direct=1 and you will be unsubscribed immediately.

    NOTE: You have also been added to the Groups.io updates group. The updates group occasionally sends out updates about the Groups.io service.

    If you have any questions, please contact support@groups.io.

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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:18:10
    Hello,

    Welcome to the ARNewsline@groups.io group at Groups.io, a free, easy-to-use email group service. Please take a moment to review this message.

    To learn more about the ARNewsline@groups.io group, please visit https://groups.io/g/ARNewsline

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    To see and modify all of your groups, go to https://groups.io

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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
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    Thank you and good day!

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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Saturday, April 14, 2018 10:32:52
    Thank you, groups.io are excellent.
    73s to all
    MikeUK

    From: ARNewsline <ARNewsline@groups.io>
    To: miketerry73@btinternet.com
    Sent: Saturday, 14 April 2018, 15:16
    Subject: You have been added to ARNewsline@groups.io

    Hello,The owner of the arnewsline Yahoo Group has moved the group to
    Groups.io, a new Groups service. You have been subscribed to the new group using your email address miketerry73@btinternet.com. The name of the new
    group is ARNewsline, and messages can be sent to it at ARNewsline@groups.io. The group homepage is located here.Groups at Groups.io are similar to Yahoo Groups, but we have several new features and we encourage you to explore the Groups.io website. If you have never registered with Groups.io before, your account will not have a password set yet. To log in, you can use the 'Email
    me a link to login' button to have a link emailed to you that will let you
    log into the website.You do not have to do anything to continue being a
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    ***

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    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Sunday, April 15, 2018 03:17:58
    In 2001 Bill WA6ITF/SK created the Yahoo group for Amateur Radio
    Newsline, as you have seen the Amateur Radio Newsline Yahoogroup has now
    been moved to groups.io.

    For the past 2 weeks i have sent out the weekly report and Yahoo
    rejected it with mutable failures, I tried to resend and change things
    and nothing worked. Yahoogroups from what i understand is no longer
    supported and has been sold off..

    Email groups may be outdated at this point but we still have over 200
    members on the email list and for that reason alone i have changed to a
    more reliable service.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the
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    We hope you enjoyed it!

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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Sunday, April 15, 2018 03:33:30
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2111 for Friday, April 13, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2111 with a release date of Friday,
    April 13 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The ARRL's seeking new leadership. The radio
    world loses a beloved historian -- and ham radio's back in the movies.
    All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2111 comes your way
    right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    SEARCH FOR NEW CEO AT ARRL

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We begin this week with word that the search is on to
    fill the vacant top spot at the ARRL. Neil Rapp WB9VPG tells us more.

    NEIL: The search has officially begun for the next chief executive
    officer of the American Radio Relay League. According to ARRL.org, applications are now being accepted for the position until May 31. The
    CEO will oversee the day-to-day operations of the organization. ARRL has 159,000 members, 90 paid employees, and an annual budget of $15 million. Applicants must have at least a bachelor's degree, 10 years of
    management experience and have demonstrated the ability to provide
    effective leadership. The ARRL prefers candidates who have a master's
    degree and 15 years of experience and are active amateur radio
    operators. Preferred candidates should have been an ARRL member for at
    least four years.

    Barry Shelley, N1VXY, was named CEO after the March 2nd retirement of
    Tom Gallager, NY2RG, who served in the position for 2 years. Shelley had
    been the chief financial officer at ARRL for nearly 30 years, and plans
    to retire himself within the next 18 months.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG

    (ARRL)

    **
    HAM HONORED FOR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT IN OKLAHOMA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In Oklahoma, one ham has won top honors for taking his emergency preparedness to a new level. We hear more from Mike Askins
    KE5CXP.

    MIKE: It was not quite a year ago that a deadly tornado ripped through
    Elk City, Oklahoma after leaving the Texas panhandle. While no one can
    ever be fully prepared for what devastation follows such events, the
    skill and dedication of one amateur has won him recognition from his
    peers. Lonnie Risenhoover N5CH has been named emergency management
    director of the year for the Southwest Oklahoma Region. Lonnie is the emergency management director for Beckham County but those who nominated
    him pointed out that his hard work doesn't stop where the county line ends.

    Tillman County Emergency Manager Randy Hasley nominated Lonnie for his
    work to safeguard residents most particularly during the tornado that
    swept through the region in May 2017. He noted that Lonnie was already
    hard at work well before the tornado arrived, coordinating with first responders and partner agencies. He remained active with search and
    rescue in the aftermath.

    We here at Newsline congratulate Lonnie for a job well done.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    **
    ROYAL TREATMENT FOR A DOUBLE CELEBRATION

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Hams in the UK are getting ready to mark an important
    double anniversary. Jeremy Boot G4NJH has that story.

    JEREMY: An anniversary celebration doesn't get much better than this:
    The Royal Air Force Amateur Radio Society is marking the 80th year since
    its formation and on April 1st, the Royal Air Force itself marked its centenary. If ever there were an occasion for a special event station,
    this is it. So be listening for the call sign GB100RAF anywhere and
    everywhere you can. Operators intend to mark the double commemoration at
    as many locations and events as is possible. If you are fortunate enough
    to make contact with the station and want to receive one of the RAF100
    QSL cards, you'll need to send your card first with a postal fee, if you
    are a DX station, or a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you are
    local. If you miss the chance to work this station in April, don't
    worry: operation continues well into the summer months and you have
    twice as many reasons to try for a contact. For more details on the
    operating schedule, visit the club's page at rafars dot org (rafars.org).

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH

    (ROYAL AIR FORCE AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY)

    **
    IN CANADA, AN UNEXPECTED OVERNIGHT ACTIVATION

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: In Canada, one well-planned anniversary celebration took
    an unplanned turn recently, as we hear from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: WHen he first set out to commemorate the anniversary of an event
    known as the Bell Island Boom, Christopher Hillier VO1IDX didn't expect
    his special event station to become a camping trip. He just wanted to
    mark some Canadian history.

    CHRISTOPHER: I knew they were coming up on 40 years since an electrical phenomenon occurred on Bell Island Newfoundland that became known as the
    Bell Island Boom. There is skepticism as to whether it was a military
    plane with electromagnetic weapons or if it was superlightning. There
    have been various stories throughout history.

    CARYN: With the special callsign VD1BOOM and the Canadian Coast Guard's permission, he plans to activate the lighthouse as much as possible
    until the end of April.

    CHRISTOPHER: Because of the logistics I didn't opt to go there every
    day. It's a little bit expensive as well and it's difficult to get off
    the island sometimes.

    CARYN: Little did he know how true those words would ring on Friday
    April 6 when he headed out with Aaron Abbott VO1FOX, who was to operate
    CW while Christopher made contacts on SSB.

    CHRISTOPHER: It was kind of bad weather that day when we set out over
    there and when we arrived the lighouse keeper had actually mentioned
    "you guys are crazy for coming over here today" and he left early to go
    home.

    CARYN: The winds kicked up to 80 to 90 kilometers and so.....

    CHRISTOPHER: We didn't get out that night, we had to spend the night in
    the lighthouse.

    CARYN: So what happens when you have two hams, 100 watts going into a
    G5RV that's radiating across the ocean into the U.S. and Europe -- and
    you're stuck there all night?

    CHRISTOPHER: There's two nice recliners that we could lay back in and
    relax but instead of doing that we decided to use our time on the island
    for what we came to do. We did that until about 1:30 in the morning and
    when band conditions finally drifted away we had nothing left to do. we
    went out there and tore the antenna down and packed everything away. We
    wanted to make sure we got off the island the next morning.

    CARYN: VD1BOOM will be back on the air April 16 through April 20th and
    again on the weekend of the 28th and 29th. So at least until the end of
    this month, that's no mysterious noise you may hear coming from Bell
    Island. That's Christopher Hillier booming out at 100 watts as VD1BOOM.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT

    **
    CAUGHT IN THE NET - AND RUNNING IT

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: What's better than marking the 1st anniversary of your
    license than running a net for the first time? Paul Braun WD9GCO met up
    with a 14-year-old who did just that.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We here at Newsline like to highlight our young hams
    whenever we can. Last week we were tipped off that a young ham was about
    to run his first net that Friday, and I wanted to know more about him.

    Connor Lovell, K7CBL is 14 and has been licensed a little over a year.
    He and his father, Donn Lovell, K8DLL are involved in the KZ6BSA Boy
    Scouts club and are members of the Mad Scientist Amateur Radio Club in
    San Mateo, California. However, the club’s president is 89 years old,
    the vice-president is 96. In fact, the youngest member is 51 - until you
    get to Lovell at 14.

    I asked Lovell how the 37-year age gap affected him:

    LOVELL: It doesn’t honestly affect me at all. I know that they have a
    lot more knowledge because they’ve been around a lot longer than me.
    It’s better going to a fellow member than going to Google and possibly getting an incorrect question. And the age gap - everyone kinda of
    treats each other the same so it’s not that big of a deal.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Last Friday evening was Lovell’s first turn as net control
    for the club’s weekly net. I asked him how things went:

    LOVELL: I feel like it went smooth. In fact, there were no real issues
    on Friday night, and I feel like it was a pretty easy thing to do.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Lovell’s next goals are to get his General ticket and start
    an amateur radio club at his high school - the same school where his
    father attended and also got interested in radio:

    LOVELL: The club is something I’ve been looking forward to doing since
    it hasn’t been at my school for a while now.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: I asked Lovell what he thought was needed to attract more
    young people to the hobby:

    LOVELL: I would honestly say that people need to show especially the
    digital side of things and using computers and whatnot and possibly the Technician Class exam be looked at again by the FCC because some of
    those questions, basically, you’re never going to need to know them no
    matter how far you go, even if you’re an Extra Class.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: So, congratulations to young Connor Lovell on a successful
    first stint as net control and we here at Newsline wish him well in his efforts to start a club at his school. Young hams are the future of our
    hobby, and we need all we can get.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Paul Braun, WD9GCO

    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio
    Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the
    K7UGE repeater atop the Westgate Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas Nevada on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. local time.

    **
    RADIO HISTORIAN CLYDE HAEHNLE DIES AT 95

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: The broadcast and amateur communities are mourning the
    loss of a Cincinnati area radio historian. Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER: The radio world has lost a treasured figure in America's
    broadcast history. Veteran broadcast engineer Clyde Haehnle (HANE-ly)
    was often described as the living embodiment of Cincinnati area
    broadcasting. Clyde had a role in building some of the Crosley broadcast innovations during his tenure at W-L-W, the big station just down the
    road from what is now the Voice of America Museum in West Chester, Ohio.

    He was 95 years old at the time of his death on Sunday, April 8, but as
    a story on W-V-X-U-dot-org noted [quote] "his eyes always glowed like an
    old radio tube" [endquote] when he walked about the Voice of America
    complex or W-L-W's transmitter, which sent out 500,000
    (five-hundred-thousand) watts during World War II. He had been a board
    member of the National Voice of America Museum, which named a meeting
    space in his honor in 2016. He was one of the biggest bolsters of the
    V-O-A museum's ‘Bethany Relay Station.’

    He will be missed by hams and non-hams alike.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, K-B-3-T-Z-D.

    **
    IN SEARCH OF YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR NOMINEES

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Because young hams are important to us, we remind you
    again that the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the
    Year award is an honor for radio operators 18 and younger who hold
    licenses in the U.S. or Canada. We are accepting nominations until May
    31. If you know of a deserving candidate, submit his or her name for consideration. You can find the nomination forms on our website at
    arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab.

    **
    SCOUTS PLAN SPECIAL ACTIVATION AT WEST POINT ACADEMY

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Radio Scouting has a big week ahead. Bill Stearns NE4RD
    tells us more.

    BILL: This week in Radio Scouting we have one activation of the K2BSA callsign, one special event callsign activation, and we're getting back
    on the countdown to JOTA 2018.

    Richard Zarczynski, AC8FJ and Michael Boensch, W8MKB, will be activating K2BSA/8 at the International Friendship Camporee in Commerce Township,
    MI from April 27th through the 29th. They will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Camporee between U.S. and Canadian scouters,
    spreading camaraderie, goodwill and understanding of our scouting
    heritages. Richard and Michael will be getting scouts on the air making contacts on the VHF/UHF/HF frequency bands all over the world. Check out
    the camporee website at ifcamporee.org

    The special event station, W2P, will be operating from the midway at the
    56th Annual Boy Scout Camporee at the U.S. Military Academy at West
    Point, New York, on April 28th. The West Point Military Academy has
    been hosting an invitational Camporee for Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts
    since 1962, offering skill training and challenges to Scouts and their volunteer leaders unequaled anywhere else. Many of the challenge
    stations are scaled down versions of what the Cadets experience daily in
    their training as tomorrow's leaders. This will be the very first
    Amateur Radio Station operating at this event.

    We're six months out from the worlds largest international scouting
    activity, Jamboree on the Air. In this month we're thinking about
    Field Day. We're only two months away from the ARRL's Field Day which
    is a great opportunity to invite scouts to your club's activation or for scouters to start looking for registered Field Day events to attend with
    your Pack, Crew, or Troop! Get these scouts on the air with your GOTA
    station to earn some extra points. Demonstrate radio sport and portable operations to your local youth.

    For more information on radio scouting, please visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    **
    SARL RADIO CAMP FOR YOUNGSTERS IN NEED OF SUPPORT

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Whether you call it summer camp or winter camp, a
    program for young amateurs is in need of your support. Jim Meachen
    ZL2BHDF has those details.

    JIM MEACHEN: The South African Radio League's upcoming summer radio camp
    for young amateurs is actually a winter radio camp because it's in the southern hemisphere! Whatever you call it, it's still one of the most prestigious international youth events in amateur radio and it's a
    "first" for Africa - indeed, for South Africa! The International Amateur
    Radio Union member society conducts the week-long programs for young participants who represent more than 30 nations in Europe and Africa. It
    takes planning and equipment and expertise but most of all it takes
    financial support. The South African Radio League is hosting visitors
    between the ages of 16 and 25 through its Youth Working Group and is
    accepting donations online at zs9yota dot co dot za (zs9yota.co.za)
    August 8th through the 15th promises to be a groot ervaring of radio
    comms and goodwill - a memorable winter experience at a top-rated radio
    summer camp!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    (SOUTH AFRICAN RADIO LEAGUE)

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of Dx, Oleh, UR5BCP, will be active as E51BCP from
    Rarotonga Island in the South Cook Islands between April 15 and April
    20th. Listen for him on the Digital and SSB modes on all HF bands
    including the WARC bands. You will also be able to hear E51BCP during
    some SOTA activations. QSL via KD7WPJ.

    In Micronesia, Sho, JA7HMZ will be active as V63DX from Pohnpei Island
    between April 18-24th, focusing on 160 meters FT8. He is looking in
    particular for European stations. QSL via his home callsign direct or
    LoTW. He is not accepting Bureau QSLs.

    Listen for operators Hendro/YB3LZ, Bimbo/YB3MM and Tety/YB3TET on the
    air using their home calls slash 8 (/8) from Tinabo Island between April
    28th and May 1st and then from Selayar Island on May 1st and 2nd. Send
    QSLs via IZ8CCW, ClubLog or LoTW.

    If you were hoping to work Franz, DC4CQ from Senegal, please note that
    he has cancelled his operation as 6W/DC4CQ this month due to illness.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: SOUNDS OF SILENCE, MAYBE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We close this week's newscast with word that ham radio
    has gone Hollywood again - in a new sci-fi movie. Here's Don Wilbanks
    AE5DW.

    DON: Now here are some words to live by: "If they can't hear you, they
    can't hunt you." Sounds like some great advice for radio operators
    trying to pick up some DX contacts using a QRP signal under bad band conditions. But no, guess again: These words are the tagline for a new
    movie called "A Quiet Place." It's a futuristic horror flick in which
    aliens invade the earth and kill people for making noise.

    That's right, even space aliens sometimes find QRM unbearable.

    So why should we care? Well, the main character, a New England farmer portrayed by actor-writer-director John Krasinski, has something in his basement we should all care about. He's got a ham shack down there which
    he uses to listen for signs of life beyond Planet Earth where if you
    want to stay alive, there's no talking aloud. There's not even noisy
    walking allowed!

    Ham radio perhaps has one of the few speaking roles in a film that is
    largely devoid of dialogue. The movie, however, has been causing quite a
    bit of chatter among amateur radio operators who are always happy to see
    some of their favorite rigs get some on-screen time. You might even say
    that among hams "A Quiet Place" is raising the noise floor - but in a
    good way.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW

    PHILLY INQUIRER, DEADLINE.COM

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine;
    Deadline.com; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; the Philadelphia Inquirer; the Royal Air Force Amateur Radio Society; South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO
    Radio Show; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the
    Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Monday, April 16, 2018 18:32:46

    QSL OM. Thanks for all you do.

    Bob/W6VR


    On Apr 15, 2018, at 12:13 AM, James KB7TBT <kb7tbt@gmail.com> wrote:

    In 2001 Bill WA6ITF/SK created the Yahoo group for Amateur Radio Newsline,
    as you have seen the Amateur Radio Newsline Yahoogroup has now been moved to groups.io.

    For the past 2 weeks i have sent out the weekly report and Yahoo rejected
    it with mutable failures, I tried to resend and change things and nothing worked. Yahoogroups from what i understand is no longer supported and has
    been sold off..

    Email groups may be outdated at this point but we still have over 200
    members on the email list and for that reason alone i have changed to a more reliable service.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org








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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain us-ascii quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, April 27, 2018 21:18:02
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2113 for Friday, April 27, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2113 with a release date of Friday,
    April 27 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Tragedy in St. Louis reminds us all of tower
    safety. Hams in Lebanon get access to 6 meters -- and DXing reaches new heights! All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2113 comes
    your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **

    CREW MEMBER DIES IN MISSOURI BROADCAST TOWER COLLAPSE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We begin this week with a cautionary tale about towers and
    tower safety - this one from a tragedy outside a TV station in Missouri. Here's Christian Cudnik K0STH with more.

    CHRISTIAN: The 2,000-foot tall tower of a local public TV station in
    Webster County, Missouri collapsed on the 19th of April, killing one
    worker and injuring three others. The crew was conducting maintenance
    outside Ozarks Public Television station KOZK when the structure
    toppled. Several members of the crew were on the tower, about 105 feet
    off the ground, when the collapse occurred. The worker who was killed
    had been trapped beneath the tower's debris.

    The station is a Public Broadcasting System affiliate operated by
    Missouri State University. Stations in the region have assisted by
    helping restore service to the station. Local authorities are
    investigating to determine the cause.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    PAUL/ANCHOR: This story is a reminder as well to all of our listeners to please follow safety precautions when doing any tower work. Whether
    commercial broadcast or amateur, you can't be careful enough!

    (KYTV-Springfield)

    **
    WRTC CHAIRMAN TO SPEAK AT HAMVENTION

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The worlds of Dayton Hamvention and the World Radio Team Championships in Germany are about to converge in a little less than a
    month, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Things are getting really busy as we approach WRTC 2018.
    All is on schedule but we've heard there are a couple of contesters who haven't heard about WRTC, so we're sending Chris, DL1MGB, the chairman
    of WRTC 2018 to Dayton Hamvention to make sure all those at the Dayton Hamvention Contest Dinner are fully informed. Chris was kindly invited
    to be the key speaker. The dinner takes place on the evening of May 9th
    at the Crowne Plaza hotel in down-town Dayton.

    If you can't get to Germany in July, we're planning to keep you all up
    to date with proceedings at this internationally acclaimed event,
    considered by many Contesters as the highlight of the season.

    During the WRTC a lot of photo and video material will be created,
    processed and distributed over TV, internet and in print media often on
    the same day or even in real time. The event's media team consists of
    still and video photographers, Interviewers and editors who will create multiple articles as well as a video magazine. Streamed Internet video
    will be provided from the opening ceremony, the site allocation
    announcements and the closing event.

    Neil Rapp's Ham Talk Live podcast programme will be live from the WRTC
    on the Thursday afternoon, giving everyone the opportunity to ask
    questions about the WRTC before it kicks-off.

    Videos from previous WRTC events are available on-line on the
    WRTC2018.de website - see Amateur Radio Newsline's printed script for
    the direct URL.


    SITE: http://wrtc2018.de/index.php/en/presse-2/wrtc-the-movies

    Whether attending in person as a contestant, visitor or helper or just watching from afar we hope that the WRTC 2018 will be of interest to all
    and achieve or exceed the high standards set by previous events.

    For the WRTC 2018 Publicity team and AR Newsline this is Ed Durrant DD5LP.
    **

    SILENT KEY: FRANK VICTOR TARKINGTON W3KLQ

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The amateur radio operator who brought television to the
    White House has become a Silent Key, as we hear from Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER: Frank Victor Tarkington, W-3-K-L-Q, the amateur radio operator
    who installed the first White House TV set for President Harry S. Truman
    in 1948, has become a Silent Key. Those who worked the Navy veteran's
    station in Silver Spring, Maryland were making contact with a slice of history.

    The World War II vet had witnessed the arming of the Enola Gay while he
    was on the island of Tinian operating the radar station. By the time he
    left the service, he had been advanced to Chief Radioman. After the war,
    he worked for RCA and in 1948 it was his job to install a 10-inch screen
    in the White House Oval Office so President Truman could watch the
    opening of Congress that year.

    Frank was an avid CW enthusiast according to John Creel, W-B-3-G-X-W.
    John and Frank - and many others - could be heard on the W-B-3-G-X-W
    2-meter repeater in Silver Spring, Maryland, up until a few years ago.

    The Oakland, California native died on April 19th, at the age of 102.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, K-B-3-T-Zed-D.


    (JOHN CREEL WB3GXW, COLLINS FUNERAL HOME)

    **
    LOW-FREQUENCY TRANSMITTER TO RETURN TO THE AIR

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In Sweden, a much-loved sound is returning to the
    low-frequency bands after a two-year absence. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH
    with the details.

    JEREMY: It's almost time to listen in again for transmissions from
    Sweden's SAQ low-frequency transmitter. The Alexander alternator station
    is going on the air beginning at 1000 UTC on May 1 to mark the "Work It
    Out" observance of the European Route of Industrial Heritage. The
    transmission will be on 17.2 kHz in CW. This will be its first time on
    the air since 2016, according to Lars Kalland SM6NM.

    The vintage station, which harks back to the 1920s, is perhaps best
    known for its annual transmissions on Christmas Eve.

    While there will be no QSL cards sent or reports listed online for the
    May 1 event, SAQ is hoping to get listener reports by email sent to info
    at alexander dot n dot se (info@alexander.n.se)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    SIX METER BAND IS NOW OPEN IN LEBANON

    PAUL/ANCHOR: If you're listening on 6 meters, you can now hear some
    amateurs transmitting for the first time from Lebanon. The hams got some
    good news on World Amateur Radio Day, as we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: World Amateur Radio Day, which hams mark annually on
    April 18th, celebrates the founding of the International Amateur Radio
    Union in 1925. Hams in Lebanon, however, now have a second reason to
    consider this day an occasion for festivities. The Ministry of Telecommunications announced it was granting licensed amateurs access to
    the 6-meter band between 50 MHz and 51.975 MHz.

    The letter of permission was signed on the 19th of April and sent to the national society Radio Amateurs of Lebanon. The RAL's leadership,
    president Hani Raad OD5TE and vice president Elie Kadi OD5KU had lobbied
    hard for the access.

    RAL's website noted: [quote] "This is a true recognition from the
    Ministry of the Amateur Radio values." [endquote] Six meters itself is
    not just a valued band but is known as the so-called magic band because
    the VHF frequency can sometimes behave like HF waves and suddenly local communications turn global.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.

    (QRZ)

    **
    4 METER BAND OPENS TO GERMAN RADIO OPERATORS

    PAUL/ANCHOR: There's good news in Germany too: Hams have got temporary
    access to 4 meters. Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: A new ruling has been issued from the German regulator
    "BNetza" for the German amateur radio service. Temporary admission will
    be granted in the 4 metre band to 70.150 - 70.180 MHz, from 2 May to 31
    August 2018. This ruling will be will be published on the second of May
    in the Official Journal No 8/2018, under Notice 93/2018.
    It is expected that the same restrictions will apply as in previous
    years - 25W maximum power, no portable operation, mandatory logging of
    ALL transmissions and horizontal polarised antennas only.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **
    YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR NOMINATIONS ARE DUE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We remind all listeners that we are accepting nominations
    for the 2018 Bill Pasternak Young Ham of the Year award. If you know a promising young amateur who is 18 or younger and lives in the U.S., its possessions or Canada, please download a nomination form from our
    website, arnewsline dot org, under the YHOTY tab. Nominations are due
    May 31.

    **

    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including
    the WB3GXW repeater in Silver Spring, Maryland and simultaneously on
    EchoLink Conference Server Node 6154 on Saturdays at 8:00 PM and Sundays
    at 7:00 PM Eastern time.

    **

    SKYDIVING HAM LEAPS TO NEW DX RECORD

    PAUL/ANCHOR: In California, DXing just reached a new record height, as
    we hear from Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    CARYN: So what exactly does a QSO sound like when it's eight to 12
    thousand feet in the air?

    [SHORT AUDIO OF PILEUP]

    CARYN: That was the pileup on 20 meters greeting ham-skydiver Mark
    Meltzer AF6IM,on his Yaesu FT-817 on March 31. One of a team of
    Parachute Mobile hams, Mark had just stepped out of a plane over Byron, California picking his way through the local pileup when this happened:

    [AUDIO CLIP OF QSO] "W3IUU.....W3IUU........W3IUU Thanks for the QSO."

    CARYN: That was Lloyd Rasmussen W3IUU in the Kensington, Maryland just
    outside Washington, D.C.. Yes, Maryland. When you're on the air and IN
    the air in California that counts as DX and a record for this team.

    Lloyd, a blind amateur radio operator in Maryland accustomed to pileups
    in contests and DXing, said he'd heard about the Calfornia jump in an
    online group of other blind amateurs - and decided to go for it.

    LLOYD: "So I quickly cranked my FT-950 up to that frequency, turned my
    beam to the west and listened and right away the frequency was pretty
    quiet except there was a pileup of California stations trying to work
    him." (SkydiveLloyd2)

    CARYN: Then, as Mark tells it, success!

    MARK: SKYDIVE 2 "I heard Lloyd. Lloyd heard me...we exchanged call signs
    so we got a real contact."

    But Mark couldn't get too excited at the moment.

    MARK: "You really have to watch what you're doing because if you pay too
    much attention t ham radio and not enough to aerial navigation, you
    coudl end up over a body of water or over a freeway or someplace that
    isn't pleasant to land." (SKYDIVE 5)

    But later?

    MARK: Very very pleased and surprised to make the contact with Lloyd, I
    was just thrilled." (SKYDIVE 6)

    As for Lloyd....

    LLOYD: "Yeah it's pretty amazing. I've worked a lot of DX and I do a lot
    of contesting. I was running 100 watts on a Yaesu FT-950. It was quite
    an interesting and fun QSO." (skydiveLloyd End)

    DX, says Mark, is what you make it.

    MARK: (Skydive 4) "It's not like working Antarctica or Christmas Island
    but for us it was a huge thrill because we made it all the way across
    the country on three watts.

    Not a bad way to mark your 50th year as a skydiver and your 10th year as
    a ham, says Mark. You might just say this record's got him walking...on air.

    For news about the team and their next jump visit parachutemobile dot wordpress dot com.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT.

    **
    BICYCLING HAMS ARE 'PEDALING' A NEW IDEA

    PAUL/ANCHOR: For bicycle enthusiasts in Australia, operating mobile was perhaps never this much fun, as Graham Kemp VK4BB explains:

    GRAHAM: Amateur Radio is on a roll in Australia - and when we say "roll"
    we do mean roll. Hams are rolling out their bicycles, their trikes and
    even their velomobiles and going places. Of course they're not going
    anywhere without their trusty rigs.

    Members of a month-old online group called Pedal Radio have been
    promoting the combination of push power and foot power with the idea
    that fitness leads to fellowship - and probably more than a few good
    QSOs. There is even a homebrew aspect to the group, as some members
    share their tips for building your own trike. Most of the members right
    now are in VK3.

    If you want to try talking coast-to-coast while
    you're....coasting.....this group wouldn't mind if you rolled on in.
    Send a post to group's address at pedalradio at groups dot io. (pedalradio@groups.io)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    (PEDAL RADIO)

    **
    WEST VIRGINIA NET NEEDS NEW NET CONTROL

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A West Virginia CW Net has gone QRT for now, at least until
    it finds a net control, as we hear from Jim Damron N8TMW.

    JIM DAMRON: The North American QRP club is all about CW -- but for now,
    the club's West Virginia QRS Net is also all about finding a new net
    control so it can get back on the air. The net has had to suspend
    operation because of family obligations on the part of its present net
    control and is hoping to find someone to step into the role.

    The net had formerly met on the air Wednesday evenings at 9 local time
    at 3556 kHz but the time and date can be adjusted if necessary to suit
    the new net control.

    Hams in the West Virginia area can contact Wayne NQ0RP if they're
    interested. His email is wayne dot dillon at gmail dot com (wayne.dillon@gmail.com)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    **
    IF PIGS COULD FLY.....OR AT LEAST RUN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: The Queen City Emergency Net in the Cincinnati area is
    looking for some well-grounded hams to help out some flying pigs.
    Runners in the 20th annual Flying Pig Marathon will step off on May 6
    and backup communication is needed. If you live in the area and want to
    help, contact Steve N8TFD via email at n8tfd at fusenet dot com (n8tfd@fusenet.com)

    **

    THE WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX be listening for Jan, PA4JJ operating holiday style
    as 9A/PA4JJ from mainland Croatia between the 27th of April and the
    8th of June. Expect him to operate mainly FT8 on 40-10 metres. QSL via
    LoTW, Club Log's OQRS or direct via home call.

    Armin DK9PY, will be active as 6Y6N from St. Elizabeth, Jamaica between
    May 23rd and June 6th. Listen for Armin on 160 meters through 10
    meters, where he will be working holiday style using CW only. You can
    count on hearing him during the CQWW WPX CW Contest on May 26th and
    27th, where he will be a single-Op entry. QSL via his home callsign.


    Be listening for two YL operators -- Kay/WA0WOF/A52YLE and
    Mio/JR3MVF/A52YLM. They will be on the air from Bhutan as A52YL between
    29th of April and the 5th of May. Listen for them on 80 meters through 6 meters using CW, SSB and the Digital modes. Visit QRZ for QSL details.

    In Malta, Thomas SV2CLJ, will be active as 9H3SV between the 24th and
    31st of May. Thomas will be operating holiday style on 80-2 meters using
    CW, SSB, RTTY, PSK and FT8. QSL via his home callsign direct.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: SHOPPING FOR SOME QSOS?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, if you're shopping for a bargain in QSOs, try
    Walmart - not the stores but the parking lots Neil Rapp WB9VPG assures
    us this is a real - and real unusual - event.

    NEIL: Some satellite operators, who often go to lines between grid
    squares so that contacts will count for both grids, noticed that many of
    these gridlines across the country run though WalMart parking lots.
    Suddenly, the idea sparked to host an operating event among some members
    of the satellite community on Twitter, so they ran with it. They've
    decided that the weekend of April 28 and 29th will be a special WalMart Parking Lots on the Air weekend.

    Adam Witney, K0FFY tells us how the parking lots became popular.

    ADAM: The other thing about Walmart parking lots is they make acutally a pretty decent portable operating location. I think the other thing
    that's kinda nice about the location... you park in the parking lot even
    long term... I know the stores are known to be friendly with that. I
    think Walmart shoppers are kind of a diverse group, and there's kinda
    been some jokes on, you know, people aren't going to look twice if
    you're in a WalMart parking lot if you're in any sort of strange, unconventional dress or if you have accessories like you're strapping
    radios on yourself or waving a purple antenna at they sky... for some
    reason at WalMart you're just not going to be seen as inconspicous.

    NEIL: There's a scoring system, with certificates as well as special
    WMPLOTA QSL cards. But don't forget to mark your QSL card with a
    highlighter before it checks out. Chasers will be referred to as
    shoppers, and bonus point categories may include the "People of Walmart" award, for tweeting a picture of your operation; the "'Ol Roy" award for tweeting pictures of your dog at your operation; and the Sam Walton
    Award for the most activity. Shoppers can work up to the level of
    "greeter" or "district manager" and for making a late night QSO, you can shelve away the "overnight stocker" bonus.

    The final set of rules and scoring information is on their web site,www.wmplota.org. So put on your PJs, and bag some contacts. If
    you're hearing this report after the fact, have no fear! The next
    WMPLOTA weekend is scheduled for July 2... the birthday of WalMart and
    World UFO Day. Remember that when you're working satellites, running too
    much power can actually be bad for the satellite itself. So when you're operating WMPLOTA, be sure to ROLL BACK the power. ALWAYS.

    Reporting from the parking lot at WalMart store number 1991, this is
    Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

    (WMPLOTA)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Hap
    Holly and the Rain Report; KYTV-Springfield; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin;
    North American QRP Club; Pedal Radio; the Queen City Emergency Net;
    Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Walmart
    Parking Lots on the Air; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's
    all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address
    at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur
    Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso,
    Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, May 04, 2018 12:01:24
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2114 for Friday, May 4, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2114 with a release date of Friday,
    May 4, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams respond to massive fires in Arizona. Get
    ready for a test of cross-band operations - and yes, you can be part of Britain's Royal Wedding later this month. All this and more as Amateur
    Radio Newsline Report 2114 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    ***
    BREAKING NEWS: AMATEUR KILLED IN GEORGIA PLANE CRASH

    JIM/ANCHOR: We begin this week with breaking news. The May 2nd crash of
    an Air National Guard cargo plane has claimed the life of a ham radio
    operator who had been involved in the recent storm recovery in Puerto
    Rico. The ARRL's Southeastern Division confirmed the identity of Silent
    Key Eric Circuns WP4OXB of Rio Grande Puerto Rico. Eric was one of the 9
    crew members killed shortly after the Hercules C-130 aircraft took off
    from Georgia enroute to Arizona. Media reports indicated the plane,
    which was 60 years old, had recently been in for repairs and was
    scheduled to be decommissioned when it reached Arizona.

    **

    HAMS STEP UP TO AID WITH ARIZONA'S 'TINDER FIRE'

    JIM/ANCHOR: We also have an update on the massive fire sweeping through northern Arizona - and, of course, the amateur response. Here's Paul
    Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL'S REPORT: It’s been argued that in this world of the Internet and
    cell phones that amateur radio is more or less obsolete. But when lives
    are at stake, and conditions render all modern communication systems
    unusable, amateur radio operators prove time and time again that our “obsolete” system works.

    That is definitely the case in Flagstaff, Arizona where the Tinder Fire, started by an illegal campfire that was abandoned, burned more than
    11,000 acres and damaged or destroyed more than 40 homes during the last
    days of April and the first days of May. As many as 700 firefighters are currently on site.

    As reported by 12 News in Phoenix, the local ARES chapter, led by
    district coordinator Joe Hobart, was ready to take to the airwaves when
    cell service at the fire line began to fail. Hobart, along with husband-and-wife team Bill and Mary Lou Hagan were setting up at the
    Coconino County Emergency Operations Center on Sunday the 29th of April
    when traffic started to flow through ARES instead of the cell network.
    Hams in the field are helping to relay traffic to and from the front
    lines and working with authorities to coordinate evacuations if necessary.

    Mary Lou Hagan told the TV station “That’s what you’re here for. You’re here to help your neighbors and they’re our neighbors and the firemen -
    you have to support them.”

    As Newsline goes to production, the fire is still burning and has only
    been approximately seven percent contained. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey declared a state of emergency on Monday, April 30th.??If you’re in the
    area and need more information, please call the EOC at 928-679-8393.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Paul Braun, WD9GCO

    **

    SILENT KEY: SANDRA HEYN WA6WZN OF COSTA MESA, CALIF.

    JIM/ANCHOR: The amateur radio community is grieving the loss of an
    influential and well-known amateur radio operator. Christian Cudnik
    K0STH has that report.

    CHRISTIAN: Sandra Heyn WA6WZN of Costa Mesa, California has become a
    Silent Key. Sandi died at home on April 28th after a long illness.

    Sandi was a longtime fixture at the National Association of Broadcasters conventions held in Las Vegas, where she would be seen at the ARRL booth
    and the reception held for amateur radio operators. When the ARRL held
    its national convention in 1992 in Los Angeles, she had a major hand as
    an organizer. Her activities with the ARRL included her generosity
    through the league's Maxim Society. She was also a Life Member of the ARRL.

    Sandi was a member of the Quarter Century Wireless Association, a past
    officer of the Young Ladies Radio League and a number of other local
    clubs, including the Orange County and the Palomar amateur radio clubs.
    She was the wife of Fried Heyn WA6WZO, ARRL honorary vice president and
    past ARRL Southwestern Division director.

    They were married for 57 years. Sandra Heyn was 75.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    (ARRL)

    **
    HAMS JOIN THE MILITARY - AT LEAST ON AIR

    JIM/ANCHOR: The Military Auxiliary Radio System is all about
    communicating - so hams are marking Armed Forces Day with an exercise
    that arms them with cross-band operations. Stephen Kinford N8WB has more
    of those details.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: Are you ready for the big test? May 19th is the 67th
    annual Armed Forces Day in the U.S. and that sets the stage for an
    important exercise just a few days earlier that will engage radio
    amateurs and military stations in a test of cross-band operations. The
    test is scheduled for Saturday the 12th of May. It allows hams and
    military stations to communicate on various frequencies using SSB, voice
    and CW as well as modern military modes such as MIL-STD Serial PSK and Automatic Link Establishment, or ALE. There will certainly be some 60
    meter activity on the interoperability channels where hams and military stations can communicate directly.

    From the Barrow Army Reserve Center in Kentucky to the U.S. Military
    Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, to the Pentagon itself, military
    stations will monitor amateur frequencies and announce which ones they
    are on military frequencies. Participating amateurs who would like a QSL
    card should visit the MARS website and complete the request form. The
    website is triple w dot usarmymars dot org (www.usarmymars.org). That
    site also has a list of the military stations participating in the
    exercise, which has been held for the past 50 years. MARS involves ham
    radio operators in supporting military communication under a program
    sponsored by the Department of Defense.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (DEPT OF DEFENSE)

    **
    SPECIAL EVENT STATION CELEBRATES ROYAL WEDDING

    JIM/ANCHOR: Great Britain's Prince Harry and American actress Megan
    Markle aren't radio amateurs - but perhaps they will want to rethink
    that option after hearing this story from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: What, you may ask, does amateur radio have in common with
    weddings? Both almost always count on some great reception. So for the
    Royal Wedding between Great Britain's Price Harry and American actress
    Meghan Markle, the world's ham radio community is changing the HF bands
    into wedding bands.

    The special event call sign GR9RW – the first time “9” has been used
    it’s thought - will be active on 19th May, the day of the wedding, all
    the way through to the 23rd. While the couple exchange vows at Windsor Castle’s St George’s chapel, the Cray Valley Radio Society will be exchanging signal reports as hams operate from the club station in
    Eltham. The club will be using primarily SSB and CW with some activity
    on VHF and UHF.

    Two HF stations and one VHF station will cover all bands from 80 metres
    to 70 centimetres. A commemorative QSL card is available upon
    request.....but you'll have to provide your own wedding cake.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **
    GERMAN AMATEUR HONORED FOR HIS INVENTIONS

    JIM/ANCHOR: For one amateur radio operator in Germany, being clever and inventive is all in a day's work, as we hear from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED'S REPORT: Markus Vester, DF6NM, who is considered a specialist in high-frequency technology and MRI systems at Siemens in Erlangen,
    Germany, received an "Inventor of the Year" award from the company for
    his years of work. The radio amateur from Nuernberg holds more than 300 patents related to the receiving and transmitting units in MRI scanners.

    In a statement on the company website, Markus noted that his work
    brought with it the steady presence of ham radio. [quote] "Like many
    engineers who are also radio amateurs, work and play have never been completely separate aspects of my life. Inspiration tends to flow both
    ways between the two." [endquote]

    We here at Amateur Radio Newsline congratulate DF6NM. This is Ed Durrant DD5LP.


    (SIEMENS, SOUTHGATE)

    **

    TIME RUNNING OUT FOR YOUNG HAM OF THE YEAR NOMINATIONS

    JIM/ANCHOR: It's May - and that doesn't just mean Hamvention -- it means
    that we're coming up on the deadline for nominations for the Bill Pasternak/Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year award. This is an
    honor for radio operators 18 and younger who hold licenses in the U.S.
    or Canada. We are accepting nominations only until May 31. So if you
    know of a deserving candidate, don't wait any longer: submit his or her
    name for consideration. You can find the nomination forms on our website
    at arnewsline dot org (arnewsline.org) under the YHOTY tab.

    **

    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including
    KSET AM radio at 1300 kHz on Sunday mornings at 9:45 in Beaumont, Texas.


    **

    TWO ACTIVATIONS FOR K2BSA

    JIM/ANCHOR: The Radio Scouts of K2BSA are back on the air this week.
    Bill Stearns NE4RD has the details.

    BILL: This week in Radio Scouting we have two activations of the K2BSA callsign and we're 5 months out from JOTA.

    Russ Mickiewicz, N7QR, will be activating K2BSA/7 from the Sunset Trail District Camporee at Camp Meriwether in Cloverdale, OR on May 4th
    through the 6th. Russ will be enjoying an ocean front view from this
    Camporee while he shares his experience with Amateur Radio and gets
    scouts on the air.

    John Baddour, KC8KI, will be activating K2BSA/8 from the Firelands Scout Reservation in Wakeman, OH on May 5th. John will be having a Radio
    Merit Badge Class and Program, along with a Amateur Radio demonstration station with HTs.

    Jamboree on the Air, the world's largest scouting event will be taking
    place in October, and we're only 5 months away. If you haven't started
    making your plans for putting a station on the air, now would be a good
    time to get that kicked off. Field Day is around the corner, and is a
    great place to recruit fellow hams to help you in your JOTA effort. You
    can find operation and planning guides on our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD.

    (K2BSA)


    **
    KEEPING COMMUNICATIONS OPEN ON THE ISS

    JIM/ANCHOR: When you're DXing - really DXing - in space, you need a
    reliable backup plan. NASA is taking care of that, as Paul Braun WD9GCO
    tells us.

    PAUL: NASA's VHF backup communications system for the International
    Space Station is getting a backup of its own.

    The two-frequency VHF system is built from a system of ground stations.
    One frequency is used for Soyuz communication when Soyuz is out of the
    range of ground stations in Russia. The other frequency is used for
    emergency communications. NASA said the improvements will include new
    software installations and an upgrade of electronic components as well
    as new antennas. These antennas will permit both frequencies to operate simultaneously.

    The Goddard Space Flight Center manages two VHF ground stations in the
    U.S. -- one at at Wallops Island in Virginia and another at the
    Armstrong Flight Research Center in California.

    NASA's Mark Severance said in an agency announcement in late April
    [quote]: "The purpose of [the ground station] upgrades is to ensure the
    VHF ground stations remain a robust capability for backup and emergency communications." [endquote]

    The space station has two VHF antennas located 180 degrees apart.

    The good news is that most of the time, NASA talks with the ISS via its primary means - the NASA Space Network - which utilizes a group of
    tracking and data relay satellites. The Space Network allows for data transmissions at a much higher rate, accommodating high definition video
    and other means of communication. The backup VHF system, while critical
    to the mission, permits only audio. Still, when all else fails there is
    once again ham radio - even in space.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    (NASA)

    **
    A LESSON IN WORKING SATELLITES WITH AN HT

    JIM/ANCHOR: Speaking of space and communications, what's it like to work
    a satellite with your HT? With this report, we find out - and we welcome
    the newest member of the Newsline family: Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    ANDY'S REPORT: The Desert Radio Amateur Transmitting Society of Palm
    Springs, California is best known by the shorthand "RATS" - its initials
    - but on May 15 the club will be more likely known for its association
    with SATS - that is, satellites.

    The club is hosting ARRL instructor Clint Bradford K6LCS during its
    regular monthly meeting and Clint's talk will focus on how to use an HT
    to work amateur satellites. Clint is also optimistic that this
    presentation won't be all talk: He's anticipating more than a few
    satellite passes during the session and they're expected to be workable.

    The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. local time at the Palm Springs Fire Department Training Center and hams in the region can get talk-in via
    the 146.940 repeater using a PL tone of 107.2

    Meanwhile, hams wanting to program their radios for the scheduled
    satellite passes should visit his satellite website for a tutorial and frequency list. That website is work hyphen sat dot com (work-sat.com).

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    **

    CALL SIGNS SPORTING SPECIAL SUFFIX FOR WORLD CUP

    JIM/ANCHOR: Get ready for some athletics - on the air, that is. The
    World Cup is little more than a month away. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: You don't have to be a sports fan to get into the game on this
    ham radio event - but it helps.

    The International Amateur Radio Union's member society in Russia, the
    SRR, is inviting ham radio groups to adopt call signs relating to the
    World Cup - perhaps with "FIFA" as a suffix or, toward the end of the
    matches, "FWC," signfying the finals. The World Cup football event has inspired an amateur radio marathon of sorts. The games will be held in
    Russia from June 14th through July 15th but the hams are kicking things
    off by getting on the air the first of June.

    There will be 32 call signs on the air from Russia, each with an R18
    prefix and a suffix that honors a location where matches are taking place.

    By mid-April, organizers reported that response had been enthusiastic,
    with amateurs in 76 FIFA member nations committing to the event.

    So be listening for VB18FIFA from Canada, RC18KA from Kaliningrad,
    GM18FIFA, from Stirling, Scotland and GB18FWC from England, among many,
    many others.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **

    WORLD OF DX


    In the world of DX, plan ahead now to be lsitening for Arnold, WB6OJB,
    who will be active as 7Q7JK from Malawi between July 20-25th. Activity
    will be on 40-10 meters SSB only. QSL via WB6OJB
    only.

    Be listening right now for Jan PA4JJ, who is operating as 9A/PA4JJ until
    June 8th. He is on the air holiday style on 40-10 meters using mostly
    FT8. QSL via his home callsign, LoTW or ClubLog.

    From May first through 19th listen for Rick NE8Z/HC1MD in Poland. He
    will use his personal call sign in Poland, which is SP9E and will also
    use SP/NE8Z. Send QSL via NE8Z (see SP9E on QRZ.com), direct, by the
    W8-Bureau or LoTW after his trip.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: NO INFLATED EXPECTATIONS FOR THIS BALLOON

    JIM/ANCHOR: Students are taught to aim high but one group of high school students took that to a happy extreme in a recent physics class. Don
    Wilbanks AE5DW has that story.

    DON'S REPORT: What started as a science project at Bunker Hill High
    School in Bunker Hill, Illinois turned into a space adventure for nine chemistry and physics students. On April 24 they sent a high altitude
    balloon into near space at 70 thousand feet, equipped with a GoPro
    camera, automatic packet reporting system tracking hardware and a
    battery pack.

    The teacher Jeremiah Goltz said the project was designed to demonstrate
    the principles of physics as well as the effects of weather. They
    learned about high-tech tracking and rehearsed by fox hunting with
    homing beacons.

    Their first attempt to launch two months ago was thwarted by winds that
    were too strong. But on the 24th, after one false start, the balloon
    lifted everything skyward and they watched it soar. Its flight lasted 2
    hours and 4 minutes. Students tracked it with its APRS hardware using
    their smartphones and ultimately recovered it in Venedy, Illinois, an
    hour and 15 minutes away, sometime after lunch.

    Speaking of lunch, there was one more bit of cargo aboard that's not insignificant - a granola bar. Their teacher told the Telegraph
    newspaper that the students added that last item so they might be able
    to experience some real space food.

    For the next launch, however, Goltz said local amateur radio operators
    may want to work with the class. They might need to buy some extra
    granola bars.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    (THE TELEGRAPH NEWSPAPER)

    **
    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine;
    Department of Defense; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; K2BSA; NASA;
    Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Siemens; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted
    Randall's QSO Radio Show; the Telegraph Newspaper; WTWW Shortwave; and
    you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please
    send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information
    is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.



    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, May 11, 2018 11:00:58
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2115 for Friday, May 11, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2115 with a release date of Friday,
    May 11, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. It's almost time for the Dayton Hamvention. It's
    also almost time for a big convention of the Wireless Institute of
    Australia - and now it's time for Pubs & Clubs On the Air. All this and
    more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2115 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    TOP STORY: TIME FOR DAYTON HAMVENTION

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We open this week's report with the question: Are you ready
    for the Dayton Hamvention? You'll notice new rigs for your shack and old friends for those eyeball QSOs but....you'll notice some changes. Hap
    Holly KC9RP, of the RAIN Report spoke with Brian Markland N8UDQ,
    Hamvention's Inside Exhibit chair and shares these excerpts with us
    about what's different.

    BRIAN: "The first thing people will notice this year is our traffic
    committee has worked really hard to work out the kinks that we had last
    year. I would encourage everyone that is able to do so to use the
    satellite parking. It makes it easier for everybody and we have put
    something new in place for 2018 to help with the satellite parking. We
    now have a package pickup area. So if you go out and you buy a five
    hundred pound amplifier out in the flea market or some other large item
    that you don't want to carry back on the bus you can check that at the
    package pickup. They'll give you a ticket, you can go get your vehicle
    and our volunteers will even help you load it in your vehicle if you
    need assistance. That is one of the more significant things we have done
    this year."

    NEIL: Brian also told Hap that it will be easier to find the prize
    booths, the vendor sites will be beneath weatherproof shelters instead
    of tents, the grounds will be easier to navigate and oh yes, there will
    be a greater variety of food trucks. Improved communication will include
    text messages to cell phone users who sign up for updates. Brian said
    that all this better organization for visitors has not meant less stress
    for organizers -- but it has been worth it.

    BRIAN: "No we are not less stressed about the show because We have a
    finite number of hours to get an unknown number of things ready for 25
    plus thousand people to show up and we have to open the gates 9 a.m.
    Friday morning. Is it a little easier this year? In some respects yes
    and in other respects it's just as hard because we want to put on the
    best show possible for everybody."

    NEIL: The full interview between Hap and Brian can be heard at the
    website therainreport dot com (therainreport.com). Select the May 12th
    program -- and then we'll see you in Dayton. Our thanks again to Hap
    Holly for this excerpt.

    (THE RAIN REPORT)

    **

    WIA'S BIG GATHERING DOWN UNDER

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Of course, Hamvention isn't the only game in town. It just depends what town you're talking about - as we hear from Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    GRAHAM: Every good Aussie Ham knows what's on between the 18th and
    20th of May right? For those who said Dayton Hamvention, you're only
    partly right as it's the Wireless Institute of Australia's Radio and Electronics Convention on the Gold Coast of Queensland that's on that
    same weekend and the Aussies intend to put on a show to remember!!

    The organisers started by basing themselves at the Sea World resort with
    all of it's attractions and facilities, then they added a party at the Fishermans Wharf Tavern on the Friday evening and will follow it with an action packed Saturday. The AGM is followed by the keynote address
    "Beyond 2020", then a short lunch break before the action really starts
    with seminars by ten technology leaders, educating attendees to be
    abreast of all that is new in Amateur Radio.

    Saturday evening, a time to relax? No chance! It's the formal meal
    hosted by Jeff Johnston taking all attending on a walk across Australia
    and explaining the role HF radio played in his adventure.

    Sunday IS the relaxation day, that's if you call a field day with demonstrations of contemporary communications equipment used by
    Queensland's emergency services, a moon bounce demonstration, MMDVM demonstrations and demonstrations of equipment from vendors including
    Icom and Flex Radio, relaxing.

    Hey this wouldn't be an Australian event without a barbecue and of
    course there is one, Sunday afternoon hosted by the Gold Coast Amateur
    Radio Society.

    We are sorry for those who will be unable to get to Australia this year
    we hope your "little hamfest" in Ohio goes well. Oh and by the way, the weather forecast is always sunny and no rain on the gold coast! Joking
    apart, all the best to the Dayton organisers and we wish you a second successful year at your new venue in Xenia.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Graham Kemp VK4BB

    **
    FOR AMSAT, THE SKY IS THE LIMIT IN HUNTSVILLE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Another venue - Huntsville, Alabama - is getting some extra action after this summer's hamfest is through. Here's Andy Morrison
    K9AWM with those details.

    ANDY: If you think the Huntsville Hamfest this coming August is the
    biggest amateur radio thing in Alabama this year, think again: Just a
    few months later AMSAT-North America will be holding its annual Space Symposium in the city. Space and satellite enthusiasts will converge on
    the U.S. Space and Rocket Center November 2nd through 4th for the 36th
    annual general meeting and symposium. So what's the big deal? In
    addition to business as usual, there'll be a whole lot of amateur
    satellite presentations on the agenda along with announcements of plans
    for the world of amateur satellites.

    Details can be found on the website amsat dot org (amsat.org) as well as information about local hotel accomodations. Things are looking up -
    way, way up! - in Huntsville.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    **

    ON THE AIR, THE COMMONWEALTH GAMES GO ON

    NEIL/ANCHOR: If you're in a sporting mood and missing the recent
    Commonwealth Games in Australia, you can still compete - in a way - as
    we hear from John Williams VK4JJW.

    JOHN'S REPORT: So you thought the Commonwealth games were over? Well
    yes, they ended on the 15th of April but in Australia the game of radio
    goes on and on - at least through the 31st of May. So there's still
    plenty of time to contact special event station VI4GAMES, the call sign
    the ACMA has assigned to the Gold Coast Amateur Radio Society. You can
    be as victorious as the athletes from Australia, England and India were,
    among the more than 6,600 athletes representing 71 nations. You don't
    even need to get on your rugby uniform or do any powerlifting.
    Ultimately, successful contacts will win the best trophy of all: a commemorative QSL card. Otherwise, you'll have to wait another four
    years, when the games are held again -- this time in Birmingham, England.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm John Williams VK4JJW.


    **

    TIME IS RUNNING FOR YHOTY NOMINATIONS

    NEIL: Don't forget to send in your nominations for this year's Bill
    Pasternak Memorial Young Ham of the Year Award. We are accepting
    nominations through May 31 - that's just days away. Candidates must be
    18 or younger and be a resident of the United States, its possessions or
    any Canadian province. Application forms are available on our website arnewsline.org under the "YHOTY" tab.


    **

    BREAK HERE:

    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the AH6LE repeater
    on Sundays at 6 p.m. in Beavercreek and Wilsonville Oregon.

    **
    RAISING A TOAST TO PUBS & CLUBS ON THE AIR

    NEIL/ANCHOR: For members of the South Cheshire Amateur Radio Society
    G6TW Saturday May 12th will not be easily forgotten. You might even say
    that some of the hams will raise a little toast to the day. Jeremy Boot
    G4NJH tells us why:

    JEREMY: What comes after National Parks on the Air, Mills on the Air,
    Railways on the Air, Summits on the Air and even Walmart Parking Lots on
    the Air? Try Pubs & Clubs on the Air - PACOTA - which launched for the
    first time this year with enthusiasm through the efforts of the South
    Cheshire Amateur Radio Society here in the UK.

    Confirmed stations with special-event call signs included GB0TGI at
    Tuckers Grave Inn in Faulkland, Somerset; GB2ROY at the Royalty, York
    Gate, Guiseley, Leeds; and GB4TRO The Royal Oak, Harriseahead,
    Stoke-on-Trent.

    A good deal of planning and preparation went into the launch according
    to the event's official web pages, which are part of the South Cheshire society's website at (g6tw.org.uk).

    The event organiser, Chris Wiseman G0RDK, writes on the website that the
    goal of the first-time event is to show members of the public the kind
    of fun to be had by going on the air - and perhaps convince them to get licensed and join us.

    Of course, there's also the hope of making an intoxicating number of
    radio contacts - but that's only kind of intoxication organisers had in
    mind.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTH CHESHIRE AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY)


    **

    HIGH SCHOOL HAMS PREP FOR IRLP OPERATION

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There are a few more young hams in New York State's
    Adirondack Mountain region thanks to efforts in one local school. We
    hear more from Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    STEPHEN: Amateur Radio Station W2MCS is just about ready for prime time.
    The finishing touches are under way on IRLP Node 4592 and that will get
    this small high school station connected.

    The node isn't the only thing that's new inside Moriah Central High
    School. The club itself is new and it has gained the support and
    partnership of the local Champlain Valley Amateur Radio Club.

    Teacher Matthew Pray K2AJO, the amateur radio coordinator for the
    upstate New York school, told Amateur Radio Newsline that the genesis
    for the station was a technology club he began last September at the
    school.

    With the help of Emmett Hoops, K2ADK, another staffer at the school,
    things started happening, including classes to prep candidates for their license exam. Now there are now four new hams - a brother and sister who
    are students at the school and two more school staffers -- and there's a
    shack in the Educational Technology Center. There are three VHF/UHF
    antennas atop and a whole lot of cable donated by a local company. The
    newest development is a second shack, said Matthew: someone donated a
    mobile radio and power supply with antenna.

    Meanwhile, the IRLP is configured with a desktop computer and there's a donated radio connected so once they're on the air, be listening. You
    may not be the only one listening for long, either: Next year, Matthew
    hopes a few other folks will be listening too: He plans to apply to the
    ARISS program so the youngsters can talk to the astronauts on board the International Space Station.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB

    (MATTHEW PRAY K2AJO)

    **

    PROGRESS ON COSTA RICA'S WINLINK NODE NETWORK

    NEIL: There's a new emergency communications network in the making - and
    Kevin Trotman N5PRE has those details.

    KEVIN: The ITU\92s plan to establish a Winlink node network in the
    Dominican Republic and Central America recently moved ahead by
    significant degrees with the signing of a memorandum of understanding
    this month between the Radio Club of Costa Rica and the Fire Department
    of Costa Rica. The MOA establishes the Winlink Node Network that is
    expected provide enhanced capacity to respond in emergencies and natural disasters when alternate communications systems are needed. The Winlink network, also a form of email over radio, has been seen as a tremendous
    asset in emergency communications, especially when local internet
    services are cut off during natural and manmade disasters. The
    memorandum was signed on the 2nd of May.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (SOUTHGATE, ITU)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the World of DX, be listening for Adam, SP4CUF, in Poland. He is celebrating 40 years of ham radio activity by operating on various HF
    bands with the special callsign HF40CUF. QSL via his home callsign.

    A group of operators including Doug/W6HB, Bruce/AD7MM and Marilyn/KI7DLK
    will be active as E51DLD, E51BAS and E51MAS respectively - with other
    team members - from Rarotonga Island until the 25th of May. You may also
    hear Jim/E51JD and Bob/E51BQ. These operations will be holiday style on various HF bands and in various modes. Two of the stations will operate
    with 100 watts and wire antennas. QSL via their home callsigns.

    In the Canary Islands, members of the Uni\F3n de Radioaficionados
    Espa\F1oles EA8URL is operating as EG8CID through the 30th of May to
    celebrate Canary Islands Day. Operations will be on all bands and modes.
    QSL via LoTW or via EA8URL.

    Be listening for Walter HB9XBG operating as FO/HB9XBG from Bora Bora
    Island in French Polynesia between June 7-17th. Activity will be on 20
    meters SSB. QSL via his home callsign.


    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: STRAIGHT KEY IS A SILENT KEY

    NEIL: Finally, we end this week's report with a story of a reluctant
    ending. Paul Braun WD9GCO has a story of a very special kind of Silent Key.

    PAUL: We all know that empty moment when we learn of another Silent Key
    - but what happens when the Silent Key is bigger than just one person?
    What does it mean when a group like the Morse Telegraph Club's British Columbia chapter goes silent?

    The 10 remaining members of the chapter gathered for their final meeting
    on the 26th of April in a Canadian retirement community. The gathering
    had 21 guests in all because a few of the members brought their adult children.

    One member, Chris Naylor, age 87, called the moment the "closing of an
    era." Another member, Doug Taylor, age 78, said "our ranks are thin. I'm
    a bit sad."

    As always, however, Morse Code proved once again to be a blessing to
    them all - this time in a very literal sense. In fact, at the luncheon meeting, retired Lutheran pastor Alfred Johnson, age 92, offered grace
    over the meal by tapping out a prayer of thanks using a straight key.

    Dessert followed and the icing on the cake - a festive sheet cake - had
    the image of a small straight key and the accompanying words \93What
    Hath God Wrought.\94 That is the Biblical text sent through the first
    U.S. telegraph line on May 24 1844. It was the beginning of the age of
    the telegraph and proved the last message the chapter would send as a
    group.

    And then - silence.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO

    (THE SURREY NOW-LEADER NEWSPAPER)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Dayton Hamvention; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; the ITU; Matthew Pray K2AJO; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; the South Cheshire Amateur Radio Society;
    Southgate Amateur Radio News; The Surrey Now-Leader Newspaper; Ted
    Randall's QSO Radio Show; the Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW
    Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio
    Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington,
    Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.







    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, May 18, 2018 08:59:56
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2116 for Friday, May 18, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2116 with a release date of Friday,
    May 18 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hams in Hawaii keep an eye on an active volcano. Findings are released in the death of a New Zealand amateur -- and TV's
    "Last Man Standing" is coming back. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2116 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    INFORMAL NETS MONITOR HAWAII VOLCANO

    DON:/ANCHOR: We begin this week with breaking news. The eyes of the
    world have been on the continuing eruptions of scalding lava from
    Hawaii's Kilauea (Killa-Waya) volcano but formal assistance from the
    amateur radio community has not yet been needed. At Newsline's
    production time, all normal communications remained functional and hams
    were simply monitoring the situation. However, two nets have been
    operating informally on the island - one on 40 meters and another on a 2
    meter repeater run by Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster. As evacuations continue and national parks and other locations remain shut, Amateur Radio Newsline will continue to follow developments.

    (ARRL)

    **
    REPORT: FAULTY ELECTRIC BLANKET LED TO HAM'S DEATH

    DON/ANCHOR: The death of a radio amateur in New Zealand last summer has
    been traced to a tragic malfunction of an electric blanket. Robert
    Broomhead VK3DN has that report.

    ROBERT: Arthur Earle Plimley ZL1TAG became a Silent Key last August
    after a fire erupted in the room of his home in Thames. The 76-year-old retired electrician was pronounced dead on the scene, the result of asphyxiation from a smouldering fire.

    A new report reveals that the fire had been set off by a 40-year-old
    electric blanket that he had modified. The blanket burned the mattress
    on his bed and it is believed that he got up from the bed in an attempt
    to reach the window but was overcome by smoke.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    (RADIO NEW ZEALAND)

    **

    NEW CHANCES TO COMPETE AT WRTC

    DON/ANCHOR: While many of us have spent months planning for Hamvention
    in Dayton, Ohio, organizers in Germany have devoted their efforts to the
    World Radiosport Team Championship coming up this summer. Things just
    got a little more exciting for non-contestants too, as Ed Durrant DD5LP
    tells us.

    ED’S REPORT: The list of available WRTC awards for non-contestants is
    getting longer. Five more will be added to the two existing, WWQR and
    VOTA award programs for WRTC 2018. These programs have already had more
    than 1800 certificates issued.

    "With our awards, we want to support the already large, international
    interest in the WRTC and reward all the stations who will create the
    pile-ups for the competitors," said Michael Höding, DL6MHW, from the
    WRTC organizing team.

    Those who contact all WRTC stations can download the "Worked All WRTC
    Stations (WAWRTC)" certificate from the internet as soon as the
    competition completes. "A log does not have to be sent in. The data to
    create the certificates is generated from the log books of the WRTC
    stations." explained Awards Manager Hajo Weigand, DJ9MH.

    The "WRTC Sprint" award is all about speed. Those who contact all 63
    WRTC stations regardless of operating mode or band within a short period
    of time will be honoured with a certificate. The leader in each of the
    29 different WRTC qualifying regions will receive a prize in addition to
    the certificate.

    Stations that contact the WRTC stations on all bands and modes should
    apply for the "WRTC Most QSOs (MQ)" award to add to their collection.
    The maximum number of contacts for all WRTC stations on CW and SSB
    across all five amateur contest bands is 630. Will anyone reach that?
    Here too, regional winners get a special prize.

    The WRTC 2018 Distance Challenge relates to contacts over as many
    kilometres as possible and making up to the maximum possible 630
    contacts with the WRTC teams.This special prize is attractive to those
    who can show the most kilometres worked from the logbook, reports
    Michael Höding.

    All contacts of the WRTC teams will be verified by the referees.

    As in many sports, the WRTC referees rely on assistance. The most
    important assistance comes from the logbooks of amateurs who contact the
    WRTC teams and are received by 18:00 UTC on Sunday, July 15. Amateurs submitting these check-logs go into a draw for the "Assistant Judge" prize.

    All details of the awards will be published on the WRTC 2018 website at www.WRTC2018.de.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    CQWW DX CONTEST GETS NEW DIRECTOR

    DON/ANCHOR: Another competition, the CQ World Wide DX Contest, has a new director. CQ Magazine has named John Dorr, K1AR, successor to Doug
    Zwiebel KR2Q, who took on a number of active roles in the contest over a period of decades and will remain on the contest committee.

    John's appointment is effective immediately. A member of the CQ Contest
    Hall of Fame, John's achievements include being a two-time medalist in
    the World Radiosport Team Championship. Congratulations from all of us
    at Newsline.

    (CQ MAGAZINE)

    **

    RETURN OF 'LAST MAN STANDING' IS A FIRST FOR FOX

    DON/ANCHOR: Are you ready for "Last Man Standing?" No, we're not talking reruns - but we ARE talking QSOs. Mike Askins KE5CXP tells us more.

    MIKE: Did your hope of working KA6LMS die with Season Six of TV's "Last
    Man Standing?" Take heart: The show's Mike Baxter KA0XTT hasn't let his amateur radio license languish and neither has the Last Man Standing
    Amateur Radio Club. Recent word is that the show will live and breathe
    again this fall on the Fox network.

    The same familiar characters will be back but it's possible Mike has
    upgraded some of the equipment in his shack - we'll see. We have it on
    good authority that KA6LMS hopes to resume operation from the set on production days.

    Fox News quoted actor Tim Allen as saying "I could not be more grateful
    for the fans who wrote petitions and kept up the passion and incredible support for the show." According to Fox, "Last Man Standing" was the
    second most-watched comedy on ABC with an average of 8.3 million
    viewers. That's an enviable pileup.

    Details were still being worked out, according to producer John Amodeo (amma-DAY-OH), an Extra Class licensee himself, who said "Last Man"
    isn't ready to breathe its last.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (FOX NEWS, JOHN AMODEO)

    **

    YHOTY NOMINATIONS CLOSING AT MONTH'S END

    DON/ANCHOR: Time to finish up your nominations for this year's Young Ham
    of the Year Award. Why? Let last year's winner explain:

    MARTY: Hi there. My name is Marty Sullaway KC1CWF. I was so deeply
    honored to be selected as the 2017 Bill Pasternak WA6ITF Amateur Radio Newsline Young Ham of the Year. This year has been such a deep, deep
    blessing with the experiences of being able to travel to the Huntsville Hamfest, being on stage to receive that award - all the recognition has
    been fantastic and I am so grateful for everyone who has helped me on
    this journey, all of my Elmers and mentors. It is such an immense honor
    to be able to receive this award. As you may know the nomination period
    for the WA6ITF Young Ham of the award for 2018 is still open. It has
    been such a deep pleasure for me and this hobby has been such a deep
    honor to take part in - everyone has been so warm and kind and helpful
    and and generous. I look forward to seeing everyone at the Dayton
    Hamvention next week in Xenia Ohio. I am Marty Sullaway KC1CWF - and
    remember the deadline is approaching. Arnewsline.org!

    DON/ANCHOR: The deadline is May 31st - and it's coming soon.

    **
    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including
    the WC8VOA repeater of the West Chester Amateur Radio Association in
    West Chester, Ohio on Monday nights at 8.


    **

    RCA YOUNG ACHIEVER AWARD GOES TO COLLEGE SOPHOMORE

    DON/ANCHOR: Congratulations to Ruth Willett KM4LAO, who was honored
    recently by the Radio Club of America. Neil Rapp WB9VPG caught up with
    her recently and shares this report.

    NEIL: The Radio Club of America has presented a special Young Achiever
    Award to Ruth Willett, KM4LAO, a sophomore at Kettering University. The
    award was presented at the International Wireless Communications Expo
    held in Orlando, Florida March 5th through 9th. Ruth was able to attend
    the expo throughout the week and was honored at the Radio Club of
    America breakfast on the final day. Ruth tells us more about the
    experience.

    RUTH: It was amazing getting to go to Orlando and attend the expo and
    learn so much about the Public Safety and the wireless communication
    side of radio, because I’ve been so involved in amateur radio I've
    really only seen the hobbyist, the Amateur Radio side of the radio
    spectrum. It was very exciting getting to learn about the whole thriving
    field of wireless communications and how it's being used, specifically
    in Public Safety and what firefighters and policemen and all the public
    safety and first responders how they use the radios to make sure they
    can do their job safely. It was very beneficial for me, learning wise,
    because I was there for our four of the days getting to go to a lot of different seminars and workshops on different topics including RADAR and
    like why do we care about in-building wireless coverage and digital maps
    for in-building awareness... all sorts of very interesting things. I
    really enjoyed getting to do a women in wireless workshop on the Tuesday
    at the conference which was all morning, getting to network and learn
    from women who are successful in wireless fields.

    NEIL: Ruth is double majoring in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Physics at Kettering. Ruth has revived the campus amateur radio club and
    is making her way through all the red tape to get the club station going again.

    RUTH: So basically I started to figure out what the old club callsign
    was. I figured out that the club callsign trustee still works at
    Kettering. He's a professor emeritus now. So I got in contact with him
    and got some information about what the club used to be like, just information... just general background... and then I started working
    with other students on campus, both a couple of unlicensed and a couple
    of licensed... just people who got interested. We started working to
    figure out what we needed to do to work with Kettering for the club
    approval process.

    NEIL: And thanks to Dan Romanchik KB6NU who did a one day Technician
    class, most of those students now have a license. Congratulations to
    Ruth, and look for K8HPS to be back on the air from a campus location soon.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG.

    **

    TIME TO TUNE-UP ON THE AIR

    DON/ANCHOR: Even if you're not feeling especially competitive you'll
    want to jump into the fray for this activity, which is hosted by the 100
    Watts and a Wire online community. Jim Damron N8TMW has the details.

    JIM: When is it OK to tune up on a frequency? Well in this case we're
    talking about a different kind of tune-up. The 100 Watts and a Wire
    podcast community is hosting a three-day activity that it's calling its
    own friendly version of a tune-up. From June 8th through June 10th,
    members are being encouraged to take to the bands on all modes at all
    hours and then spot themselves on the 100 Watts and a Wire Facebook
    Group Page. The event is organized by Newsline's own Christian Cudnik
    K0STH.

    What's in it for you? Lots of QSL cards, for one thing. For another, a
    chance at a random drawing for ham shack-worthy prizes for any radio
    operators submitting their totals.

    It's not a contest - and portable operation is recommended but not
    required. It also helps to have a 100 Watts and a Wire numerical ID. You
    can join the community of more than 3,000 other hams with those IDs by
    going to the website 100wattsandawire dot com and clicking on the tab
    that says "the gathering."

    Then....get going and get on the air.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW.

    **
    IN WALES, THESE QSOs ARE IN MINT CONDITION

    DON/ANCHOR: Marking the history of secret radio operations during World
    War II, hams in South Wales are going very public. Here's Jeremy Boot
    G4NJH with details of a special event.

    JEREMY: A good QSO is worth its weight in gold - but what about silver?
    Silver may be worth even more - at least for two days in June - if
    you're a ham radio operator. The members of the Barry Amateur Radio
    Society in South Wales will be on the air using the special event call
    sign GB4RME - for Royal Mint Experience - as they operate from Her
    Majesty's Royal Mint in South Wales. On June first and second the hams
    will be celebrating covert radio operations that were used in World War
    II and marking the release of a special silver coin - a 10p coin, in
    fact - depicting James Bond, the legendary and mysterious secret agent popularised in novels by the late Ian Fleming.

    These hams will not be hiding under cover however and hope to be easily detected on all the bands using CW, SSB, FT-8 Data and some satellite operations.

    This is the second year the Barry amateurs have been permitted to
    operate inside the Royal Mint. They are hoping this return engagement
    helps them continue to make radio a not-so-secret agent of enjoyment.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (BARRY AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY)

    **
    WORLD WAR II WEEKEND IN READING, PENNSYLVANIA

    DON/ANCHOR: More World War II history is being revisited -- this one at
    a Pennsylvania airport as we hear from Heather Embee KB3TZD.

    HEATHER: It's going to be World War II weekend in Reading, Pennsylvania
    and the re-enactors and warbirds will be converging on Reading Regional Airport on June first, second and third. The weekend marks the 28th anniversary of the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum.

    So it's only natural that ham radio operators will also be called up for
    duty. Starting on the 31st of May and right through 4th of June, Special
    Event Station W-2-R will be on the air from the cargo area of the Boeing
    C-97 known as the "Angel of Deliverance," sent to the airport from the
    Berlin Airlift Historical Foundation. This model of aircraft has great significance for the role it played in the development of single
    sideband's standard use in long-range bomber aircraft.

    Arthur Collins of the Collins Corporation installed a 75A-4 receiver and
    a KWS-1 transmitter - known as the company's "Gold Dust Twins" -- into
    the cargo area of a C-97. It didn't hurt, of course, that Curtis LeMay
    and Butch Griswold were hams as well as Air Force generals.

    Be listening for the special event station and you too can go into
    battle - against the pile-ups, that is.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Heather Embee, K-B-3-T-Z-D.

    (QRZ)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, listen for special event station, 8J1ITU, on the air
    in Japan until May 31st. The station is marking the foundation of the
    ITU and is operated by the Japanese ITU Amateur Radio Club. Send QSLs
    via the Bureau.

    Listen for Yosuke JJ1DQR active as YB9/JJ1DQR from Bali through to the
    21st of May. He will operate SSB on the HF bands. QSL via home call.

    Dave VE7VR will be active holiday style in Botswana as A25VR from the
    24th to the 3rd of June. Listen for him on 40, 30 and 20 meters. Send
    QSLs via the home call.

    Special callsign TC19M will be activated through to the 20th of May to
    mark the landing of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk at Samsun and the start of
    Turkey's War of Independence. Listen for their SSB, RTTY, PSK and FT8
    signals on the HF bands. See qrz.com for QSL details.

    (DAILY DX, DX WORLD)

    **

    KICKER: REMEMBERING A CAPITAL HAM OF CAPITOL HILL

    DON/ANCHOR: We close with this report about a special event station that honors a man who was a key lawmaker in United States history. He also
    made it a point to be especially accessible to his constituents -- on
    the ham radio bands. Here's Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: He was an amateur people knew by his call sign K7UGA, or even by
    his first name, Barry -- although to much of the nation and even the
    world he was also called United States Senator. It's no secret that
    Barry Goldwater was a lifelong ham and an advocate for the rights of
    amateur radio operators. An Air Force veteran, he played an active role
    with the Air Force MARS, providing phone patches for soldiers calling
    home during the Vietnam War. Barry Goldwater became a Silent Key on May
    29, 1998. This year, which marks the 20th anniversary of his death,
    Special Event Station K7UGA will be on the air from the 28th of May to
    the 3rd of June on all bands and all modes. The station is being
    operated by the Central Arizona DX Association. So it is still possible
    to get a QSL card from K7UGA - this time in a way that honors and
    remembers the Arizona native who - like us - just loved being a part of
    the hobby.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (THE TELEGRAPH, CADXA)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; the Barry Amateur
    Radio Society; Central Arizona DX Association; CQ Magazine; the Daily
    DX; DX World; Dayton Hamvention; Fox News; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; John Amodeo; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; Southgate Amateur Radio
    News; The Telegraph newsletter; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the
    Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners,
    that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our
    address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at
    Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW in Picayune,
    Mississippi saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, May 25, 2018 10:32:56
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2117 for Friday, May 25 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2117 with a release date of Friday,
    May 25 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Hamvention 2018 has come and gone. North
    Carolina amateurs go mobile in an ambulance -- and there are new hams in
    China and South Africa. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline
    Report 2117 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    HAMVENTION: MORE THAN FAIR AT THE FAIRGROUNDS

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: With Hamvention 2018 a memory, plans for next year have already begun - but first, Kevin Trotman N5PRE takes stock of this
    year's experience.

    KEVIN: Are you ready for Hamvention 2019? OK - not so fast - it's only
    days since the big gathering in Xenia wrapped things up. General chair
    Ron Cramer KD8ENJ told Newsline the final attendance count wasn't in
    yet, but he expected this year's attendance to top the nearly 30,000
    amateurs who visited the fairgrounds in 2017. The theme of "Amateur
    Radio, Serving the Community" didn't just find its way into various
    award ceremonies and forums but even turned up in informal gatherings
    near the food trucks where hams from Puerto Rico and other storm-ravaged places enjoyed eyeball QSOs for the first time with hams who shared last year's storm assistance efforts with them. Ron said some of the greatest strengths of the weekend event were the new weather-resistant tents and
    the 767 volunteers who came in from around the world to keep operations running smoothly. Meanwhile there were special hours at the Voice of
    America Museum in nearby West Chester Ohio which opened its doors to
    more than 250 hams from around the world who got immersed in broadcast
    history and even got on the air. To quote Ron, when Newsline asked him
    about the overall positive feedback so far: "If you have any complaints
    about Hamvention 2018 you probably weren't there."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (RON CRAMER KD8ENJ)

    **
    NEW CQ HALL OF FAMERS INDUCTED AT HAMVENTION

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Their contributions to the amateur community landed 11 notables in the limelight at Hamvention. Mike Askins KE5CXP has those
    details.

    MIKE: The CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame inducted 11 new members during Hamvention, including Silent Keys ranging from the late actor Marlon
    Brando FO5GJ to the three astronauts killed in the Challenger shuttle
    disaster of 2003: Laurel Clark KC5ZSU, David Brown KC5ZTC and Kalpana
    Chawla KD5ESI.

    The list also includes open-source QRP kit designer Ashhar Farhan
    VU2ESE, Silent Key Grady Fox W4FRM, one of the pioneers of SSB; African-American broadcaster and college radio supporter Wendell King, a Silent Key who was formerly 2ADD and Fred Lloyd AA7BQ who founded
    QRZ.com. The list also included well-known educator and youth advocate
    Carole Perry WB2MGP; cybersecurity's Mark Pecen KC9X/VE3QAM and U.S.
    Army photographer Ed Westcott W4UVS.

    The Hall of Fame was created in 2001 by CQ Magazine and has since
    inducted 321 members.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (CQ MAGAZINE)

    **
    THIS "HAMBULANCE" ANSWERS THE CALL

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Going mobile is part of the amateur radio experience -
    and is there any better vehicle for public service than a refurbished ambulance? One club doesn't think so and Kent Peterson KC0DGY tells us why.

    KENT The Johnston County North Carolina ham club does what many clubs
    do. They have around 65 members who support hurricane evacuees when they
    come inland. They run and support a repeater. They participate in field
    day. And they have their very own "hambulance."

    MARK: Somebody called it a hambulance (chuckles).

    KENT That's right. They have a converted ambulance which once belonged
    to the county. Club member Paul Dunn KD4BJD spotted an unused ambulance
    as club president Mark Gibson N4MQU explains.

    MARK: He kept seeing this ambulance parked and saw grass growing over it
    they just weren't using it and he started asking asking questions one
    thing led to another and Johnston County donated the ambulance.

    KENT Mark says its still a work in progress, but currently has two
    operating positions. The truck has some Icom HF gear as well as the
    ability to monitor public safety frequencies.

    MARK The first part of April we put 10 mounts up on top and we can add
    more operating positions if we need to.

    KENT And the hambulance has also been tasked with educational outreach.

    MARK:The general public doesn't know anything about communication and
    that's the vision for the truck. We had some elementary school students
    who have a ham radio club and they took a tour in the truck and were fascinated by it.

    KENT And they've driven it to a truck and tractor show to showcase
    amateur radio as well.

    MARK His vision is to help any community who needs it and we should be
    able to hook up into their system, we're just excited as a club to help
    them out with that.

    KENT For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY

    **
    AMATEUR EXAMS ARE A FIRST FOR ST. JOHN

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Another way to respond to emergencies effectively is to
    Elmer candidates who want their licenses. That happened recently, for
    the very first time, on the Island of St. John in the Caribbean. Here's
    Andy Morrison K9AWM with more.

    ANDY: There are many things the U.S. Virgin Islands are known for - blue
    skies and clear water among them but - ham radio operators? Guess again.
    The Island of St. John has doubled its modest amateur radio population following the island's first VE session held May 6 in cooperation with
    St. John Rescue and the islands of St. Croix and St. Thomas. After
    September hurricanes Irma and Maria knocked out communications for the remainder of 2017, Jennifer and Larry Pruss believed the island needed
    more than 10 active hams. Motivated by last year's 100 days of
    post-storm outages, there are now 18.

    JENNIFER: "We had complete loss and blackout of all power and
    communication services. So I think that made everyone heightened to the
    fact that ham radio is extremely useful when all else fails."

    ANDY: That was Jennifer Pruss who took - and passed - both her
    Technician and General that day. She and her husband Larry NP2LP are
    proud that their 12-year-old daughter, Skylar, got her Tech ticket that
    day too. Larry says many of the hams expect to become active and useful
    to St. John Rescue, which is providing the new hams with free radios.

    LARRY: "My wife and I are both members of St. John Rescue and we were
    going to do this regardless of their help however they stepped up and
    offered to help pay for materials and ultimately they are going to pay
    for radios. They have given us a grant to pay of $4,000 for us to buy
    handheld transceivers so people who have taken the study courses and successfully passed are going to get a radio compliments of St. John
    Rescue."

    ANDY: With the help of volunteer examiners from sister islands as well
    as the area ARRL section coordinator, Larry and Jennifer know this won't
    be the only VE session ever to be held on the island.

    LARRY: "The next step is to get them their radios and get the radios distributed and programmed and to teach the General exam. Concurrent
    with all that is to get the ARRL section coordinator to come over from
    St. Croix. He has put together a grant for I think about $25,000 to get
    some repeaters because our repeater system was damaged pretty severely
    during the storm so we are going to be putting up new repeaters as well.

    ANDY: They expect to have a lot more General class licensees by the time
    storm season rolls around this year. For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    **

    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including
    the N50ZG repeater in New Orleans, Louisiana on Sundays at 8 p.m.,
    following the net.


    **
    YOUNG HAMS PREP FOR DAVE KALTER MEMORIAL DX ADVENTURE

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: It's going to be a great summer for a group of young
    amateurs. They're headed to Curacao and Neil Rapp WB9VPG tells us what
    they're up to.

    NEIL: Four young hams have been selected for the Dave Kalter Memorial
    Youth DX Adventure this summer. This group will be headed to the famous
    PJ2T contest station in Curacao from July 19th through July 24th. Each
    year, a small group of young people and a parent travel to an exotic
    location to be the DX, and work the pileups. Leading the team will be
    Jim Storms, AB8YK and Ron Doyle, N8VAR. Jim tells us about what they
    hope to accomplish.

    JIM: What we want them to do is actually experience being the DX. We
    call it an adventure, because we don’t take everything... we stay in
    hotels and we fly in. But, we want them to be the DX, hear that first
    pile up, and it is so much fun to watch their eyes when they hear it the
    first time. And then start beating through it. And then watch as they
    grow and learn how to do pileup management and how to pick the right
    antennas and point the right areas at the right time. That’s what we try
    to do is help them grow in their radio knowledge plus give them a great experience and hopefully light that fire to actually be on a DXpedition sometime in the future.

    NEIL: This year's youngsters include 13 year old Violetta Latham, KM4ATT
    of Greencastle, Pennsylvania; 13 year old Dhruv Rebba, KC9ZJX of Normal, Illinois; 14 year old David Samu, VE7DZO of Prince George, British
    Colombia; and 15 year old Mason Matrazzo, KM4SII of Clemmons, North
    Carolina. Mason tells us about finding out that he was selected for the
    trip.

    MASON: They sent me an email, the YDXA people, and it was like 11
    o’clock at night. I was just checking my email one more time before I
    went to bed. And it came through right as I was about to close the
    computer, and literally did a happy dance and kinda ran a couple of laps around the bedroom and things like that. I was definitely extremely
    excited when I found out.

    NEIL: When I asked Mason what part of the trip he's looking forward to
    the most, this is what he had to say:

    MASON: I'm pretty much looking forward to everything down there,
    especially getting to operate from such a nice station as PJ2T is. I
    hear them in contests all the time, and they always have one of the big signals on the band so being able to operate from that kind of station
    is going to be super exciting. And, there will be quite sizable pileups
    I’m sure... and I kind of have an addiction to running pileups so that’s going to be extremely enjoyable to say the least.

    NEIL: Listen for these young hams running the pileups this summer from Caracao, and be sure to give them a call. It will be an experience of a lifetime.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG

    **
    NEW BANDS FOR AMATEUR USE IN IRELAND

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Things are about to get a little roomier on the amateur
    bands for radio operators in Ireland, as we hear from Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: Hams in Ireland are looking forward to making use of two new ham
    radio bands and a lot more spectrum under a new band plan being worked
    out by the Irish Radio Transmitters Society. The proposal would create 8 metres between 30 and 49 MHz and 5 metres between 54 and 69.9 MHz.
    Digital television would also be accommodated, among other modes, on the expansive 5 metre band. The IRTS calls the draft plans a focus for input
    and discussion on the national use of the expanded bands and welcomes
    views and suggestions. Those thoughts can be sent via email to
    newspectrum at irts dot ie (newspectrum@irts.ie) up until the 30th of June.

    Meanwhile, effective immediately, use of the 4 metre band has been
    extended making 69.9 MHz to 70.5 MHz available for amateur use. This
    also establishes an FM calling channel of 70.450 MHz.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (IRTS)

    **
    VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN CALIFORNIA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: If you're within easy traveling distance from Long
    Beach, California, the organizers and athletes in the Special Olympics
    could use a little - or a lot - of your time. For that story, here's
    Jack Parker W8ISH, the newest addition to our Newsline family.

    JACK: Let the games begin - but not without amateur radio operators! The Special Olympics Summer Games are set to kick off in Long Beach,
    California on June 9th and 10th on the campus of California State
    University. Hams are needed to assist with 2 meter communications on
    both days between 8 am and 4 pm. Even if you can only cover for half a
    day, you are welcome to volunteer. The organizers are looking to provide communications coverage for events such as track and field, flag
    football and swimming along with Games headquarters as well as medical
    and supply sites. If you're a first-timer at passing messages at these
    kinds of events, same-day training will be provided. It's a good chance
    to learn emergency and event communications and experience what it's
    like working in a high-traffic controlled net. Hams will be covering
    routine communications as well as any more urgent needs. For details
    contact ke6tnm at scran dot org (ke6tnm@scran.org)

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jack Parker W8ISH.

    (MARK LIDIKAY KE6TNM)

    **
    NEW LICENSEES GET ON THE AIR IN CHINA AND SOUTH AFRICA

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: Licensing exams were held recently in China and South
    Africa and Ed Durrant D5LP has the results.

    ED'S REPORT: China's first Class C licensing exam has been held for
    amateurs, resulting in 35 new holders of the license, which is the
    highest class in the nation. Class C licensees are permitted as much as
    1 kW of power on frequencies below 30 MHz and 25 watts on higher bands.
    The Chinese Amateur Radio Club administered the test to a total of 56 candidates. The organizers report that the exam marked the first use of
    an identification card image recognition system to verify the
    test-takers' identities.

    Meanwhile, in South Africa, there are 17 new young licensees. The South African Radio League reports that 17 youngsters from the Bhisho Scout
    Group who attended a boot camp have successfully tested in that rural community. They are now holders of the Class B license, which is an introductory level license carrying a ZU prefix and is the equivalent of
    the Foundation license in the UK. It is issued to amateurs younger than 25.

    Congratulations to everyone.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this is Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    WORLD OF DX:

    In the world of DX, Mike, VK4DX, will be active as VK4DX/P from Russell
    Island in the Southern Moreton Bay Islands, between June 1-3rd. Listen
    for him on 80-20 meters where he will be using CW and SSB. QSL via
    VK4DX, direct, LoTW or OQRS.

    Listen for Eric, K0EAP, Eric, active as KH6/K0EAP from the Big Island of Hawaii through June 2nd. He is on 40/30/20/15
    meters using CW and SSB and has plans to activate at least 1 SOTA and
    WWFF. QSL via LoTW, QRZ, by the
    Bureau or Direct.

    On Bonaire Island, Lauren/W0LD and Jon/N0JK will be active on 6 meters
    with a special PJ4 callsign from the PJ4G station during the ARRL VHF
    Contest which is June 9 and 10th). Before and after the contest, find
    them on HF and 6m using CW, SSB
    and FT8. QSL via W0LD.

    (OHIO PENN DX)

    **

    KICKER: THEIR FAMILY HOME IS THEIR FAMILY SHACK

    STEPHEN/ANCHOR: We end this week's newscast with the story of a ham
    family adventure. You'll recognize one of the names in this report -
    Neil Rapp WB9VPG mentioned her in his report just a few minutes ago. Now
    let's hear the rest of the story from Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    DON'S REPORT: It seems the Latham family almost didn't need to leave
    their home to attend Hamvention in nearby Ohio. Every day at their house
    in Greencastle, Pennsylvania is Hamvention. Of the seven children, six
    have licenses as do parents Rachel KM4ATS and Shannon KA8JRQ. The
    Lathams were all at Xenia together recently and Violetta, KM4ATT, who is
    13, spoke at the Saturday morning Youth Forum. The family's youngest ham
    is Aaron KM4LEJ, who's 10 but has had his ticket for two years. Ohio,
    however, is a short trip compared to one of their next journeys -
    they're heading to Curacao. Don't expect to find the Lathams lounging on
    the beach, however. They're going on DXpedition and the only waves
    they'll be surfing are radio waves.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; the ARRL; CQ Magazine; Dayton Hamvention; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Mark Lidikay KE6TNM;
    Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZ; Ron Cramer KD8ENJ; Southgate Amateur Radio
    News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; the Wireless Institute of Australia;
    WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org.
    More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB in Wadsworth Ohio
    saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
    enjoyed it!

    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
    (text/plain utf-8 quoted-printable)



    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, June 01, 2018 10:02:54
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2118 for Friday, June 1, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2118 with a release date of Friday,
    June 1, 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. In Montana and Maryland, hams respond to floods.
    In Australia, amateurs take on on-air bullies - and South Africa awaits
    use of 60 meters. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report
    2118 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    YELLOWSTONE ARES STEPS IN DURING MONTANA STORM

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We begin this week's newscast with reports of amateur
    response to flooding. While most of the U.S. concentrated on their
    holiday celebrations over Memorial Day weekend, hams in two parts of the country dealt with crisis conditions. We begin in Montana with the
    Yellowstone Amateur Radio Emergency Service. Here's Kent Peterson KC0DGY.

    KENT: Amateur radio operators in the Billings, Montana area mobilized
    over the Memorial Day holiday weekend as a "perfect storm" brought
    massive flooding to the region brought on by melting mountain snowpack,
    heavy rain and an anticipated crest of the Yellowstone River. There were concerns too that the region's complex canal system that feeds local
    farms could further complicate the scenario. As the holiday weekend
    began on Friday, May 25th, Brad Shoemaker, Disaster and Emergency
    Services Director turned to YARES, the Yellowstone Amateur Radio
    Emergency Services. Ron Glass WN7Y, the ARRL's Emergency Coordinator for Yellowstone County, activated a net, 23 hams checked in and staffing got
    under way. Five hams went the next morning to sandbag centers where they helped manage traffic and ensure that no one ran out of bags or sand. In
    some cases, said Ron, the hams even helped residents load the sandbags
    into their vehicles. Others staffed the Emergency Operations Center and
    Net Control while still others served as "loggers" tracking callouts.
    The weekend operation brought logistics challenges and long work shifts,
    Ron told Newsline, but the hams kept their duties covered. By Monday, as
    the anticipated rainstorm began to hit hard, hams were dispatched for
    River Watch Duty and at roadway locations to identify any threatened
    bridges, flooded roads and other trouble spots identified by the county.
    The damage ultimately turned out to be less than predicted. Ron told
    Newsline: [quote] "Even though the storm dropped over an inch of rain in
    the first 15 minutes and we were driving through flooded streets the
    rest of the day, the event was NOT as large as expected." [endquote] By
    3 p.m. that same afternoon, the flood warning was dropped and the EOC
    went into standby mode, said Ron. He told Newsline that YARES was
    officially deactivated within the hour.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Kent Peterson KC0DGY.

    (RON GLASS, WN7Y)

    **
    HAMS PREP FOR FLOODED MARYLAND MILL TOWN

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Meanwhile, not quite two years after the historic mill town
    of Ellicott City Maryland was nearly swallowed up by flood waters, it
    was being described again as a "war zone." Memorial Day weekend storms
    and flooding that affected other parts of Maryland brought particular devastation to this Howard County community where there were reports
    that one man had gone missing and a body was recovered two days later
    from the water. Maryland hams wasted no time. Marty Pittenger KB3MXM,
    the ARRL Maryland-DC Section Manager told Newsline that just as the
    flood alerts started popping up in early evening on Sunday May 27th, the
    ARES team activated. Marty said the word went out - "this is NOT a
    drill" - and a half-hour later, at 7 p.m. when the governor declared a
    state of emergency, stations had already been checking in. As they
    remained on standby, hams began sharing weather information, agency and SKYWARN reports and other situational details. According to Marty the quickly-assembled team comprised 40 hams across five repeaters covering
    an area of about 5600 square miles across six counties. Hams were also monitoring EchoLink and conducted a quick test on 80 meters in case HF
    was needed to pass messages.

    Marty said that the nets remained active until instruction to stand down
    came at 10:15 p.m. Marty said there was ultimately no need for the hams
    to be deployed to assist.

    (CNN, Marty Pittenger KB3MXM)

    **

    SLENT KEY: JIM SELLARS N0UAM

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Net control operators are the heart and soul of emergency response and one noted weather-watcher has become a Silent Key, as we
    hear from Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    GERI: Jim "Mad Dog" Sellars N0UAM became a Silent Key on May 22nd - but
    for all the years before he was an active radio amateur who lived, some
    might say, in the eye of the storm. An enthusiastic storm-chaser, Jim
    was perhaps best known as Assistant Director of VoIP Hurricane Net
    Operations and Net Control.

    He most recently made a name for himself as a tireless net control
    during the 2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season which included Maria, Irma and Harvey. He also played a big role in the National Weather Service
    Springfield Missouri SKYWARN program.

    The Springfield, Missouri resident had battled a heart condition for
    years. He was 64 at the time of his death.

    A certified meteorologist, Jim wrote his own obituary for the local
    newspaper and described his final wishes: he wanted to be cremated and
    then have his ashes scattered into a tornado. He wrote "that'll be fun."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Geri Goodrich KF5KRN.

    NEIL/ANCHOR: There was a Final Call for Jim on May 26 just prior to the
    WX4NHC annual test. Rob KD1CY was net control. Please listen to this
    tribute on our website. Go to arnewsline.org and click on the "Extra"
    tab on the left.

    **
    TIME TO TALK TO A MINESWEEPER

    NEIL/ANCHOR: What are you doing on the air June 1st through June 3rd?
    It's Museum Ships Weekend and you have a chance to work a Navy
    minesweeper. Paul Braun WD9GCO talked to one of the team members.

    PAUL: If there’s one thing that gets hams excited, it’s a special-event station. And when you can combine a group of special-event stations into
    a major happening, all the better. Such is the case with Museum Ships
    Weekend, where groups of hams activate from various historic ships that
    have been turned into museums. One of those ships is the USS Lucid, the
    last of the ocean-going wooden minesweepers.

    A group of YL’s from the Stockton-Delta Amateur Radio Club will be
    activating the Lucid that weekend. I spoke with one of the members,
    Emelia Seiferling KI6YYT about how they got involved:

    SEIFERLING: My husband and I were presenting a program for the Stockton
    radio club. It was concerning an activation that I had participated with
    a YL group - KM6CIR - Ladies of the Net. They had organized a session on
    the USS Hornet. And after the program, the president there, John, N6ZQ,
    said, "Well, we should have something like that here in Stockton!" And
    after a little talk over the next few days, it was decided to activate
    the USS Lucid that the Stockton club is affiliated with and have a YL afternoon on Museum Ships Weekend.

    PAUL: Seiferling originally got involved with activating ships through contacts she had made on a net:

    SEIFERLING: When I retired, my schedule got flexible enough that I could
    check into the 40 meter Ladies' Net, KM6CIR it's just a general net for
    all YL's - all YL's are welcome. One of the first things they were
    talking about after I started trying to check in on a regular basis was
    an activation that they were doing at the USS Hornet because one of
    their members had connections there. Then several months later we did an activation on the Queen Mary, because again there was another member who
    had some connections to get us permission to use the radio room. So,
    when this thing came up with the Lucid, I contacted the ladies and
    hopefully we'll have several people from our group show up.

    PAUL: You can find out more details at the club’s website, triple-w dot
    W6SF dot org. Museum Ships Weekend runs from June 1st through the 3rd.
    The Lucid is the only ship of her kind left in the USA, so the hope is
    that events like this will bring more attention to the restoration efforts.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I’m Paul Braun, WD9GCO.

    **

    SCOTLAND's 'UNICORN' TO LAUNCH FROM ALASKA

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Do you believe in unicorns? Some hams in Scotland do - and
    Jeremy Boot G4NJH tells us why.

    JEREMY: Radio amateurs in Scotland are going to be mighty proud later
    this year. The PocketQube satellite they constructed at Alba Orbital in Glasgow is being prepared for launch sometime during the third quarter
    of this year. It will be sent into space from Kodiak, Alaska on board a
    Vector Launch Inc. rocket for a mission that is expected to last about
    45 days.

    The launch is considered a milestone for Scotland's space industry and
    will mark the first time an orbiter built in that country has not been piggybacked aboard another launch vehicle. Alba Orbital has collaborated
    on the project with the University of Aachen in Germany as well as its
    amateur radio club DL0FHA.

    The satellite has been named the Unicorn-2A and it will have downlinks
    in both the 437 MHz and 2400 MHz bands and one of its transmission modes
    will be LoRa, a long-range, low-power wireless platform. The Unicorn is
    the creation of amateurs Constantin Constantinides MM6XOM, Alejandro
    Gonzalez Garrido EA7KDU and Sajimon Chacko 2M0DSY.


    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (BBC)

    **

    BREAK HERE:
    Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline
    heard on bulletin stations around the world including the WB0QXW
    repeaters in St. Louis Missouri on Monday nights following the World Friendship Net which begins at 7 p.m. local time on EchoLink.

    **

    NEW 100 kHz ALLOCATION ON 60 METERS for SOUTH AFRICA

    NEIL/ANCHOR: South African hams are getting some new frequencies for
    their QSOs as we hear from Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT: There's encouraging news for amateurs in South Africa waiting to
    get on 60 metres. Hams have been granted access to the band between 5350
    and 5450 kHz on a shared non-interference basis. They have also been
    given 5290 kHz for a South African Radio League propagation research
    project involving WSPR beacons. The South African Radio League reports
    that the Council will publish a band plan as soon as possible,
    permitting the start of 60-metre operations on the new allocation. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa published the good
    news in the new National Radio Frequency Plan on Friday, May 25th. The
    South African Radio League Council has meanwhile issued a special appeal
    to hams, reminding them to guard against misconduct on the air. The
    message from SARL President Nico ZS6QL was issued following the
    resolution of a situation of abuse reported on 20 metres by the Namibian Amateur Radio League.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    (SOUTHGATE, SARL)

    **
    NO ROOM FOR AMATEUR RADIO BULLIES

    NEIL/ANCHOR: On the subject of on-air behavior, an unfortunate side to
    our hobby is the bullying and trolling that happens on the air. One ham
    in Australia is trying to help others make the best of a tough
    situation. Here's Jim Meachen ZL2BHF with that report.

    JIM MEACHEN: Yes, there are bullies on the air. Onno Benschop VK6FLAB discovered this first-hand as a beginner licensee in December 2010 when
    he said he was regularly harassed by amateurs with more advanced
    licenses and subjected to rude remarks. For the past few years, the ham
    and amateur-radio podcaster has spent time trying to provide guidance
    for all those who've had to endure that same painful experience. In
    addition to speaking locally at amateur radio classes about ways to
    deflect the abuse rather than engage it, Onno provides suggestions and confidence and hosts a weekly net for new and returning amateurs.

    Since July 2014 he has also maintained a bully reporting form at vk six
    dot net (vk6.net), the NewsWest website. Hams who've felt bullied can
    use the online form to report all the details. There are also links to articles and sources of additional support, including directions on how
    to report any recording of the incident. The website indicates that any pattern of repeat offenses is turned over to the ACMA with
    recommendations that official action be taken.

    Onno told Amateur Radio Newsline in an email that while bullies may
    always be out there in the world, these efforts provide victims with
    recourse and support. He told Newsline [quote] "they have given new
    entrants a level of confidence that was simply not available when I
    started." [endquote]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Jim Meachen ZL2BHF.

    **

    OHIO HAMS KEEP THAT HAMVENTION FEELING ALOFT

    NEIL/ANCHOR: A team of hams in Dayton has discovered that even though Hamvention is over, there's a really good way to keep that Hamvention
    feeling aloft: Launch a balloon! Andy Morrison K9AWM explains.

    ANDY: It's helium-filled, it's high-flying at 30 thousand feet and it's communicating with the world via APRS as it circumnavigates the globe.
    This is the balloon that was launched just outside Building 5 on the
    Greene County Fairgrounds on Saturday, May 19, during Hamvention. One
    week later the Mylar balloon and its 13-gram payload, which includes a
    25 mW solar-powered transmitter, headed toward Morocco and points
    beyond. These launches are nothing new said Joe Muchnij N8QOD, the
    committee chairman for the Dayton Amateur Radio Association. In fact,
    Bill Brown WB8ELK, who oversaw the technical side of the beacon's
    launch, has sent quite a few ballons into space - including one launch
    for a school in which the balloon has already gone around the world four times, Joe said. Reports have already come in from Nova Scotia, the
    Azores and the Canary Islands as the ballon, traveling at 55 miles an
    hour, travels powered by the wind and that Hamvention spirit. Keep
    listening!

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    **
    FRIEDRICHSHAFEN LETS HAMS OPERATE AERONAUTICAL MOBILE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: The Dayton high altitude balloon is not the only Ham Fair
    that's up in the air as we hear now from Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    ED: That's right! Some lucky visitors to the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen
    event this weekend have already booked their seats in one of two
    chartered Zeppelin Airship flights leaving from the airport next to the
    show grounds where, as well as getting some great views of the area,
    they will also be able to operate Aeronautical Mobile!

    Great as that may be there's more happening in Freidrichshafen this weekend....

    Dib Dib Dib or Dot Dot Dot ? This years Ham Radio event at
    Friedrichshafen Germany has the theme of Amateur Radio working with The Scouting Association. There has long been links between Scouting and Ham
    Radio and this year, the 43rd. International Ham Radio exhibition wants
    to celebrate Radio Scouting. There will be radio Fox Hunts, a youth tent
    camp within one of the Zeppelin sized halls and several related free
    teacher training forums for school teachers and scout leaders. This year
    will see a two day "Ham Camp" with Ham Radio activities including
    Quizzes, kit building (this year it's the "Ham Camp Bell"), telecoms experiments, radio operation, go-kart racing and Morse code.

    As well as the Radio Scouting theme there will of course be the usual
    large inside Flea Market, the regional Makers Faire and 180 exhibitors
    and traders from 30 countries making this Europe's largest and the
    worlds third largest hamfest after the Tokyo Ham Fair and Dayton.

    Exam tests for both German and US licences will take place. Food is
    available either inside or outside in the Beer Gardens. We'll see what
    the weather brings but forecasts are good at the moment both for sunny
    weather and the fun and excitement at Ham Radio Friedrichshafen 2018!

    Looking forward to bringing you some highlights of the event in next
    weeks show, this has been Ed Durrant DD5LP for Amateur Radio Newsline.

    **
    WORLD OF DX

    In the World of DX, listen for Thomas, F4HPX operating as FR/F4HPX from Reunion Island through the 15th of June. He is operating on SSB, digital
    modes and a little CW on 40 through 15 meters. QSL via LoTW, Club Log's
    OQRS or via home call (direct or bureau).

    The EIDX Group is preparing to activate ALL Irish IOTA Groups. Using the
    'Echo Juliet' prefix, EJ0DXG will be active from IOTAs EU-006, EU-007,
    EU-103 and EU-121 this summer. The first activation will be "Little
    Saltee Island" which is EU-103 between June 15th and 18th. The group
    will be active on the HF and 6m bands using CW, SSB and the Digital
    modes. QSL via M0OXO.


    (DX WORLD, OHIO PENN DX)

    **
    KICKER: BROWN UNIVERSITY'S LATEST "GRADUATE" IS A SATELLITE

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We end this week with a college story - and as Skeeter Nash
    N5ASH reminds us, graduates aren't all a university can launch.

    SKEETER: In this season of commencements, speakers often address the new graduates urging them to aim high - but there's one graduate of Brown University in Rhode Island that didn't need any encouragement to be
    launched: It's the EQUiSat satellite sent to the International Space
    Station and it was sent into the sky on May 20 from NASA's Wallops
    Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia.

    EQUISat was built by students at Brown and if you look real carefully
    into the sky you might even see the bright blinking LED lights that are
    on board as the satellite travels some 250 miles upward over the earth.
    The satellite will transmit a CW beacon and 4FSK 9k6 telemetry on
    435.550 MHz. Its XDL Micro radio transceiver has the ability to
    communicate with radio amateurs as well as other ground stations, which
    can receive data from its sensors and current operation.

    The primary ground station for EQUISat is being built at the Ladd
    Observatory in partnership with the Brown Amateur Radio Club.

    The goal is for the satellite to depart the Space Station, enter orbit
    and using the earth's magnetic field, point its lights toward Rhode
    Island. Now that's a fitting homecoming for any college graduate.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Skeeter Nash N5ASH.

    (BROWNSPACE.ORG)

    *

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    BBC; Brownspace.Org; CNN; CQ Magazine; DX World; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Marty Pittenger KB3MXM; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; Ron Glass, WN7Y;
    South African Radio League; Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's
    QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you
    our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Neil Rapp WB9VPG in Bloomington Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    ***

    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
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    Please address all comments and questions to the ARNewsletter editor as described in this posting. If you have any specific questions related to the actual posting of this message, you may address them to hamfdn(at)wpusa.dynip.com.

    Thank you and good day!

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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Saturday, June 09, 2018 17:03:22
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2119 for Friday, June 8, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2119 with a release date of Friday,
    June 8, 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. The Maritime Mobile Service Network helps a ham
    in distress at sea. Amateurs celebrate a modern-day Marconi message --
    and we visit German's Ham Radio Friedrichshafen. All this and more as
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2119 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    QSO FROM CAPE COD WITH GUGLIELMO MARCONI'S DAUGHTER

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We open this week's report with news that someone named
    Marconi has successfully completed a contact by wireless across a body
    of water. But wait - this is almost 120 years after this transmission
    created unprecedented news - and this is, of course, a different
    Marconi. The event - with Marconi's daughter - was a big happening
    nonetheless as we hear from Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    KEVIN: Imagine a QSO with a Marconi. If you had been at the Cape Cod
    National Seashore on Thursday May 31st you would not have needed your imagination. At the Wellfleet Marconi Station there, the rig was tuned
    to 14.224 MHz. At the microphone was Guglielmo Marconi's daughter,
    Princess Elettra Marconi. Shortly before noon another wireless Marconi
    message went out -- this time to the historic Signal Hill station in Newfoundland, Canada. The special event coordinator of the Society of Newfoundland Radio Amateurs, Chris Hillier VO1IDX, had arranged for
    their station VO1AA to make the contact. At the microphone in Canada was 18-year-old Aaron Kent Abbott VO1FOX.

    Although Princess Elettra has visited both Marconi stations on previous occasions, the moment's significance was lost on no one - the radio
    pioneer himself first transmitted from this New England station on Jan.
    18, 1903 sending the first two-way wireless message from the U.S. to
    Europe. It was at the Newfoundland station on Dec. 12, 1901 that
    Guglielmo Marconi had received that historic first translatlantic signal
    - the letter "S" sent in Morse Code from England.

    More than a century later, the event in May was no less remarkable, said Barbara Dugan N1NS, a trustee of KM1CC, the Marconi Cape Cod Radio Club.
    She said [quote] "Marconi's magic was with us." [endquote]

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Kevin Trotman N5PRE.

    (ART DONAHUE W1AWX, BARBARA DUGAN N1NS)

    PAUL/ANCHOR: To hear the QSO between Princess Elettra and the Society of Newfoundland Radio Amateurs visit our website at arnewsline.org and
    click on the tab that says "EXTRA."

    **
    RADIO MUSEUM NEAR DUBLING GEARS UP FOR INTERNATIONAL WEEKEND

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Fresh on the heels of the recent Museum Ships Weekend is International Museums Weekend - and in Ireland, one participating radio
    museum also has a Marconi connection. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    JEREMY: Although ships, castles, pumping stations and aviation museums
    qualify as locations for International Museum activations, one museum
    near Dublin, Ireland is a natural for the event. Ye Olde Hurdy Gurdy
    Museum of Vintage Radio will be participating on Saturday and Sunday
    16th and 17th of June with the callsign EI0MAR. The museum is located in
    the Martello Tower the site of the first telegraphy station that
    connected Ireland to Great Britain in 1852. It was in this tower that America's Lee de Forest experimented with wireless telegraphy at the
    turn of the 20th century. The tower was also home to a Marconi receiving station that conducted experimental telegraphy communications with the
    HMS Monarch. Hams will be operating from that tower during the weekend
    and organizers say volunteer operators are needed for both SSB and CW.
    For details on how to participate, send an email to ei0mar at eircom dot
    net (ei0mar@eircom.net) The station is customarily operated by the Howth Martello Radio Group on Sundays. The site opened as a museum in 2003.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **
    THOUSANDS FLOCK TO HAM RADIO FRIEDRICHSHAFEN

    PAUL/ANCHOR: With Hamvention a memory, all eyes and ears turned recently
    the largest hamfest in Europe. Ed Durrant DD5LP was there - here's his
    report.

    ED'S REPORT: As most will know, Ham Radio Friedrichshafen is the largest Hamfest in Europe. This years theme was radio scouting (audio clip) of
    course, with lots of fun, that was the combined scout troops from
    several European countries who were attending Ham Radio Friedrichshafen
    this year. The theme extended into other youth orientated events
    including the hand-over of Youngsters on-the-air from the UK Organisers
    to the South African organisers.
    Attendance at the event was probably about 10% reduced due to the
    unfortunate coincidence that the date clashed with the IARU CW field day.

    There were several new dealers with new products, with Magnetic loop
    antennas practical for portable use to enormous, high power home station
    ones. One young Spanish company Komunica are designing and building HF
    and VHF mobile antennas in Europe, with new antennas due out in
    September. It's good to see not everything is being produced in the far
    east.

    SDR radios were very much in presence with several different companies displaying new or extended models. Of course the "big 5" were there and
    this was a chance to see the new Kenwood TS-890S and talk with its
    designer. As well as get a look at the Yaesu FTDX101D FT-818ND and the software update to the FT-2D Fusion handy to make it into a hot-spot.

    In general the slightly reduced numbers in the very large halls made it
    easier to get around. Only in the flea market was it as busy as ever.
    The addition of the Maker Faire with their Cosplay dressed people
    walking around added some flair and fun.

    Despite dire weather predictions, not one drop of rain fell over the
    three days of the event. rather it was sunny and in the high twenties Centigrade the whole time.

    So if you've never been to Ham Radio in Friedrichshafen, why not plan a
    visit for next year when it moves back to its usual weekend, which is
    June 21st to the 23rd 2019.

    That's Friedrichshafen for another year, now it's time to get ready for
    the WRTC in 6 weeks time. How did that go? "Dib di Dib Dib Dah Dah Di Dah"?

    For AR Newsline this has been Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **
    RADIO SCOUTING GOES TO CAMP

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Here in the United States, radio scouts are getting busy
    with summer camp. Here's Bill Stearns NE3RD.

    BILL'S REPORT: This week in Radio Scouting summer camp season has
    started and scouts are breaking codes and sending CW in Oregon.

    William Coverdell, WD0BC, is activating K2BSA/0 at Camp Geiger in St
    Joseph, MO, from June 10th to July 21st. The camp will be offering
    radio merit badge classes throughout the six week period. Scouts will
    be getting on the air with a generous station that is completely scout
    owned through 100% donations.

    Ed Evans, WV8ED, is activating K2BSA/8 at Camp Arrowhead in Ona, WV,
    from June 17th to the 23rd. Ed will have a ham radio demonstration
    station located in the STEM area of the camp for the week.

    Richard Zarczynski, AC8FJ, is also activating K2BSA/8 at D-Bar-A Scout
    Ranch in Metamora, MI, from June 24th to the 29th. This event is the
    very successful Trail to Eagle program designed for the older Scout
    which gives them the opportunity to work on the merit badges they need
    to complete their Eagle Scout rank requirements in a timely manner.
    Michael Boensch/W8MKB and Richard will again be offering the radio merit
    badge course and maintaining the special event station making others on
    the airwaves aware of and promoting the long history of the Trail To
    Eagle program over the various amateur radio bands.

    We have many other activations at other scout camps over on our Scout
    Camps on the Air page at scota.us. If you want to help out a local
    scout camp with donations of gear or your time and don't know who to
    contact, please contact us through our website.

    Finally, I received a report from Russ Mickiewicz, N7QR, about scouts
    out in Oregon that were having some fun with another popular merit
    badge: Signs, Signals, and Code.

    A new generation of code-breakers and communications experts was
    launched at Oregon's Sunset Trail District Camporee in May, 2018. About
    100 scouts learned the crafts that had once been vital for
    communications and survival: semaphore (flag) signals, Morse Code, and
    code ciphers.

    Scouts were broken up into teams after training. One team would be
    sending a coded message in semaphore, while the other team would decode
    the message and then send their response back with Morse Code using a flashlight. The semaphore team would record the message and confirm the correct decode by sending an R in semaphore back to the other team.

    For the rest of the story and more information on radio scouting, please
    visit our website at www.k2bsa.net.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline and the K2BSA Amateur Radio Association, this
    is Bill Stearns, NE4RD

    (K2BSA)

    **
    SILENT KEY: LLOYD WICKS VO1PJ

    PAUL/ANCHOR: A longtime amateur radio operator in Canada who trained for
    a career in radio before becoming a noted judge in Newfoundland and
    Labrador has become a Silent Key. Lloyd Wicks VO1PJ died on June 1. The earliest part of his career began at the Radio College of Canada in
    Toronto where he trained to become a radio technician. In his spare
    time, he devoted himself to various activities as a ham radio operator.
    As his interest in politics and public policy grew, he returned home and switched careers, becoming first a lawyer and then a judge. Lloyd
    eventually became Newfoundland and Labrador's first Child and Youth
    Advocate and the first youth court judge. He retired in 1993.
    Lloyd Wicks was 85.

    (CBC)

    **
    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including
    the K4LYL repeater at 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays in Bedford, Virginia.

    **
    MARITIME MOBILE SERVICE NETWORK AIDS IN MEDICAL EMERGENCY

    PAUL/ANCHOR: High seas emergencies have always gotten top priority for
    the Maritime Mobile Service Network since it began operations in 1968.
    So when the latest call for help came in late May, the net answered, as
    we hear from Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    CHRISTIAN: Timothy Henning KE7WMZ wasn't expecting to end his
    around-the-world sail with a distress call - but by the time the Arizona
    radio amateur's vessel, the Victory Cat, was about 200 miles south of
    Ensenada Mexico on May 23rd, he had developed a severe problem with his
    right eye and was having vision issues. He made a distress call on 20
    meters at about 1530 UTC and it was picked up by Maritime Mobile Service Network Net Control Operator Harry Williams W0LS. Harry stayed on the
    radio with Tim while contacting the Coast Guard in California. The Coast
    Guard met Tim at Ensenada and he was taken from there to the Balboa
    Naval Hospital in San Diego.

    According to Net Manager Jeff Savasta KB4JKL, Tim got the diagnosis that
    he had suffered a severely detached retina. He was taken to Phoenix,
    Arizona for surgery.

    Following his surgery, Tim emailed the members of the 50-year-old net to express his gratitude for a response that was, his words "professional
    and invaluable." His voyage completed, he can now concentrate on recovery.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Christian Cudnik K0STH.

    (JEFF SAVASTA KB4JKL)

    **
    (BROOM) HANDLING LOGISTICS FOR WRTC 2018

    PAUL/ANCHOR: As the weeks move closer to the World Radiosport Team Championship next month in Germany, it all comes down to logistics.
    Here's Ed Durrant DD5LP with an update.

    ED'S REPORT: Without 1300 broom handles it can't happen!

    Almost casually, Robby Pöschk, DM6DX, mentioned in our latest
    teleconference: "We have the 1300 broom handles and the more than 30 Kilometres of barrier tape along with the more than 65 Dixie portaloos
    in supplies." That caused some frivolity between the organizers of the
    WRTC 2018 and some disbelief. Surprised at the 1300 broom handles, the
    press spokesman asked why so many were needed. "Without sky hooks, I can
    not secure the operators area in the sites," was the answer of the
    logistics officer Robby Pöschk.

    The simple fence is the combination of 20 broom handles and 500 m of red
    & white barrier tape to surround the antennas and the station tents at
    the 65 locations. This avoids anyone tripping over the guy wires, having access to the antennas and tent and possibly causing damage. It still
    seems unusual though. Who would have thought of broom handles being
    required for the amateur radio world championship!

    Robby, DM6DX, talks about WRTC's small and big challenges in logistics:
    "There are 130 tables, lamps, fans and 198 chairs that are not available
    from the furniture store around the corner. So we had to order the lamps
    for the stations directly from the manufacturer. "
    Teleconferences take place in the areas of organization, Internet
    technology and public relations, and quickly reveal the immense effort involved behind the scenes for the WRTC. Logistics covers acquiring and transferring material such as antennas, masts, generators and station
    tents. There are intensive discussions with local authorities in
    Wittenberg and Jessen. In the technical area the IT conferences move up
    a level and those without IT knowledge understand nothing. Last of all,
    how the WRTC is portrayed to the public through words, pictures and
    films, and which news reports should be released is covered on the
    agenda and the discussions of the PR team teleconference.

    For every organizational group the clock is running and the countdown continues unimpeded to the start of the World Championship. It has a motivating effect on the organizers, the "To Do" lists show not only
    open actions but also many entries marked as "done." "As this continues,
    it creates a very positive adrenaline rush and more and more excitement
    for what is coming," said Chris Janßen, DL1MGB, President WRTC 2018.
    It's now less than 40 days until the start of the first ever German WRTC.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP

    **
    HOW ABOUT SOME DSTAR for FIELD DAY?

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Meanwhile hams in the U.S. have Field Day on their minds.
    One group of hams, however, is adding a new element into the mix. Neil
    Rapp WB9VPG explains.

    NEIL: If you're looking for an educational activity bonus for this
    year's Field Day, maybe D-STAR is the thing for you! D-STAR is one of
    the several digital voice modes available on VHF and UHF that also makes linking between repeaters easier. The organizers of the Quadnet Array,
    a group of linked reflectors and smart groups around the world on
    D-STAR, are inviting groups that want to demonstrate D-STAR to join in
    as a central gathering place during Field Day. Tom Early, N7TAE explains.

    TOM: We are offering just to say, "Hey, we're here." If you want to demonstrate D-STAR on your Field Day, then we're here and you can talk
    to us or you can have people listen in. Hopefully it will be fairly
    busy, so you'll hear some people checking in from all over. But that's
    pretty much the standard way it is there anyway, because like I say
    we've got a couple of international reflectors in the array, and there's always someone interesting to talk to.

    NEIL: To connect to the Quadnet Array you will need to either login to
    one of the Smart Groups which include DSTAR1 in New York, DSTAR2 in San Francisco, or DSTAR3 in Ohio. Or, link to one of the reflectors: XRF757A
    in Atlanta, XLX049D in Northern Ireland, XLX307D in Wyoming, or XLX626D
    in New Zealand. If you have any questions about connecting to the array,
    email admins@openquad.net. While you won't be able to use repeaters for scoring QSOs on Field Day, you can score some interest.

    Reporting for Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Neil Rapp, WB9VPG in
    Bloomington, Indiana

    **
    CONGRATULATIONS TO 'QSO TODAY'

    PAUL/ANCHOR: We here at Newsline would also like to congratulate Eric
    Guth ("GOOTH") 4Z1UG on reaching the milestone of his 200th edition of
    his podcast "QSO Today."

    **

    KICKER: WHEN PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS FLY LIKE AN EAGLE

    PAUL/ANCHOR: Finally, what do public service announcements, also known
    as PSAs, have in common with the American rock band, the Eagles? Mike
    Askins KE5CXP has that answer.

    MIKE: The latest releases from rock legend Joe Walsh WB6ACU are no match
    for "Hotel California" or "Life's Been Good" which are staples for so
    many of his fans. For ham radio operators, though, the guitarist and songwriter has landed on the charts anyway - well, maybe more like the
    band plan. Joe has recorded a series of public service announcements for
    the American Radio Relay League explaining the importance of ham radio
    and the league's advocacy role. The video and audio messages are being
    made available to radio and TV outlets as well as ARRL affiliated clubs
    to use at meetings or public events.

    The recording artist's studio sessions were at league headquarters in Connecticut at W1AW. Joe's previous visits to the station included
    donations of some of his vintage equipment and some on-air operating
    that generated massive pileups.

    Joe's PSAs, however, are easily downloadable from the ARRL website. All
    you need is....an Eagle eye.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Mike Askins KE5CXP.

    (QRZNOW.COM, ARRL)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    Art Donahue W1AWX; Barbara Dugan, N1NS; the BBC; CBC; CQ Magazine; DX
    World; Hap Holly and the Rain Report; Jeff Savasta KB4JKL; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZNOW.COM, Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO
    Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; and you our listeners, that's all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send
    emails to our address at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO in Valparaiso Indiana saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.



    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, June 15, 2018 00:10:06
    Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2120 for Friday, June 15, 2018

    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2120 with a release date of Friday,
    June 15, 2018, to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. Australian amateurs catch Field Day fever; YLs
    prep for their big convention this summer - and a radio amateur gets a government post in Spain. All this and more as Amateur Radio Newsline
    Report 2120 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    AUSTRALIA HAS FIELD DAY FEVER

    JIM/ANCHOR: We open this week's newscast with the question: do you have
    Field Day fever yet? If you're hearing this report in Australia, a fair distance from the ARRL event of the same name, the answer is probably
    yes. Graham Kemp VK4BB explains.

    GRAHAM: Don't look now but we're barely a week away from Field Day - no,
    not the summer contest going on in that other hemisphere. Here in
    Australia it's a winter event known as VHF-UHF Field Day and hams are
    gearing up for it on the 23rd and 24th of June. The competition promotes amateur operation on VHF and microwave bands as well as portable
    operation - or, as the Wireless Institute of Australia puts it - "head
    for the hills." Hams can even move from location to location throughout
    the contest.

    The 24-hour operation does not exclude home stations, either - they
    simply have their own section for competition. Field Day does preclude operation making use of satellites or repeaters: Work it simplex or not
    at all.

    Although the first VHF-UHF Field Day was a test undertaken in January of
    1989, Winter VHF-UHF Field Day came along much later. This year it marks
    its tenth year.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Graham Kemp VK4BB.

    **
    YOUNG LADIES' RADIO LEAGUE PREPS FOR CONVENTION

    JIM/ANCHOR: With all our recent reports of Dayton Hamvention and Friedrichshafen behind us, we take a look now at big plans being made by
    an amateur radio group in which YLs help YLs. To tell us more, here's
    Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    PAUL: Hamfest and convention season is upon us once again. I think it's
    safe to say that most hams enjoy a good gathering of the tribe so they
    can catch up with old friends, meet new ones, enjoy some food and prowl through the swap meet looking for that one special piece of stuff that
    they can't live without.

    Most ham radio gatherings, however, tend to be, well, guy-heavy. There
    is one, however, that is specifically for women hams to learn from and
    to help other women hams and that is August 2018 meeting of the YLRL. I
    spoke with Michelle Carey, W5MQC about the organization:

    CAREY: The YLRL is the Young Ladies' Radio League. The club has actually
    been around since 1939. It started with an ad in QST Magazine where one
    YL was looking for "where are all the other YL's?" The response to that
    ad was twelve ladies and that's what they're calling the "Founding
    Mothers."

    PAUL: Carey said that the group holds a convention every three to four
    years at various locations around the country. According to Carey, the
    last one was in Washington state, and before that Ohio and Alabama and
    this year it's going to be in Oklahoma.

    CAREY: The convention is going to take place at the Sheraton Hotel in
    downtown Oklahoma City. At the convention we're going to have some
    really incredible speakers. We're going to have Ria, N2RJ - she's going
    to talk to us all about digital modes, Andrea Slack, K2EZ is going to
    get us all rovering - you know, she's one of the top rovers. Our banquet keynote speaker is Nancy Hall, KC4IYD, a research scientist with NASA
    and she's the district representative for District 8 of the YLRL.

    Carol Milazzo, KP4MD, she's going to get us all ready to go on a remote vacation with her DXPedition. We're also going to have some Elmira-ing sessions where we can all get together and help each other so whether
    it's Echolink, setting up your first HF rig, logging your contacts, DMR,
    FT8, how do you program your radio, we're going to have some testing
    sessions and we're all going to have a little fun.

    PAUL: Carey said that men can attend the convention, but that they must accompany a licensed woman. She said that the focus is primarily on
    YLs. So, if this all sounds fun to you, please check out the
    convention's website at triple-w Y-L-R-L_convention dot org.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Paul Braun WD9GCO.

    **
    A SPORTING WAY TO SCORE AT THE WRTC

    JIM/ANCHOR: The radio athletes are ready for the big World Radiosport
    Team Championship taking place July 12 through 16. So how is everyone
    going to know the score? Ed Durrant DD5LP explains.

    ED: How's the competition going? Who is ahead? Where is a particular
    team? Answers to these questions interest competitors and spectators
    alike, in every sport - including radio sports. It's about speed not
    only in the operators at the WRTC stations but also with results
    reporting. On-line presentation of the current scores requires a lot of technical effort behind the scenes! Ben Büttner, DL6RAI, who leads the responsible IT team at WRTC 2018, says: "We want to make sure that from
    all the competition locations, the on-going results in minute intervals
    are available on a scoreboard similar to a Football league table and at
    the same on the Internet published on www.wrtc2018.de. "In order for
    this to work, special attention is attached to unwanted RF radiation,
    thermal stability and redundant power when we build the Score Collection Computers."

    The SCCs, which are built on a RaspberryPi base, collect the information required for the presentation of the results from the relevant logbook software at each site and transfer this data via the mobile phone
    network to a central server. From the results gathered there, the
    current position table is created and made visible on the Internet for everyone.

    The idea of a current scores table is not new. The scoreboards were
    already available in 2002 "on-line", but only current on an hourly
    basis. At that time, the referees sent messages via SMS, which were then published to the Internet. At the time it was extraordinary and a
    novelty. At WRTC 2014 in Boston, Bob Raymond, WA1Z and Dave Pascoe,
    KM3T, developed the SCC concept. When used in 2014, however, it became
    clear that not all locations could be reliably reached via the local
    mobile phone network.

    "You can watch the top people driving each other during the contest.
    This scoreboard is also interesting and useful for normal radio ops as
    often there are competitors with similar station capabilities to the
    normal Op. This is fun and transforms the contest into a new kind of
    direct head-to-head competition," comments Michael Höding, DL6MHW.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    HAM NAMED MINISTER FOR SCIENCE IN SPAIN

    JIM/ANCHOR: It's not unusual for government officials to also be
    licensed as hams. Think of King Hussein of Jordan JY1. Think of U.S.
    Senator Barry Goldwater K7UGA. Well, now Spain has an influential
    amateur as one of its own in government. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH with
    those details.

    JEREMY: Spain's new Socialist government not only has a record number of
    women -- 11 -- in its 17 cabinet posts but it has one amateur radio
    operator as well: Pedro Duque, 55, KC5RGG / ED4ISS is the new minister
    of science. Pedro was among those sworn in recently by Spain's King
    Felipe VI.

    The former astronaut has been well-grounded since his last space mission
    in 2003 on board the International Space Station where he spent a week
    and completed two ARISS contacts with schools in Spain. His first trip
    into space came in 1998 as part of NASA's STS-95 mission from Cape
    Canaveral in Florida. It was a nine-day mission aboard the shuttle
    Discovery and he was a mission specialist.

    The new science minister is an aeronautical engineer who will now
    concern himself with more earthly matters.

    FOr Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    (SOUTHGATE, BBC)

    **

    A LIFE-SAVING PACT IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    JIM/ANCHOR: Atlantic hurricane season has begun and preparedness is on everyone's minds in that region. The Dominican Republic is taking no
    chances - it's reaffirming its partnership with hams. Here's Andy
    Morrison K9AWM with more.

    ANDY MORRISON: In the Dominican Republic, which has seen its share of
    weather disasters, Radio Club Dominicano has signed an agreement with Dominican Civilian Defense. The May 30 pact cements the relationship
    between the two, ensuring enhanced cooperation during emergencies.

    The two will work together with Dominican Civil Defense relying on the
    radio club for emergency communications during disaster response. The
    club notes that the agreement comes just as the Atlantic hurricane
    season gets underway. The Dominican Republic was among the places
    devastated last year during Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM.

    **

    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including
    the K7EFZ repeater in Firth Idaho on Friday evenings at 9:30 local time
    during the weekly net.

    **

    SILENT KEY: YASME FOUNDATION DIRECTOR/SECRETARY KIP EDWARDS W6SZN

    JIM/ANCHOR: The influential Yasme Foundation and its supports are
    mourning the death of an amateur who was its lifeblood. Stephen Kinford
    N8WB has that report.

    STEPHEN'S REPORT: The director and secretary of the Yasme Foundation, a nonprofit that supports amateur radio projects worldwide, has become a
    Silent Key. DXpeditioner and DX contester G. Kip Edwards W6SZN, of
    Indianola, Washington, died on June 6.

    Yasme Foundation president Ward Silver, N0AX, told the ARRL that Kip was
    the prime mover behind a number of important grant programs and brought
    a sharp sense of organization to several amateur radio organizations. A
    lawyer by training, he retired in 2013 from a San Francisco practice
    where he had been a partner. He relocated to Washington state.

    A member of the DXCC Honor roll, Kip got his earliest amateur radio
    license at the age of 11 in Kansas. He rekindled an interest in the
    hobby as an adult after years of inactivity. He eventually became
    president of the Northern California Contest Club and editor of its newsletter. He was honored by the club as Contester of the Year in 1982.
    He was also a member and one-time president of the Northern California
    DX Club.

    He was a life member of the ARRL and a member of the ARRL Maxim Society.
    Kip was 71.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Stephen Kinford N8WB.

    (YASME FOUNDATION, ARRL)

    **
    SILENT KEY: JAPAN AMATEUR RADIO LEAGUE PAST PRESIDENT SHOZO HARA JA1AN

    JIM/ANCHOR: In Japan, ham radio operators are marking the death of an influential past president and CQ Hall of Famer. We have that report
    from Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    ROBERT: The past president of the Japan Amateur Radio League and a
    member of the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame has become a Silent Key.
    Shozo Hara JA1AN, who had trained as an electrical engineer at Waseda University, died on June 9.

    The Nagasaki prefecture native became a director of the league in 1972
    and then was chosen as president. He served for 41 years, stepping down
    in 2011. He had also been the first president of the Japan Amateur Radio Development Association.

    CQ inducted him into the Amateur Radio Hall of Fame in 2003.

    Shozo Hara, who had also been an accomplished equestrian, was 91.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Robert Broomhead VK3DN.

    **

    THAILAND PUTS AMATEUR RADIO EXAMS ON LINE FOR SAMPLING

    JIM/ANCHOR: Sure you've got your license in your home country - but do
    you ever wonder if you could qualify elsewhere? Jason Daniels VK2LAW
    helps answer that question.

    JASON: Could you qualify for your amateur license in Thailand? If you
    aren't one of that nation's 110,000 radio amateurs and want to see if
    you could make the grade, the National Broadcasting and
    Telecommunications Commission, Thailand's communications agency, has
    posted sample exams online for the world to see and perhaps sample.

    For years, any exams other than those for the basic license were
    unavailable - but now the intermediate and advanced tests are among
    those posted online.

    The tests are timed, by the way. You have 90 minutes to answer 100
    questions for the basic and intermediate license and two hours for the
    100 questions on the advanced license examination. They don't count for
    a real license but they give you a good idea of what would be involved
    if you sat for the test.

    Meanwhile, those who have their license are getting an opportunity to
    use a special event call sign now through Oct. 31. Be listening for
    stations using HS50IARU which commemorates the 50th anniversary of
    Region 3 of the International Amateur Radio Union. Thailand is among a
    number of countries whose amateur societies belong to Region 3.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    (SOUTHGATE)

    **

    WORLD OF DX

    In the world of DX, be listening for Tatsuko, JJ1BDT from Palau in
    Micronesia using the call sign T88YL. She is operating holiday style
    from June 22nd through June 27th on 40, 17 and 15 meters SSB. She is new
    to the HF bands and asks everyone's patience. Send QSLs via JR1FKR.

    Dave, W9DR is active as VP5/W9DR from the Caicos Islands from the
    13th to the 25th of June. He is on 6 meters only, operating SSB and CW.
    Send QSLs direct to his home call.

    John, W5JON, will once again be active as V47JA from his vacation home
    at Calypso Bay, St. Kitts, from June 22nd through July 20th. Listen for
    him on 160-6 meters, including 60 meters, on SSB. He will also be in the
    Phone Section of the IARU SSB Contest July 14th and 15th. Send QSLs to
    W5JON direct or via LoTW. No bureau QSLs please.

    Listen for Special station VP8HDM on the 16th and 17th of June from the Historic Dockyard Museum in Stanley in the Falkland Islands. You can
    hear the station on FT8 and SSB. Send QSLs via VP8LP, direct only.

    (OHIO-PENN DX)

    **
    100 WATTS AND A WIRE TOTALS 1,630 CONTACTS

    JIM/ANCHOR: We here at Newsline would also like to congratulate one of
    our own - Christian Cudnik K0STH - on a successful Tune-Up Weekend June
    8th through 10th. He reports that 56 states and provinces and 21
    countries were worked for a total of 1,630 total contacts -- most of
    them on SSB.

    **

    KICKER: DEATH OF A NAVAJO CODE TALKER

    JIM/ANCHOR: Finally, we mark the death of one of the last surviving
    Navajo Code Talkers. Samuel Tom Holiday died in the Southern Utah
    Veterans Home on June 11 at age 94. He was one of hundreds of Navajos to utilize an unbreakable code during World War II - a code based on the
    Navajo language which the Japanese were never able to crack. According
    to various news reports, there are fewer than 10 Code Talkers remaining
    from that era.

    Samuel Tom Holiday, a native of Utah, served with the United States
    Marine Corps. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey called him a "true American
    patriot and hero" for his service to the allied forces. He had been the recipient of a Congressional Silver Medal and the Purple Heart.

    He was to be buried on the Navajo Reservation, in Kayenta, Arizona
    beside his wife. His honor lives on in the library and media center of
    the Kayenta Middle School which was dedicated in his name last November.
    Thank you for your service Samuel Tom Holiday.

    (FOX 10 PHOENIX, NATIVE NEWS ONLINE)

    **

    NEWSCAST CLOSE: With thanks to Alan Labs; Amateur News Weekly; the ARRL;
    BBC; CQ Magazine; DX World; Fox 10 Phoenix; Hap Holly and the Rain
    Report; Native News Online; Ohio-Penn DX Bulletin; QRZNOW.COM, Southgate Amateur Radio News; Ted Randall's QSO Radio Show; Wireless Institute of Australia; WTWW Shortwave; Yasme Foudation and you our listeners, that's
    all from the Amateur Radio Newsline. Please send emails to our address
    at newsline@arnewsline.org. More information is available at Amateur
    Radio Newsline's only official website at www.arnewsline.org.

    For now, with Caryn Eve Murray, KD2GUT, at the news desk in New York,
    and our news team worldwide, I'm Jim Damron N8TMW in Charleston West
    Virginia saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

    Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2018. All rights reserved.


    --



    73
    James-KB7TBT
    www.arnewsline.org
    www.ylsystem.org




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    As a Service to the HAM Radio Community and HAM Operators all over the world, this Amateur Radio Newline(tm) message has been gated from the internet and posted to you by Waldo's Place USA, fidonet node 1:3634/12. We hope you
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    Thank you and good day!

    -73- ARNTE-0.1.0-OS2 build 42
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    * Origin: (1:3634/12)
  • From ARNewsline poster@1:3634/12 to all on Friday, June 22, 2018 09:51:28


    Amateur Radio Newsline Report Number 2121 with a release date of Friday,
    June 22, 2018 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

    The following is a QST. A pioneer in CW keying becomes a Silent Key. The Technician class license exams in the U.S. are about to get new
    questions -- and we look ahead at the Ducie Island DXpedition. All this
    and more as Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2121 comes your way right now.

    **

    BILLBOARD CART

    **
    MAKING THE ROUNDS FOR DUCIE ISLAND

    NEIL/ANCHOR: We begin this week with an update on the Ducie Island
    DXpedition which sets off in late October. Excitement is building - and progress is too. For that update we turn to Jason Daniels VK2LAW.

    JASON: The Ducie Island DXpedition team continues to gather momentum
    toward its operations as VP6D on October 20th through November 3rd.

    The newest member of the pilot team is 15-year-old Mason Matrazzo
    KM4SII, who made his debut DXPedition last year at age 14 operating from Iceland. He is heading to Curacao next month as PJ2/KM4SII. The
    DXpedition team has been making the rounds, attending at Dayton
    Hamvention and the International DX Convention in Visalia (Viz-AIL-yah) California in the U.S. and Friedrichshafen (FREED RICK'S Harfen) in
    Germany to talk up the trip and meet with corporate sponsors.

    They also continue with their fundraising to help defray personal
    expenses of the team members themselves. For more information about this much-awaited South Pacific DXpedition or to help support it visit vp6d.com

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jason Daniels VK2LAW.


    (SOUTHGATE)


    **

    FIELD DAY: SMALL VOICES, BIG DREAMS

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Remember your first Field Day? Whether it was long ago - or
    just last year - one group of hams in California is hoping you'll make
    this year's Field Day memorable for some young first-timers. Don
    Wilbanks AE5DW tells us more.

    DON: Field Day has been in everyone's sights for quite some time now --
    but for one group of youngsters in California, it marks their
    long-awaited first Field Day and a first opportunity to operate on HF.
    Members of Scout Troop 44 and Cub Scout Pack 458 are operating side by
    side with the San Mateo Amateur Radio Club using the club call sign
    W6UQ. In addition they will be running their own small-scale Field Day operation as KZ6BSA. Donn Lovell K8DLL, whose son 14-year-old Connor
    K7CBL, will be among those radio Scouts, said that the youngsters will
    have their own miniature Field Day with simplex contacts on 2 meters and
    70 cm. He also said they will get some practice air time, just for fun,
    using FRS/GMRS radios and later, repeaters. Donn told Newsline the
    Scouts' hope that even with all the QRN and pileups that are sure be happening, hams will be listening for those squeaky little voices out
    there calling "CQ Field Day."

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Wilbanks AE5DW.

    **

    FIELD DAY GREETINGS FROM GERMANY

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In an apparent show of solidarity with Field Day
    participants in the U.S., the Mighty KBC, as it is known in Germany,
    plans to transmit greetings in MFSK64 in the hopes it will be heard by amateurs throughout North America. The transmission by the 100 kW HF
    broadcast transmitter is set for the 24th of June sometime around 0130
    UTC. This is to occur during the weekly "Giant Jukebox" broadcast of the Mighty KBC on 9925 kHz. Naturally, reception reports are encouraged.

    Hams should email them to themightykbc@gmail.com.

    **

    FINAL PREPARATION FOR 'WORLD CUP RADIO' AT WRTC

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Calling all sports fans! Er....we mean radio contesting
    fans. If you're following the final weeks until the World Radiosport
    Team Championship, our good sport Ed Durrant DD5LP is here to help you
    make sense of it.

    ED: They're all preparing, they’re all training, now they're all packing!
    From all parts of the world, the contestants for WRTC 2018 in Germany
    are getting ready to come to Wittenberg for the Amateur Radio World Cup!

    It's been a hard-fought effort over the last few years to qualify by
    being at the top of major contest tables but now it's less than 4 weeks
    until they can "prove their metal" competing against the best in the
    world on a level playing field.

    Amateur radio again shows no respect for politics with two-person teams
    not only from single countries but across countries who were at one time enemies. Russians working alongside Americans, parts of the old
    Yugoslavia working together on the radio, old feelings lost in the magic
    of radio competition.

    There are young and old and some in between. From New Zealand there is a father-and-daughter team, there's three youth teams including one with a
    U.S. and a Chilean ham, one with a Ukrainian and Romanian ham and one
    with a Hungarian and a German ham. Of course, there are the well-known
    "old hands" taking part as well.

    Unfortunately, this time no contestants qualified from the UK or
    Australia. Perhaps they'll have to make do with winning the Soccer World
    Cup final which takes place on the same day as the WRTC!

    For a full list of contestants and their biographies go to WRTC2018
    (dot) DE and click on "competition" followed by "participants."
    One thing is for sure, no matter who wins on July 15th, all competitors, helpers and visitors are looking forward to having a great time
    together, no matter what else is happening in the world!

    STOP PRESS - this just in: Using two 300 Kilowatt transmitters from
    Europe Radio DARC will broadcast just before the start of the
    competition, a WRTC special program across Europe on 6,070 kHz and to
    North America on 13,860 kHz on Saturday the 14th at 1100 UTC for an hour.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline this has been Ed Durrant DD5LP.

    **

    SILENT KEY: KEYER-CHIP PIONEER JACK CURTIS K6KU

    NEIL/ANCHOR: CW enthusiasts are no stranger to the name Jack Curtis or
    his eponymous Curtis Morse Keyer Chip. The man who gave hams a new way
    to key Morse Code has become a Silent Key. Here's Andy Morrison K9AWM
    with more.

    ANDY: The radio amateur who revolutionized CW keyers with the use of an
    IC chip has become a Silent Key. Jack Curtis K6KU - formerly W3NSJ - was
    the father of the Curtis Morse Keyer chip, reshaping the way keying
    could be done with the use of memory. His first chip, known as the 8043,
    was released in 1973 followed by a series of others, ending with a
    20-pin chip in 1986. The 20-pin chip incorporated A or B iambic modes
    and output for a speed meter.

    His chips found their way from commercial keyers into commercial amateur
    rigs and were popular in homebrew projects as well. The Pennsylvania
    native, an electrical engineer, worked for Sperry Rand and later Corning Glass, after serving in the Navy. His side business, Curtis Electro
    Devices, was founded to market his Morse Code iambic keyer and later
    provided memory chips for the emerging cellular industry. The company
    closed in 2000.

    At the time of his death on June 4 he was a resident of Granite Bay, California. Jack Curtis was 87.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Andy Morrison K9AWM

    (ARRL)

    **
    DISASTER DRILL, BUT WHERE ARE ALL THE HAMS?

    NEIL/ANCHOR: What if someone held a disaster drill and nobody came? Well
    it didn't happen that way exactly in India recently, but the turnout
    among amateurs turned out to be a challenge. Here's Jeremy Boot G4NJH
    with details.

    JEREMY: A mock disaster drill held in Uttar Pradesh, India by the
    National Disaster Management Authority turned out to have one challenge
    that was real: finding amateur radio operators. The exercise in Lucknow focused on the state's 23 flood-prone districts. It relied on the
    readiness of of the state police, along with the National Disaster
    Response Force. On the website of the Amateur Radio Club of Lucknow,
    Pandit VU2DCT wrote that he turned out to be the sole amateur taking
    part in the exercise. It appears that no hams reside in any of the
    districts where the drill was scheduled.

    Pandit, who is secretary of the ham radio club, wrote that he was able
    to provide his fellow participants with an oral presentation on amateur
    radio. He posted a hopeful observation too that most of the dignitaries present at the day's exercise showed an interest in what ham radio can do.

    For Amateur Radio Newsline I'm Jeremy Boot G4NJH.

    **

    BREAK HERE: Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur
    Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world, including
    the Spokane, Washington UHF Repeater of K7TMF and K7MMA on Fridays at 5
    p.m. Pacific Time.

    **
    NEW QUESTION POOL FOR TECHNICIAN CLASS EXAM

    NEIL/ANCHOR: In the U.S., the question pool is changing for the
    Technician Class license exam as of July 1st. Every three years the
    questions are changed, modified, and brought up to date by the National Conference of Volunteer Exam Coordinators. So as of July 1, you can
    consider all the old license test preparation materials like manuals,
    online practice tests, Power Point presentations and such to be
    outdated. Approximately 60 of the Technician license questions were
    replaced. Most of the questions focus on the same concepts but wording
    changes will bring the material up to date. If you are part of a
    Volunteer Exam team, you must use the new exams starting on July 1st.
    So VEs, be sure to change out those tests. And if you’re studying with
    old books, be aware that some of those questions will change while the
    topics, for the most part, won’t. If you’ve been studying with the old books, June 30 is your last chance to take the test before the big change.

    **
    GET YOUR FEET WET WITH 'BEACHES ON THE AIR'

    NEIL/ANCHOR: Now here's an awards program that will have you wishing for
    an endless summer. Mike Askins KE5CXP is our man on the beach for this
    story.

    MIKE: While some people bring suntan lotion and a surfboard - or maybe
    just a good book -- to the beach, others wouldn't be seen on the shore
    without their rig and an antenna. Because a beach day can also be a ham
    radio day, the program known as Beaches on the Air is encouraging hams
    to operate portable and qualify for awards as activators. Chasers - the
    hams who contact them - can also compete for honors.

    The idea took root in a conversation in 2013 between Diego EC1CW and his friend Ernesto EA1LQ, a fellow ham and SOTA activator. Diego told
    Newsline that the awards scheme really took off sometime after December
    of 2015 when he chose the windy Atlantic coastline of the Spanish beach
    at Riazor (ree-ah-Zore) for the first activations. Beaches on the Air
    w